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SEPTEMBER NEW RELEASES

FICTION

Wife and the WidowThe Wife and the Widow
Christian White

Set against the backdrop of an eerie island town in the dead of winter, The Wife and the Widow is a mystery/thriller told from two perspectives: Kate, a widow whose grief is compounded by what she learns about her dead husband’s secret life; and Abby, an island local whose world is turned upside down when she’s forced to confront the evidence that her husband is a murderer. But nothing on this island is quite as it seems, and only when these women come together can they discover the whole story about the men in their lives.

Brilliant and beguiling, The Wife and the Widow takes you to a cliff edge and asks the question: how well do we really know the people we love?


 

Nothing VenturedNothing Ventured
Jeffrey Archer

This is not a detective story, this is a story about the making of a detective…

William Warwick has always wanted to be a detective, and decides, much to his father’s dismay, that rather than become a barrister like his father, Sir Julian Warwick QC, and his sister Grace, he will join London’s Metropolitan Police Force.

After graduating from university, William begins a career that will define his life: from his early months on the beat under the watchful eye of his first mentor, Constable Fred Yates, to his first high-stakes case as a fledgling detective in Scotland Yard’s arts and antiquities squad. Investigating the theft of a priceless Rembrandt painting from the Fitzmolean Museum, he meets Beth Rainsford, a research assistant at the gallery who he falls hopelessly in love with, even as Beth guards a secret of her own that she’s terrified will come to light.

While William follows the trail of the missing masterpiece, he comes up against suave art collector Miles Faulkner and his brilliant lawyer, Booth Watson QC, who are willing to bend the law to breaking point to stay one step ahead of William. Meanwhile, Miles Faulkner’s wife, Christina, befriends William, but whose side is she really on?

Nothing Ventured heralds the start of a brand new series in the style of Jeffrey Archer’s number one Sunday Times bestselling The Clifton Chronicles: telling the story of the life of William Warwick – as a family man and a detective who will battle throughout his career against a powerful criminal nemesis. Through twists, triumph and tragedy, this series will show that William Warwick is destined to become one of Jeffrey Archer’s most enduring legacies.


 

Wolfe IslandWolfe Island
Lucy Treloar

Kitty Hawke, the last inhabitant of a dying island sinking into the wind-lashed Chesapeake Bay, has resigned herself to annihilation…

Until one night her granddaughter blows ashore in the midst of a storm, desperate, begging for sanctuary. For years, Kitty has kept herself to herself – with only the company of her wolfdog, Girl – unconcerned by the world outside, or perhaps avoiding its worst excesses. But blood cannot be turned away in times like these. And when trouble comes following her granddaughter, no one is more surprised than Kitty to find she will fight to save her as fiercely as her name suggests…

A richly imagined and mythic parable of home and kin that cements Lucy Treloar’s place as one of our most acclaimed novelists.


 

Old LieThe Old Lie
Claire G. Coleman

Shane Daniels and Romany Zetz have been drawn into a war that is not their own. Lives will be destroyed, families will be torn apart. Trust will be broken.  When the war is over, some will return to a changed world. Will they discover that glory is a lie?

Claire G. Coleman’s new novel takes us to a familiar world to again ask us what we have learned from the past. The Old Lie might not be quite what you expect. A thrilling and ambitious new novel from the author of the bestselling and prize-winning Terra Nullius.


 

Girl Who Lived TwiceThe Girl Who Lived Twice (Millenium #6)
David Lagercrantz

“What will you do now?”
“I shall be the hunter and not the hunted”

The girl with the dragon tattoo is finally ready to confront her nemesis, the only woman who is evidently and in many ways her match. Salander will not wait to be hunted. When she strikes it will be a double blow: vengeance for recent atrocities, and the settling of lifelong scores.

For months now Salander has been closing in on her target. She has moved from Stockholm, her hair is newly styled, her piercings are gone. She could pass for any other businesswoman. But not all businesswomen have a Beretta Cheetah beneath their jacket. They do not wield the lethal power of a hacker’s genius. They do not carry scars and tattoos to remind them that they have survived the unsurvivable.

The new episode in David Lagercrantz’s acclaimed, internationally bestselling continuation of Stieg Larsson’s Dragon Tattoo series is a thrilling ride that scales the heights of Everest and plunges the depths of Russian troll factories. It begins with the discovery of Mikael Blomkvist’s number at Millennium magazine in the pocket of an unidentified homeless man who died with the name of a government minister on his lips.

Blomkvist, at extreme risk to himself, tracks down his old friend and will protect her as far as he can. But he is powerless to crush her enemies on his own.

And for Lisbeth Salander, the personal is always political – and deadly.


 

Ten Thousand Doors of JanuaryTen Thousand Doors of January
Alix E. Harrow

Every Story Opens a Door

In a house filled with exotic treasures, January Scaller feels all too similar to the artefacts that decorate the shelves: a treasured object, carefully maintained yet utterly out of place. Largely ignored by her guardian, she spends her days reading about all the far-flung places she can only dream of visiting.

But her quiet existence is shattered when she stumbles across a strange book. A book that carries the scent of other worlds and tells a tale of secret doors, of love, adventure and danger. Each page reveals impossible truths about the world and January discovers a story that might just be the key to unlocking the secrets of her past.


 

How the Dead SpeakHow the Dead Speak
Val McDermid

After an explosive case that forced Tony Hill and Carol Jordan to reassess everything they thought they knew about right and wrong, both are dealing with the fallout in their own separate ways. While Tony must pay the price for his actions, Carol is conducting investigations into suspected miscarriages of justice.

But when a shocking discovery is made on a construction site, and skeletal remains are found to belong to a killer who is supposedly alive and in prison, suddenly, Tony and Carol are brought into each other’s orbit once again . . .

The next eagerly anticipated, electrifying thriller from number one bestseller and queen of crime, Val McDermid, featuring the unforgettable Tony Hill and Carol Jordan.


