Proudly servicing the Mornington Peninsula region for more than 30 years, we are an Australian Independent Bookseller with a diverse range of titles for young and old.
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BEST SELLERS: April: NON FICTION

Barefoot Investor1. The Barefoot Investor (Scott Pape)

This is the only money guide you’ll ever need.

That’s a bold claim, given there are already thousands of finance books on the shelves.

So what makes this one different?

Well, you won’t be overwhelmed with a bunch of ‘tips’ … or a strict budget (that you won’t follow).  You’ll get a step-by-step formula: open this account, then do this; call this person, and say this; invest money here, and not there. All with a glass of wine in your hand.

This book will show you how to create an entire financial plan that is so simple you can sketch it on the back of a serviette … and you’ll be able to manage your money in 10 minutes a week.

Sound too good to be true? It’s not.

This book is full of stories from everyday Aussies — single people, young families, empty nesters, retirees — who have applied the simple steps in this book and achieved amazing, life-changing results.

And you’re next.


Fifteen Young Men2. Fifteen Young Men (Paul Kennedy)

It was a maritime tragedy that unfolded one sad, dark hour at a time. A cold, cruelly blustery night revealing – with agonising slowness – that fifteen young men of the Mornington Football Club would never make it home. As dawn broke and families began to mourn, a nation was to learn the full extent of one of the world’s worst sporting disasters.

The sinking of the Process in catastrophically rough seas off Victoria’s Mornington Peninsula in 1892, with the loss of all on board, horrified Australia. ‘Such an accident has no parallel in our land’s history,’ reported The Argus. Yet somehow, for more than a century, this calamitous event slipped from Australia’s consciousness.

In Fifteen Young Men, journalist Paul Kennedy reveals the stories behind the tragedy. In his compelling evocation of a spirited Australian town on the cusp of a new century, he captures the trauma of families and friends suffering almost unbearable loss, but also the irrepressible optimism of the times, and the mateship, love and resilience that would come to define a budding nation.


CSIRO3. CSIRO Low Carb Diet (Grant Brinkworth)

Based on emerging research from around the world, as well as original CSIRO research recently conducted in Australia, the low-carb diet has proved successful in managing lifestyle-induced metabolic diseases, including unhealthy weight gain and type 2 diabetes. The diet lowers the proportion of carbohydrate relative to protein and unsaturated ‘healthy’ fat, and encourages participants to follow a regular exercise routine.

This easy-to-follow, comprehensive lifestyle plan integrates these principles and can help you not only to reach your weight-loss goals, but also to maximise its benefits for improved metabolic health, blood glucose control and diabetes management.


Trigger_Warning_cover-250x2504. Trigger Warning (Bill Leak)

Bill Leak’s daily cartoons in The Australian newspaper have been variously described as the works of a genius and Australia’s most insightful and thought-provoking arbiter of the main story of the day. Thumbing through Trigger Warning, a collection of Bill’s cartoons from 2016, it’s easy to argue that those terms have not been used loosely.


Lion5. Lion: A Long Way Home (Saroo Brierley)

When Saroo Brierley used Google Earth to find his long-lost home town half a world away, he made global headlines.

Saroo had become lost on a train in India at the age of five. Not knowing the name of his family or where he was from, he survived for weeks on the streets of Kolkata, before being taken into an orphanage and adopted by a couple in Australia.

Despite being happy in his new family, Saroo always wondered about his origins. He spent hours staring at the map of India on his bedroom wall. When he was a young man the advent of Google Earth led him to pore over satellite images of the country for landmarks he recognised. And one day, after years of searching, he miraculously found what he was looking for.

Then he set off on a journey to find his mother.

Lion: A Long Way Home is a moving and inspirational true story that celebrates the importance of never letting go of what drives the human spirit – hope. Now a major motion picture starring Dev Patel, Nicole Kidman and Rooney Mara.


Unmasked6. Unmasked (Turia Pitt)

Whether via the numerous media reports, 60 Minutes specials, Women’s Weekly cover stories or her first book, Everything To Live For, we know about the why, how and what of that fateful day in September 2011. We know how she died four times on the operating table and her tortuous road to recovery. We’ve had a glimpse of the love of her boyfriend, Michael, that sustained her, and seen hints of the inner-strength that has made her one of the most admired women in the country. But until now, the true essence of this most remarkable Australian, plus the toll her accident has all taken on her and those around her, have remained a mystery.

How and why does she push herself to ever greater physical and mental limits? What does she see when she looks in the mirror? How does her sudden celebrity (for the most unorthodox of reasons) sit with her? What lessons has she learned in the past five years? And, crucially, how can each and every one of us take those lessons and apply them to our own lives?