 

Rich Man's HouseThe Rich Man’s House
Andrew McGahan

In the freezing Antarctic waters south of Tasmania, a mountain was discovered in 1642 by the seafaring explorer Gerrit Jansz. Not just any mountain but one that Jansz estimated was an unbelievable height of twenty-five thousand metres.

In 2016, at the foot of this unearthly mountain, a controversial and ambitious ‘dream home’, the Observatory, is painstakingly constructed by an eccentric billionaire – the only man to have ever reached the summit.

Rita Gausse, estranged daughter of the architect who designed the Observatory is surprised, upon her father’s death, to be invited to the isolated mansion to meet the famously reclusive owner, Walter Richman. But from the beginning, something doesn’t feel right. Why is Richman so insistent that she come? What does he expect of her?

When cataclysmic circumstances intervene to trap Rita and a handful of other guests in the Observatory, cut off from the outside world, she slowly begins to learn the unsettling – and ultimately horrifying – answers.

The Rich Man’s House, Andrew McGahan’s eleventh and final novel, is a gripping and unique thriller.


 

Dutch HouseThe Dutch House
Ann Patchett

Danny Conroy grows up in the Dutch House, a lavish folly in small-town Pennsylvania taken on by his property developer father. Though his father is distant and his mother is absent, Danny has his beloved sister Maeve: Maeve, with her wall of black hair, her delicacy, her brilliance. Life is comfortable and coherent, played out under the watchful eyes of the house’s former owners in the frames of their oil paintings, or under the cover of the draperies around the window seat in Maeve’s room.

Then one day their father brings Andrea home: Andrea, small and neat, a dark hat no bigger than a saucer pinned over a twist of her fair hair. Though they cannot know it, Andrea’s advent to the Dutch House sows the seed of the defining loss of Danny and Maeve’s lives. Her arrival will exact a banishment: a banishment whose reverberations will echo for the rest of their lives.

For all that the world is open to him, for all that he can accumulate, for all that life is full, Danny and his sister are drawn back time and again to the place they can never enter, knocking in vain on the locked door of the past. For behind the mystery of their own enforced exile is that of their mother’s self-imposed one: an absence more powerful than any presence they have known.

Told with Ann Patchett’s inimitable blend of wit and heartbreak, The Dutch House is a story of family, betrayal, love, responsibility and sacrifice; of the powerful bonds of place and time that magnetize and repel us for our whole lives, and the lives of those who survive us.


 

The TruantsThe Truants
Kate Weinberg

People disappear when they most want to be seen.

Jess Walker, middle child of a middle class family, has perfected the art of vanishing in plain sight. But when she arrives at a concrete university campus under flat, grey, East Anglian skies, her world flares with colour.

Drawn into a tightly-knit group of rule breakers – led by their maverick teacher, Lorna Clay – Jess begins to experiment with a new version of herself. But the dynamic between the friends begins to darken as they share secrets, lovers and finally a tragedy. Soon Jess is thrown up against the question she fears most: what is the true cost of an extraordinary life?


 

DarkdawnDarkdawn (Nevernight #3)
Jay Kristoff

Mia Corvere, gladiatii, escaped slave and infamous assassin, is on the run.

After the greatest games in Godsgrave’s history ended with the most audacious murders in the history of the Itreyan Republic, Mia finds herself pursued by Blades of the Red Church and soldiers of the Luminatii legion. She may never escape the City of Bridges and Bones alive.

Her mentor Mercurio is now in the clutches of her enemies. Her own family wishes her dead. And her nemesis, Consul Julius Scaeva, stands but a breath from total dominance over the Republic.

But beneath the city, a dark secret awaits. Together with her lover Ashlinn, brother Jonnen and a mysterious benefactor returned from beyond the veil of death, she must undertake a perilous journey across the Republic, seeking the final answer to the riddle of her life. Truedark approaches.

Night is falling on the Republic for perhaps the final time.


 

A Single ThreadA Single Thread
Tracy Chevalier

It is 1932, and the losses of the First World War are still keenly felt. Violet Speedwell, mourning for both her fiancé and her brother and regarded by society as a ‘surplus woman’ unlikely to marry, resolves to escape her suffocating mother and strike out alone.

A new life awaits her in Winchester. Yes, it is one of draughty boarding-houses and sidelong glances at her naked ring finger from younger colleagues; but it is also a life gleaming with independence and opportunity. Violet falls in with the broderers, a disparate group of women charged with embroidering kneelers for the Cathedral, and is soon entwined in their lives and their secrets. As the almost unthinkable threat of a second Great War appears on the horizon Violet collects a few secrets of her own that could just change everything…

Warm, vivid and beautifully orchestrated, A Single Thread reveals one of our finest modern writers at the peak of her powers.


 

The TestamentsThe Testaments
Margaret Atwood

When the van door slammed on Offred’s future at the end of The Handmaid’s Tale, readers had no way of telling what lay ahead.

With The Testaments, the wait is over.

Margaret Atwood’s sequel picks up the story 15 years after Offred stepped into the unknown, with the explosive testaments of three female narrators from Gilead.  Shortlisted for the 2019 Booker Prize.


 

QuichotteQuichotte
Salman Rushdie

Quichotte, an ageing travelling salesman obsessed with TV, is on a quest for love. Unfortunately, his daily diet of reality TV, sitcoms, films, soaps, comedies and dramas has distorted his ability to separate fantasy from reality. He wishes an imaginary son into existence, while obsessively writing love letters to a celebrity he knows only through his screen. Quichotte’s story is narrated by Brother, a mediocre spy novelist in the midst of a midlife crisis, triggered in part by a fall-out with his Sister. As the stories of Brother and Quichotte ingeniously intertwine, Salman Rushdie takes us on a wild, picaresque journey through a world on the edge of moral and spiritual collapse.

Quichotte is one of the world’s great storytellers at his exuberant best, in a book that highlights the instability of the world we live in and speaks to an era when fact is often indiscernible from fiction.  Shortlisted for the 2019 Booker Prize.