More than a simple chronology of events – and against the backdrop of a never-ending series of impressive physical feats, including climbing the Great Wall of China, walking the Kokoda Track and competing in not one but two Ironman competitions – this book unmasks the real Turia: funny, fierce, intelligent, flawed.

With the benefit of hindsight and five years’ worth of getting of wisdom, Turia is only now able to account for how she prevailed where others might have faltered. And for the first time, in this book we get to know the people who – by Turia’s own admission – made her recovery possible.

Unmasked will reveal the woman behind the headlines, and in so doing, uncover the grace, humour and inner-steel that gets Turia Pitt through every day – and which leaves the rest of us watching on in amazement.


 

White Queen Quarterly Essay7. Quarterly Essay: The White Queen (David Marr)

Most Australians despise what Pauline Hanson stands for, yet politics in this country is now orbiting around One Nation.

In this timely Quarterly Essay, David Marr looks at Australia’s politics of fear, resentment and race. Who votes One Nation, and why? How much of this is due to inequality? How much to racism? How should the major parties respond to anti-immigrant and anti-Muslim voices? What damage do Australia’s new entrepreneurs of hate inflict on the nation?

Written with drama and wit, this is a ground-breaking look at politics and prejudice by one of Australia’s best writers.

“This woman went to prison, danced the cha-cha on national television for a couple of years, and failed so often at the ballot box she became a running joke. But the truth is she never left us. She was always knocking on the door. Most of those defeats at the polls were close-run things. For twenty years political leaders appeased Hanson’s followers while working to keep her out of office. The first strategy tainted Australian politics. The second eventually failed. So she’s with us again – the Kabuki make-up, that mop of red hair and the voice telling us what we already know: ‘I’m fed up.’” —David Marr


 

Mrs Kelly8. Mrs Kelly (Grantlee Kieza)

When Ned Kelly’s mother, Ellen, arrived in Melbourne in 1841 aged nine, British convict ships were still dumping their unhappy cargo in what was then known as the colony of New South Wales. By the time she died aged ninety-one in 1923, having outlived seven of her twelve children, motor cars plied the highway near her bush home north of Melbourne, and Australia was a modern, sovereign nation.

Like so many pioneering women, Ellen, the wife of a convict, led a life of great hardship. Born in Ireland during a time of entrenched poverty and sectarian violence, she was a mother of seven when her husband died after months in a police lock-up. She lived through famine and drought, watched her babies die, listened through the prison wall while her eldest son was hanged and saw the charred remains of another of her children who’d died in a shoot-out with police. One son became Australia’s most infamous (and ultimately most celebrated) outlaw; another became a highly decorated policeman, an honorary member of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and a worldwide star on the rodeo circuit. Through it all, ‘the notorious Mrs Kelly’, as she was dubbed by Victoria’s Assistant Police Commissioner, survived as best she could, like so many pioneering women of the time.

By bestselling biographer Grantlee Kieza, Mrs Kelly is the astonishing story of one of Australia’s most notorious women and her wild family, but it’s also the story of the making of Australia, from struggling colony and backwater to modern nation.


Beyond the Rock9. Beyond The Rock (Janelle Mcculoch)

2017 marks the 50th anniversary of Joan Lindsay’s writing of Picnic at Hanging Rock

In the winter of 1966, at sixty-nine years of age, Lady Joan Lindsay sat down and wrote a short novel about a group of upper-class schoolgirls from a prestigious ladies’ college who disappear while on a country picnic in the summer of 1900. The result was Picnic at Hanging Rock, a literary mystery that has endured for half a century.

Beyond the Rock looks at not just the myth of Picnic and how it has become part of Australia’s culture, but also the story behind it. It examines Joan Lindsay’s enigmatic life, much of which she kept secret from the world, including her childhood, her complex marriage to Daryl Lindsay of the famous Lindsay family of artists, their enduring love and unconventional bohemian life, and her life at Mulberry Hill, the Lindsays’ own Arcadia deep in the Victorian countryside.

This is the story of one of Australia’s most famous novels, and the author who kept its secrets until she died.


Fabulous Flying Mrs Miller10. The Fabulous Flying Mrs Miller (Carol Baxter)

Petite, glamorous and beguiling, Jessie ‘Chubbie’ Miller was one remarkable woman … flyer, thrill seeker, heartbreaker. No adventure was too wild for her, no danger too extreme. And all over the world men adored her.

When the young Jessie left suburban Melbourne and her newspaperman husband in 1927, little did she know that she’d become the first woman to complete an England to Australia flight (with a black silk gown thrown into her small flight bag, just in case), or fly the first air race for women with Amelia Earhart, or that she would disappear over the Florida Straits feared lost forever only to charm her way to a rescue. Nor could she have predicted that five years later she’d find herself at the centre of one of the most notorious and controversial murder trials in United States history. And this all began with something as ridiculously mundane as a pat of butter.