 

NON FICTION

How Powerful We AReHow Powerful We Are
Sally Rugg

Even if you’re not an activist (yet), at a time when the news is written for clicks and elections are fought with three-word slogans, it’s crucial to preserve some record of events that isn’t ‘fake news’ or political spin. In part, this book is my attempt to counter the re-writing of how Australia achieved one of the most significant social changes in a generation.

Sally Rugg is one of Australia’s most influential campaigners for social change. How Powerful We Are is her manifesto for championing what you believe is right.

In these pages Sally will teach you some of the things she learnt on the marriage equality campaign: how to develop a strategy, how to frame your messages, how to get your campaign to the media, how to build community power. And she’ll share with you the much harder lessons learnt: the consequences of campaign decisions; how to weather criticism and harassment from every angle; and how, in mass campaign movements, nothing is black and white.


 

Whole Fish CookbookThe Whole Fish Cookbook
Josh Niland

We all want to eat more fish, but who wants to bother spending the time, effort and money cooking that same old salmon fillet on repeat when you could be trying something new and utterly delicious?

In The Whole Fish Cookbook, Sydney’s groundbreaking seafood chef Josh Niland reveals a completely new way to think about all aspects of fish cookery. From sourcing and butchering to dry ageing and curing, it challenges everything we thought we knew about the subject and invites readers to see fish for what it really is – an amazing, complex source of protein that can, and should, be treated with exactly the same nose-to-tail reverence as meat.

Featuring more than 60 recipes for dozens of fish species ranging from Cod Liver Pate on Toast, Fish Cassoulet and Roast Fish Bone Marrow to – essentially – the Perfect Fish and Chips, The Whole Fish Cookbook will soon have readers seeing that there is so much more to a fish than just the fillet and that there are more than just a handful of fish in the sea.


 

Melbourne Pocket PrecinctsMelbourne Pocket Precincts
Dale Campisi & Brady Michaels

Melbourne is a city of proud locals, and visitors who wish they lived here. Whether by bike or by tram, explore the lively streets and beautiful green spaces; it’s no wonder Melbourne has long been considered one of the most livable cities in the world. Culture reigns supreme with world-class museums, galleries, street art and a topnotch food and coffee scene. Browse with the Collins Street elite or vintage shop-hop through Collingwood and Prahran, then finish the day with a fine wine on one of the CBD’s many rooftop bars.

Melbourne Pocket Precincts is your curated guide to the city’s best cultural, shopping, eating and drinking experiences, from the grunge of Fitzroy to the seaside vibes of St Kilda. As well as detailed reviews and maps for major attractions through to hidden gems, this guide includes a selection of field trips encouraging you to venture outside the city to the Dandenong Ranges and Yarra Valley vineyards, the picturesque Mornington Peninsula, the iconic Great Ocean Road and the historic Goldfields. Slip this guide into your pocket and head off on an adventure, experiencing the coolest places in Melbourne and surrounds, like a local.


Almost Lost ArtsAlmost Lost Arts
Emily Freidenrich

Since the Industrial Revolution, humans have been mechanising and digitising processes previously done by hand. But craftsmanship isn’t lost to the footnotes of history. Meet the makers, fixers, and collectors dedicated to preserving traditional handicrafts. Brittany Nicole Cox repairs antique clocks; Anita Rodríguez and Joanna Keane Lopez build and preserve traditional adobe structures; Simon Vernon roves the British countryside drawing maps by hand; Lee Eun Bum maintains a ceramic tradition from tenth-century Korea.

Almost Lost Arts pays tribute to these artisans, celebrating human ingenuity and tactile beauty. Twenty in-depth profiles and stunning full-colour photography transport the reader to workshops across the globe, from Kyoto to Oaxaca, and from Milan to Tennessee. Two essays – by a calligraphy expert and the curator of Harvard’s Forbes Pigment Library, respectively – explore the experience of engaging deeply with tradition. The book is lovingly curated by Emily Freidenrich and features a deluxe three-piece case with foil stamping.


 

The GirlsThe Girls
Chloe Higgins

In 2005, Chloe Higgins was seventeen years old. She and her mother, Rhonda, stayed home so that she could revise for her exams while her two younger sisters Carlie and Lisa went skiing with their father. On the way back from their trip, their car veered off the highway, flipped on its side and burst into flames. Both her sisters were killed. Their father walked away from the accident with only minor injuries.

This book is about what happened next.

In a memoir of breathtaking power, Chloe Higgins describes the heartbreaking aftermath of that one terrible day. It is a story of grieving, and learning to leave grief behind, for anyone who has ever loved, and lost.


 

Devil's GripThe Devil’s Grip
Neal Drinnan

Seven shots ring out in the silence of Victoria’s rolling Barrabool Hills. As the final recoil echoes through the paddocks, a revered sheep-breeding dynasty comes to a bloody and inglorious end.

No one could have anticipated the orgy of violence that wiped out three generations of the Wettenhall family, much less the lurid scandals about Darcy Wettenhall, the man behind the world famous Stanbury sheep stud, that would emerge from the aftermath.

Almost three decades later, the web of secrets and lies that led to this bizarre and seemingly motiveless murder spree are unravelled with the help of Bob Perry, Darcy Wettenhall’s secret lover for a decade prior to his murder.

From the bucolic majesty, privilege and snobbery of the Western District’s prized pastoral lands and dynasties to the bleak, loveless underworld of orphanages, rodeo stables and homeless shelters, The Devil’s Grip is a courageous and thought-provoking meditation on the fragility of reputation, the folly of deception and the power of shame.


 

Animal LanguagesAnimal Languages: The Secret Conversations of the Living World
Eva Meijar

Dolphins and parrots call each other by their names. Fork tailed drongos mimic the calls of other animals to scare them away and then steal their dinner. In the songs of many species of birds, and in skin patterns of squid, we find grammatical structures…

If you are lucky, you might meet an animal that wants to talk to you. If you are even luckier, you might meet an animal that takes the time and effort to get to know you. Such relationships can teach us not only about the animal in question, but also about language and about ourselves.

From how prairie dogs describe intruders in detail — including their size, shape, speed and the colour of their hair and T-shirts — to how bats like to gossip, to the impressive greeting rituals of monogamous seabirds, Animal Languages is a fascinating and philosophical exploration of the ways animals communicate with each other, and with us.

Researchers are discovering that animals have rich and complex languages with grammatical and structural rules that allow them to strategise, share advice, give warnings, show love and gossip amongst themselves. Animal Languages will reveal this surprising hidden social life and show you how to talk with the animals.


Courtyard LivingCourtyard Living
Charmaine Chan

Courtyards have long played an important function in residential design, regulating light, shade and the use of space. With centuries of tradition as inspiration, contemporary architects are now realizing courtyard living afresh. This lavish survey of 25 residences across the Asia-Pacific region features homes from Australia, Taiwan, Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, the Philippines, Singapore, India, Vietnam and Sri Lanka.

Structured by courtyard function, the book consists of five chapters – on privacy; social spaces; sightlines; air, light and shade; and blurring boundaries – that are richly illustrated with photography as well as architectural illustrations showing the position of the courtyard within the floor plan.

Showcasing the unique lifestyle opportunities afforded by contemporary courtyard design, this is an inspirational resource for anyone interested in indoor-outdoor living.


 

Night FishingNight Fishing
Vicki Hastrich

Vicki Hastrich takes the reader on a stunning voyage through her writer’s life and across her chosen patch: the private byways of Brisbane Water, north of Sydney, where she has spent much of her life.

Hastrich’s ability to draw on her own experience and to fuse her intimate, loving knowledge of a tiny arena of Australia’s natural world with the grand influence of ideas from throughout civilization – from the Baroque to the American Western, from artists as diverse as Zane Grey, Tiepolo and Goya – make this collection a truly original and deeply pleasurable reading experience.

Night Fishing unfolds as a series of expeditions or essays, undertaken in the spirit of the philosopher scientist. All the while, slowly, thoughtfully, Hastrich reveals the ordinary and remarkable detail of her life, from her childhood by the sea to her life as a camera operator for the ABC, as a historian and amateur marine biologist, and as a single woman exploring her small stretch of water.

The result is entirely new, entirely fresh and profoundly captivating. Night Fishing is a tonic for those of us who have forgotten how to slow down, how to look around, how to be part of our natural world. It will take its place alongside classics of observation and nature by David Malouf, Tim Winton and Annie Dillard.


 

Year of the MonkeyYear of the Monkey
Patti Smith

Following a run of New Year’s concerts at San Francisco’s legendary Fillmore, Patti Smith finds herself tramping the coast of Santa Cruz, about to embark on a year of solitary wandering. Unfettered by logic or time, she draws us into her private wonderland, with no design yet heeding signs, including a talking sign that looms above her, prodding and sparring like the Cheshire Cat. In February, a surreal lunar year begins, bringing with it unexpected turns, heightened mischief, and inescapable sorrow. In a stranger’s words, “Anything is possible: after all, it’s the year of the monkey.” For Patti Smith – inveterately curious, always exploring, tracking thoughts, writing the year evolves as one of reckoning with the changes in life’s gyre: with loss, aging, and a dramatic shift in the political landscape of America.

Smith melds the Western landscape with her own dreamscape. Taking us from Southern California to the Arizona desert; to a Kentucky farm as the amanuensis of a friend in crisis; to the hospital room of a valued mentor; and by turns to remembered and imagined places – this haunting memoir blends fact and fiction with poetic mastery. The unexpected happens; grief and disillusionment. But as Patti Smith heads toward a new decade in her own life, she offers this balm to the reader: her wisdom, wit, gimlet eye, and above all, a rugged hope of a better world.

Riveting, elegant, often humorous, illustrated by Smith’s signature Polaroids, Year of the Monkey is a moving and original work, a touchstone for our turbulent times.


 

The AnarchyThe Anarchy: Relentless Rise of the East India Company
William Dalrymple

In August 1765 the East India Company defeated and captured the young Mughal emperor and forced him to set up in his richest provinces a new government run by English traders who collected taxes through means of a vast and ruthless private army.

The creation of this new government marked the moment that the East India Company ceased to be a conventional international trading corporation, dealing in silks and spices, and became something much more unusual: an aggressive colonial power in the guise of a multinational business. In less than half a century it had trained up a private security force of around 260,000 men – twice the size of the British army – and had subdued an entire subcontinent, conquering first Bengal and finally, in 1803, the Mughal capital of Delhi itself. The Company’s reach stretched relentlessly until almost all of India south of the Himalayas was effectively ruled from a boardroom in London.

The Anarchy tells the remarkable story of how one of the world’s most magnificent empires disintegrated and came to be replaced by a dangerously unregulated private company, based thousands of miles overseas and answerable only to its shareholders. In his most ambitious and riveting book to date, William Dalrymple tells the story of the East India Company as it has never been told before, unfolding a timely cautionary tale of the first global corporate power.

Three hundred and fifteen years after its founding, with a corporate Mogul now sitting in the White House, the story of the East India Company has never been more current.


 

About a GirlAbout a Girl
Rebekah Robertson

In 2000, Rebekah gave birth to twin boys, George and Harry. But as they grew older, their preferences began to show, and by the age of three it was clear Georgie was drawn to anything that was pretty or had a skirt that could swirl.

Before long Georgie was insisting that she was a girl and became distressed that she had to hide who she really was when she began school. Soon the bullying started and she would come home in floods of tears, begging her mother to help her.

Rebekah and her husband, conflicted about how to proceed and overwhelmed by fear, united in their determination to help her live freely and fearlessly. To ensure Georgie had access to medical support they sought permission for her to begin puberty-blocking medication. Their case was the start of the long road to justice for transgender children in Australia and became the basis of the 2013 landmark decision to remove the Family Court’s jurisdiction.

Georgie has gone on to become one of the brightest stars of the Australian youth leadership landscape through her advocacy work. And Rebekah founded Transcend, a support network for transgender kids and their families in Australia.