The Fabulous Flying Mrs Miller is a spellbinding story of an extraordinary woman – an international celebrity during the golden age of aviation – and her passionate and spirited life.


fightlikeagirl11. Fight Like A Girl (Clementine Ford)

A friend recently told me that the things I write are powerful for her because they have the effect of making her feel angry instead of just empty. I want to do this for all women and young girls – to take the emptiness and numbness they feel about being a girl in this world and turn it into rage and power. I want to teach all of them how to FIGHT LIKE A GIRL.

Online sensation, fearless feminist heroine and scourge of trolls and misogynists everywhere, Clementine Ford is a beacon of hope and inspiration to thousands of Australian women and girls. Her incendiary debut Fight Like A Girl is an essential manifesto for feminists new, old and soon-to-be, and exposes just how unequal the world continues to be for women. Crucially, it is a call to arms for all women to rediscover the fury that has been suppressed by a society that still considers feminism a threat.

Fight Like A Girl will make you laugh, cry and scream. But above all it will make you demand and fight for a world in which women have real equality and not merely the illusion of it.


Black Emu12. Dark Emu (Bruce Pascoe)

***2016 NSW Premier’s Literary Awards Indigenous Writers Prize Joint Winner***

Dark Emu puts forward an argument for a reconsideration of the hunter-gatherer tag for precolonial Aboriginal Australians. The evidence insists that Aboriginal people right across the continent were using domesticated plants, sowing, harvesting, irrigating and storing – behaviours inconsistent with the hunter-gatherer tag. Gerritsen and Gammage in their latest books support this premise but Pascoe takes this further and challenges the hunter-gatherer tag as a convenient lie.

Almost all the evidence comes from the records and diaries of the Australian explorers, impeccable sources.


Insomniac City13. Insomniac City (Bill Hayes)

Bill Hayes came to New York City in 2009 with a one-way ticket and only the vaguest idea of how he would get by. But, at forty-eight years old, having spent decades in San Francisco, he craved change. Grieving over the death of his partner, he quickly discovered the profound consolations of the city’s incessant rhythms, the sight of the Empire State Building against the night sky, and New Yorkers themselves, kindred souls that Hayes, a lifelong insomniac, encountered on late-night strolls with his camera.

And he unexpectedly fell in love again, with his friend and neighbor, the writer and neurologist Oliver Sacks, whose exuberance–“I don’t so much fear death as I do wasting life,” he tells Hayes early on–is captured in funny and touching vignettes throughout. What emerges is a portrait of Sacks at his most personal and endearing, from falling in love for the first time at age seventy-five to facing illness and death (Sacks died of cancer in August 2015). Insomniac City is both a meditation on grief and a celebration of life. Filled with Hayes’s distinctive street photos of everyday New Yorkers, the book is a love song to the city and to all who have felt the particular magic and solace it offers.


After14. After (Nikki Gemmell)

Australia’s bravest and most honest writer explores the devastating aftermath of her elderly mother’s decision to end her own life.

Nikki Gemmell’s world changed forever in October 2015 when the body of her elderly mother was found and it became clear she had decided to end her own life. After the immediate shock and devastation came the guilt and the horror, for Nikki, her family, relatives and friends. No note was left, so the questions that Elayn’s death raised were endless. Was the decision an act of independence or the very opposite? Was it a desperate act driven by hopelessness and anger, or was her euthanasia a reasoned act of empowerment?

After is the story of Elayn Gemmell – and the often difficult, prickly relationship between mothers and daughters, and how that changes over time. As anguished as it truthful, as powerful as it is profound, After is about life, death, elderly parents, mothers and daughters, hurt and healing, and about how little, sometimes, we know the ones we love the most.

A deeply intimate, fiercely beautiful, blazingly bold and important book.


 

Everywhere I look15. Everywhere I Look (Helen Garner)

I pedal over to Kensington just after dark. As I roll along the lane towards the railway underpass, a young Asian woman on her way home from the station walks out of the tunnel towards me. After she passes there’s a stillness, a moment of silent freshness that feels like spring.

Helen Garner is one of Australia’s greatest writers. Her short non-fiction has enormous range. Spanning fifteen years of work, Everywhere I Look is a book full of unexpected moments, sudden shafts of light, piercing intuition, flashes of anger and incidental humour. It takes us from backstage at the ballet to the trial of a woman for the murder of her newborn baby. It moves effortlessly from the significance of moving house to the pleasure of re-reading Pride and Prejudice.

Everywhere I Look includes Garner’s famous and controversial essay on the insults of age, her deeply moving tribute to her mother and extracts from her diaries, which have been part of her working life for as long as she has been a writer. Everywhere I Look glows with insight. It is filled with the wisdom of life.