Part memoir and part inspirational message of hope for those navigating a similar path, About a Girl is a thought-provoking and profoundly moving true story. Above all, it is a celebration of family and the values that unite us all.


 

Sand TalkSand Talk: How Indigenous Thinking Can Save the World
Tyson Yunkaporta

What happens when global systems are viewed from an Indigenous perspective? How does it affect the way we see history, money, power and learning? Could it change the world?

This remarkable book is about everything from echidnas to evolution, cosmology to cooking, sex and science and spirits to Schrodinger’s cat.

Tyson Yunkaporta looks at global systems from an Indigenous perspective. He asks how contemporary life diverges from the pattern of creation. How does this affect us? How can we do things differently?

Sand Talk provides a template for living. It’s about how lines and symbols and shapes can help us make sense of the world. It’s about how we learn and how we remember. It’s about talking to everybody and listening carefully. It’s about finding different ways to look at things.

Most of all it’s about Indigenous thinking, and how it can save the world.


 

First, They Erased Our NameFirst, They Erased Our Name: A Rohingya Speaks
Habiburahman with Sophie Ansel 

Habiburahman was born in 1979 and raised in a small village in western Burma. When he was three years old, the country’s military leader declared that his people, the Rohingya, were not one of the 135 recognised ethnic groups that formed the eight ‘national races’. He was left stateless in his own country.

Since 1982, millions of Rohingya have had to flee their homes as a result of extreme prejudice and persecution. In 2016 and 2017, the government intensified the process of ethnic cleansing, and over 600,000 Rohingya people were forced to cross the border into Bangladesh.

Here, for the first time, a Rohingya speaks up to expose the truth behind this global humanitarian crisis. Through the eyes of a child, we learn about the historic persecution of the Rohingya people and witness the violence Habiburahman endured throughout his life until he escaped the country in 2000, eventually reaching Australia by boat in December 2009. He spent nearly three years in detention centres before being released, and now lives in Melbourne.

First, They Erased Our Name is an urgent, moving memoir about what it feels like to be repressed in one’s own country and a refugee in others. It gives voice to the voiceless.


 

We Are The WeatherWe are the Weather
Jonathan Safran Foer

Most books about the environmental crisis are densely academic, depressingly doom-laden and crammed with impersonal statistics. We are the Weather is different – accessible, immediate and with a single clear solution that individual readers can put into practice straight away.

A significant proportion of global carbon emissions come from farming meat. Giving up meat is incredibly hard and nobody is perfect – but just cutting back is much easier and still has a huge positive effect on the environment. Just changing our dinners – cutting out meat for one meal per day – is enough to change the world.

With his distinctive wit, insight and humanity, Foer frames this essential debate as no one else could, bringing it to vivid and urgent life.


 

Talking to StrangersTalking to Strangers
Malcolm Gladwell

In July 2015, a young black woman named Sandra Bland was pulled over for a minor traffic violation in rural Texas. Minutes later she was arrested and jailed. Three days later, she committed suicide in her cell. What went wrong? Talking to Strangers is all about what happens when we encounter people we don’t know, why it often goes awry, and what it says about us.

How do we make sense of the unfamiliar? Why are we so bad at judging someone, reading a face, or detecting a lie? Why do we so often fail to ‘get’ other people?

Through a series of puzzles, encounters and misunderstandings, from little-known stories to infamous legal cases, Gladwell takes us on a journey through the unexpected. You will read about the spy who spent years undetected at the highest levels of the Pentagon, the man who saw through the fraudster Bernie Madoff, the suicide of the poet Sylvia Plath and the false conviction of Amanda Knox. You will discover that strangers are never simple.

No one shows us who we are like Malcolm Gladwell. Here he sets out to understand why we act the way we do, and how we all might know a little more about those we don’t.


 

On FireOn Fire
Naomi Klein

The fight for a green world is the fight of our lives. And with On Fire, Naomi Klein gives us the ammunition to do it.

In frank, personal terms, she shows us how the only way forward out of a polluted world of our own making is only through policy reform – a concrete set of actions to combat the mounting threat of total environmental catastrophe. What’s needed, she argues, is something with radical verve and guaranteed protections: in other words, a New Deal.

On Fire finds Klein at her most canny and prophetic, and the stakes of our imperiled global situation higher than ever before. In wide-ranging essays reporting from varying stages of ecological crisis – from prescient clarion calls from years ago to our panicked present – Klein wakes us up from our environmental sleepwalk and sets us on a course of potent, necessary action.


 

Chyka CelebrateChyka Celebrate
Chyka Keebaugh

In Chyka Celebrate, Chyka Keebaugh celebrates occasions from around the world and shares tips, inspiration and suggestions for hosting the perfect themed event. Covering occasions as diverse as Chinese New Year, Eid, Jewish New Year, Mother’s Day, Halloween, Thanksgiving, New Year’s Eve and Easter, Chyka shows readers how themed entertaining is done with minimum hassle and at low cost, independent of the location – all in her signature, accessible style.

Organised into thirteen chapters by event, each section provides creative suggestions for decoration, food and drinks, invitations and small gifts, and provides insights into the charming customs common at many of our holidays and festivals. Beautifully photographed and illustrated, Chyka Celebrate is the perfect manual for themed entertaining in style throughout the year.

 

 

 

 

 

2019 Children’s Book Week and Story Writing Competition Winners

We were delighted to kick off our celebrations for Children’s Book Week yesterday with a visit from the lovely Jane Godwin and the announcement of our Story Competition Winners for 2019.  What an absolutely bumper crowd we had?!  Thanks so much to everyone who was able to come down and enjoy the afternoon’s festivities.

CBW2019

Jane Godwin very generously spoke with us about her own writing approach and ideas and gave the kids her Top 10 Tips for Young Writers, which are a great reference for everyone putting their entries together for next year!

Story Competition Winners

We had more than 200 entries this year from Prep through to Year 12 – it is always such a difficult task to whittle all the wonderful stories down to just a few winners.  All entrants receive a certificate of participation, which can be collected in store until the end of October 2019.

This year’s winners and honourable mentions in each age category were as follows:
(click on the winning titles to read the story – use the tool bar at the bottom to scroll through pages)

Lower Primary School (Prep & Year 1)

WINNERS
Illustrations:  Super Cat: Race to the Crown by Hugo Wright
Picture story: The Chocolate Yaks of the Mornington Peninsula by Tyler McClusky
Short story: Sustainaville by Milly Davies

Middle Primary School (Years 2-4)

WINNERS
Poetry: The Magic Box by Luca Broadbent
Picture Story: The Day My Food Fought Back! by Perry McCluskey
Short Story:
1770 by Signe Hardt
Be Careful What You Wish For by Toby Adeney

HONOURABLE MENTIONS
Picture Story:
The Big Holiday by Gwendolin Mapp
Monster Catastrophe by Charlotte Calvert
Short Stories:
The Best Day by Olivia Natoli
The Medallion Thief by Amy Akers

Upper Primary School (Years 5 & 6)

WINNERS
Poetry: Different by Leah Reaper
Tormented Dreams by Faith Hatch
The White Horse by Viola Turchini

HONOURABLE MENTIONS
Trouble in Tango Bay by Sophie Doye
Water by Lilyana
The Odd Friendship by Ilyssa

Lower Secondary School (Years 7-9)

WINNERS
Freedom by Taylor Branford
Hide by Isobel Dymond

HONOURABLE MENTIONS
The Fire That Shook Me by Adam Houben
Welcome to Whiterock by Isabel York

Upper Secondary School (Years 10-12)

No One Knows Riva by Rebecca Shute

Congratulations to ALL ENTRANTS on your wonderful stories – we can’t wait to see what you have for us next year!!

If you’d like to check out the winners and honours list for this year’s Children’s Book Council of Australia Book Awards, you can see them here.  Note that there are usually supply delays for winners and notables following the announcement, but as always we are happy to place special orders if you would like a particular book.

We have limited signed copies of some of Jane Godwin‘s lovely books available in store now (while stocks last).  Her new books Tilly and One Blue Shoe, will be out in October.

AUGUST NEW RELEASES

FICTION

TidelandsTidelands
Philippa Gregory

Midsummer’s Eve, 1648, and England is in the grip of civil war between renegade King and rebellious Parliament. The struggle reaches every corner of the kingdom, even to the remote Tidelands – the marshy landscape of the south coast.

Alinor, a descendant of wise women, crushed by poverty and superstition, waits in the graveyard under the full moon for a ghost who will declare her free from her abusive husband. Instead she meets James, a young man on the run, and shows him the secret ways across the treacherous marsh, not knowing that she is leading disaster into the heart of her life.

Suspected of possessing dark secrets in superstitious times, Alinor’s ambition and determination mark her out from her neighbours. This is the time of witch-mania, and Alinor, a woman without a husband, skilled with herbs, suddenly enriched, arouses envy in her rivals and fear among the villagers, who are ready to take lethal action into their own hands.


 

InlandInland
Tea Obreht

A man searching for a home he can’t find. A woman bound to a home she can’t leave.

Nora is an unflinching frontierswoman awaiting the return of the men in her life – her husband who has gone in search of water for the parched household, and her elder sons who have vanished after an explosive argument. Nora is biding her time with her youngest son, who is convinced that a mysterious beast is stalking the land around their home, and her husband’s seventeen-year-old cousin, who communes with spirits.

Lurie is a former outlaw and a man haunted by ghosts. He sees lost souls who want something from him, and he finds reprieve from their longing in an unexpected relationship that inspires a momentous expedition across the West.

Mythical, lyrical, and sweeping in scope, Inland is grounded in true but little-known history. It showcases all of Tea Obreht’s talents as a writer, as she subverts and reimagines the myths of the American West, making them entirely – and unforgettably – her own.


 

Good Girl Bad GirlGood Girl Bad Girl 
Michael Robotham

The girl with no past…

Six years ago, Evie Cormac was discovered, filthy and half-starved, hiding in a secret room in the aftermath of a shocking crime. Now approaching adulthood, Evie is damaged, self-destructive and has never revealed her true identity.

The boy who survived…

Forensic psychologist Cyrus Haven, a man haunted by his own past, is investigating the death of champion figure-skater Jodie Sheehan. When Cyrus is called upon to assess Evie, she threatens to disrupt the case and destroy his ordered life. Because Evie has a unique and dangerous gift – she knows when someone is lying.

And nobody is telling the truth…


LapseLapse
Sarah Thornton

All it took was a lapse…a momentary lapse…to bring Clementine Jones’ world crashing down. Now she’s living like a hermit in small-town Katinga, coaching the local footy club. She’s supposed to be lying low, but here she is, with her team on the cusp of their first premiership in fifty years—and the whole bloody town counting on her, cheering her on.

So why the hell would her star player quit on the eve of the finals?

It’s a question she wishes she’d left alone. Others are starting to ask questions too—questions about her. Clem’s not the only one with a secret, and as tension builds, the dark violence just below the town’s surface threatens to erupt. Pretty soon there’ll be nowhere left for Clem to hide.


 

The TrespassersThe Trespassers
Meg Mundell

Fleeing their pandemic-stricken homelands, a shipload of migrant workers departs the UK, dreaming of a fresh start in prosperous Australia.

For nine-year-old Cleary Sullivan, deaf for three years, the journey promises adventure and new friendships; for Glaswegian songstress Billie Galloway, it’s a chance to put a shameful mistake firmly behind her; while impoverished English schoolteacher Tom Garnett hopes to set his future on a brighter path.

But when a crew member is found murdered and passengers start falling gravely ill, the Steadfast is plunged into chaos. Thrown together by chance, and each guarding their own secrets, Cleary, Billie and Tom join forces to survive the journey and its aftermath.

The Trespassers is a beguiling novel that explores the consequences of greed, the experience of exile, and the unlikely ways strangers can become the people we hold dear.