8 week blood sugar diet16. Eight Week Blood Sugar Diet (Michael Mosley)

Everywhere we look in the world today, we are encouraged to treat ourselves to foods and drinks that are damaging our bodies. Eating low-quality carbohydrates produces a constant overload of sugar in our blood stream that furs up the arteries and piles fat into our internal organs. The result has been a doubling in the number of type-2 diabetics over the last few decades, as well as a surge in those with the potentially hazardous condition, pre-diabetes.

It is now known that even moderately elevated blood sugar levels can trigger a range of life-threatening diseases, including cancer, heart disease and dementia. Scientists in the UK have recently made a revolutionary discovery. They have not only identified an important cause of type-2 diabetes but have demonstrated in medical trials that you can prevent and even reverse the condition.

In this book Dr Michael Mosley, the medical journalist who alerted the world to the benefits of intermittent fasting draws on the work of Professor Roy Taylor – one of the UK’s foremost diabetes experts – to present a radical new solution to ‘diabesity’. He explains the science of how and why rapid weight loss combats blood sugar problems, and offers a clear, precise plan – complete with delicious, healthy recipes and menu plans – to enable you to regain your health and then stay on track – medication free. As Dr Mosley says, it is never too late to act…


basics_to_brilliance_17. Basics To Brilliance (Donna Hay)

Donna believes that, just like anything you want to be good at, mastering the basics is how you build confidence. So, in this book, she’s sharing all her favourite, tried and true recipes – think the perfect tender steak, golden roast chicken, crispy pork belly, her nan’s sponge cake, and of course the fudgiest brownies! Each basic recipe is followed by clever variations and simple flavour change-ups, so one recipe becomes many and your repertoire naturally grows. Take Donna’s ‘no-fail meringue mixture’ – once mastered, this basic recipe can be tweaked to be turned into the perfect pavlova; divinely flavoured salted caramel, chocolate, rosewater and pistachio, and raspberry meringues for an elegant afternoon tea; or a silky smooth and tangy lemon meringue pie for a divine dessert for a dinner party.

This is your ultimate guide to being brilliant in the kitchen!


Kitchen Garden Cooking Companion18. Kitchen Garden Companion (Stephanie Alexander)

This is the ultimate garden-to-table guide from one of Australia’s most highly regarded food writers.

Authoritative and distinctly personal, the book offers detailed garden and kitchen notes for 73 vegetables, herbs and fruits, along with 250 delicious recipes. Just as The Cook’s Companion inspired a generation to rediscover the pleasures of the kitchen, Stephanie Alexander’s Kitchen Garden Companion will revolutionise the way we think about sourcing, growing and sharing our food.


 

Full Bore19. Full Bore (William McInnnes)

A chance encounter in an auction house is the jumping-off point for William’s inimitable take on our sport-obsessed nation, Australian popular culture and the artefacts and memorabilia that both make us cringe with recognition and laugh with warm affection. His trademark humour and anecdotes litter this collection, making it a true delight.

These are truly Aussie stories: about us, and about the things – and the people – in our lives.

William McInnes, one of Australia’s best-loved entertainers and authors, takes a look at the Aussie obsession with sports and pop culture.


 

Annie's Farmhouse Kitchen20. Annie’s Farmhouse Kitchen (Annie Smithers)

Annie’s Farmhouse Kitchen is a window on the bucolic world of acclaimed Victorian chef Annie Smithers. A handsome, gifty package, it includes a best-of selection of three and four-course menus collected by Annie over the three years of her restaurant, du Fermier, in Trentham. While part of du Fermier’s appeal is undeniably its charming central Victorian location, this farmhouse-style eatery is the sort of place intrepid food lovers might equally stumble across in rural France or Dorset or California.

Annie’s food is classic French Provincial, presented with a distinct pared back, accessible aesthetic (no fuss, with preparation, anyone can do this!), and determined very much by whatever is thriving in her rambling home vegetable garden in Malmsbury. As well as being fully illustrated with delightful watercolours by Robin Cowcher – meet the cat ‘Kitten’, meet the geese, meet the dog Tommy – Annie’s Farmhouse Kitchen will also include photographs that offer another valuable visual dimension to this compelling package.

In addition to seasonal recipes (four menus per season), Annie’s Farmhouse Kitchen will present readers with four standout feasts: deep mid-winter; summer solstice; spring bounty; and autumn harvest. Annie’s distinct voice will feature throughout – both guiding readers with advice about getting the best results from her recipes (what went wrong? what about leftovers? why, exactly, is this pastry so good?), and via occasional entertaining vignettes that tell the story of the daily challenges and victories inevitably associated with running a successful small restaurant in a country town – solo.

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