 

Second SleepThe Second Sleep
Robert Harris

1468. A young priest, Christopher Fairfax, arrives in a remote Exmoor village to conduct the funeral of his predecessor. The land around is strewn with ancient artifacts – coins, fragments of glass, human bones – which the old parson used to collect. Did his obsession with the past lead to his death?

Fairfax becomes determined to discover the truth. Over the course of the next six days, everything he believes – about himself, his faith and the history of his world – will be tested to destruction.


 

Memory PoliceThe Memory Police
Yoko Ogawa

Hat, ribbon, bird, rose. To the people on the island, a disappeared thing no longer has any meaning. It can be burned in the garden, thrown in the river or handed over to the Memory Police. Soon enough, the island forgets it ever existed.

When a young novelist discovers that her editor is in danger of being taken away by the Memory Police, she desperately wants to save him. For some reason, he doesn’t forget, and it’s becoming increasingly difficult for him to hide his memories. Who knows what will vanish next?

The Memory Police is a beautiful, haunting and provocative fable about the power of memory and the trauma of loss, from one of Japan’s greatest writers.

For readers of The Handmaid’s Tale, Fahrenheit 451 and Nineteen Eighty-Four.


 

Where the dead goWhere the Dead Go
Sarah Bailey

A fifteen-year-old girl has gone missing after a party in the middle of the night. The following morning her boyfriend is found brutally murdered in his home. Was the girl responsible for the murder, or is she also a victim of the killer? But who would want two teenagers dead?

The aftermath of a personal tragedy finds police detective Gemma Woodstock in the coastal town of Fairhaven with her son Ben in tow. She has begged to be part of a murder investigation so she can bury herself in work rather than taking the time to grieve and figure out how to handle the next stage of her life – she now has serious family responsibilities she can no longer avoid. But Gemma also has ghosts she must lay to rest.

Gemma searches for answers, while navigating her son’s grief and trying to overcome the hostility of her new colleagues. As the mystery deepens and old tensions and secrets come to light, Gemma is increasingly haunted by a similar missing persons case she worked on not long before. A case that ended in tragedy and made her question her instincts as a cop. Can she trust herself again?

A riveting thriller by the author of the international bestseller The Dark Lake, winner of both the Ned Kelly Award and the Sisters in Crime Davitt Award for a debut crime novel.


 

See you at the ToxtethSee You at the Toxteth
Peter Corris

For almost four decades Peter Corris was known as ‘the godfather of Australian crime fiction’, and Cliff Hardy has been Australia’s favourite private investigator since he solved his first case in 1980. This selection of stories starts with Cliff’s early days driving round Glebe in his battered Falcon, drinking at the Toxteth Hotel and taking on cases that more often than not leave him as battered as his car. As Cliff becomes older and wiser, he prefers to use his head more than his fists, but the cases are as tricky as ever and Hardy’s clients lead him to the murkiest surroundings.

To further celebrate Peter Corris’s legacy, editor Jean Bedford has also included a selection of his columns on the world of crime and crime writing, along with his ‘ABC of Crime Writing’. From Adultery to Yeti, via Gumshoe, Hit man and The Mob, this entertaining compendium gives a fascinating insight into Peter’s vast knowledge of the genre.


 

Delayed Rays of a StarDelayed Rays of a Star
Amanda Lee Koe

When a photographer captures Marlene Dietrich, Anna May Wong and Leni Riefenstahl in one frame at a party in Berlin in 1928, no one realizes the extent to which their lives will reflect the tumultuous decades that follow.

Marlene crosses the Atlantic to find fame in Hollywood, the town that eats out of the palm of her hand till her wrinkles begin to show. After establishing her position as a filmmaker, Leni watches her fame turn to notoriety following the defeat of Nazi Germany.

Nine and a half times out of ten films, the side characters played by Anna May must die so the white male lead can be returned to his white paramour on the screen. In the murky world these women navigate, their choices will be held up to the test of time. And the real question is, how much has anything changed?

This fierce and exquisite debut about womanhood, ambition, and art, played out against the shifting political tides of the twentieth century, introduces a mesmerizing new literary talent for our times.


 

Grave for TwoA Grave for Two
Anne Holt

Selma Falck’s personal life and career as a lawyer have hit rock bottom. That is until Hege Chin Morell – Norway’s best female skier – approaches her desperate to overturn a doping charge. With two months to the Winter Olympics, Selma faces the seemingly almost impossible task of clearing Morell’s name.

However, when a male skier is found dead after a training accident, it becomes clear to Selma that there is something more serious at risk. Encountering corruption, hidden enmity and shady connections, the pattern of recent crimes and ancient sins becomes undeniable. As Selma’s race against time begins, she realizes that more lives are at stake …


 

New GirlThe New Girl
Daniel Silva

At an exclusive private school in Switzerland, mystery surrounds the identity of the beautiful girl who arrives each morning and leaves each afternoon in a heavily protected motorcade fit for a head of state. She is said to be the daughter of a wealthy international businessman. She is not.

And when she is brutally kidnapped across the border in the Haute-Savoie region of France, Gabriel Allon, the legendary chief of Israeli intelligence, is thrust into a deadly secret war with an old enemy that will determine the future of the Middle East-and perhaps the world …


 

Beggar's KingdomA Beggar’s Kingdom
Paullina Simons

Sometimes a second chance is your only hope.

Is there a fate beyond the fates? Julian has failed Josephine once. Despite grave danger and impossible odds, he is determined to do the unimaginable and try again to save the woman he loves.

What follows is a love story like no other as the doomed lovers embark on an incredible adventure across time and space. Racing through history and against the merciless clock, they face countless dangers and deadly enemies.

Living amid beauty and ecstasy, bloodshed and betrayal, each time they court and cheat death brings Julian and Josephine closer to an unthinkable sacrifice and a confrontation with the harshest master of all…destiny.

The second novel in Paullina Simons’ stunning End of Forever saga continues the heartbreaking story of Julian and Josephine, and a love that spans lifetimes.


 

Taking Tom Murray HomeTaking Tom Murray Home
Tim Slee

Bankrupt dairy farmer Tom Murray decides he’d rather sell off his herd and burn down his own house than hand them over to the bank. But something goes tragically wrong, and Tom dies in the blaze. His wife, Dawn, doesn’t want him to have died for nothing and decides to hold a funeral procession for Tom as a protest, driving 350 kilometres from Yardley in country Victoria to bury him in Melbourne where he was born. To make a bigger impact she agrees with some neighbours to put his coffin on a horse and cart and take it slow – real slow.

But on the night of their departure, someone burns down the local bank. And as the motley funeral procession passes through Victoria, there are more mysterious arson attacks. Dawn has five days to get to Melbourne. Five days, five more towns, and a state ready to explode in flames …

Told with a laconic, deadpan wit, Taking Tom Murray Home is a timely, thought-provoking, heart-warming, quintessentially Australian story like no other. It’s a novel about grief, pain, anger and loss, yes, but it’s also about hope – and how community, friends and love trump pain and anger, every time.

The winner of the inaugural Banjo Prize, Taking Tom Murray Home is a funny, moving, bittersweet Australian story of fires, families and the restorative power of community.


 

NON-FICTION

A Lot with a LittleA Lot with a Little
Tim Costello

In this evocative memoir, Tim Costello explores the people and experiences that have shaped him into a socially active fighter for the world’s most challenging issues. Tracing each defining stage of his life with stark insight and honesty, Tim untangles his ongoing struggle to align his self-perceptions with his choices and what his life represents.

More than a simple life story, this is a book about individual and community, public and private, spiritual and material, equality and liberty – and, most of all, about faith and its power to sustain in the face of the world’s big issues. Challenging and thought-provoking no matter what your beliefs, this is a book to savour and re-read.

***Tim will be joining us for an event in Mornington on 15 October – click here for full details and to book a ticket***


 

Parenthood Completely UnsupervisedParenthood: Completely Unsupervised
Dave O’Neil

Ah, parenting. After 300,000 years of keeping kids alive, you’d reckon we’d have it nailed. But, as the decades roll on, it seems we’re as clueless as ever. In the great tradition of mums and dads throughout history, we’re still making it up as we go along.

Hopscotch may have given way to Xbox and fish fingers to quinoa-kale organic nuggets, but, when it comes to parenting, some things never change.

A laugh-out-loud look at parenthood through the ages by comedian and father of three Dave O’Neil.


 

Dale Vine's Outdoor Reno GuideDale Vine’s Outdoor Reno Guide
Dale Vine

Nobody wants to spend time in a tired, uninspiring backyard. But how can you create an outdoor space that’s beautiful and works for your needs? Landscaper and much loved The Block contestant, Dale Vine will help you create your dream garden with his Outdoor Reno Guide. From the initial vision to planning, budgeting and final execution, Dale demystifies the process of turning your humble garden into a space that you and your family want to spend time in, whether you’re starting with bare ground or you are renovating an existing space.

With clear examples, notes on common pitfalls and simple, step-by-step DIY projects, Dale provides the specific tips, tricks and advice essential for any landscaping project, from site analysis to lifestyle considerations to plant selection. His most important message: you need a plan. No matter its size or shape, you can transform your outdoor space from a neglected, untamed patch of dirt and weeds into something magical on any budget – and even small changes can turn a simple backyard into a photogenic sanctuary.

Dale Vine’s Outdoor Reno Guide is an inspirational and instructive resource thanks to Dale’s years of experience and expert knowledge. With great photos throughout, see the potential of your garden through the lens of an expert landscaper.


 

Halliday Wine Companion 2020The Halliday Wine Companion 2020
James Halliday

For over thirty years James Halliday has been Australia’s most respected wine critic, and his Halliday Wine Companion is the go-to guide for wine ratings, regions, best varietals, winery reviews and a curated selection of the best wines in Australia.

The 2020 edition has been completely revised to bring readers up-to-the-minute information, as well as re-designed in a modern new style to reflect the brand’s ever expanding audience. In his inimitable style, Halliday shares his extensive knowledge of wine through detailed tasting notes with points, price, value symbol and advice on best-by drinking, as well as each wine’s closure and alcohol content. He provides information about wineries and winemakers, including vineyard sizes, opening times and contact details. The perfect self-purchase or gift for the wine lover in your life.


 

Explore AustraliaExplore Australia 2020

Explore Australia 2020 covers more of the country than any other Australian guidebook. Now in its 37th edition, this seminal guidebook includes details on over 700 regional towns across the country, including information on local and nearby attractions, as well as markets and festivals. There’s also key information for every capital city and major touring region, plus suggested daytrip itineraries. Discover the best this country has to offer with features on the best beaches, gourmet food and wine destinations, wildlife encounters, adventure holidays, Indigenous cultural experiences and kid-friendly destinations.

Whatever adventure you’re looking for, Explore Australia 2020 is the ultimate travel guide to help you plan the perfect trip.


 

Art of Growing UpThe Art of Growing Up
John Marsden

When I hear parents say ‘I want my children to enjoy their childhood; there’ll be time when they’re older to learn about those things’, I hear the voices of those who are scared of the vastness of the universe. These adults have a view of childhood as some kind of discrete interval, rather than just a few years from the continuum of life. How fortunate that the spirit, courage and curiosity of many young people remain largely undefeated by such adults. 

John Marsden has spent his adult life engaging with young minds – through both his award-winning, internationally bestselling young adult fiction and his work as one of Australia’s most esteemed and experienced educators. As the founder and principal of two schools, John is at the coalface of education and daily witness to the inevitable and yet still mysterious process of growing up.

Now, in this astonishing, insightful and hugely ambitious manifesto, John pulls together all he has learned from over thirty years’ experience working with and writing for young people. He shares his insights into everything – from the role of schools and the importance of education, to problem parents and problem children, and the conundrum of what it means to grow up and be ‘happy’ in the 21st century.


 

Arab Australian OtherArab, Australian, Other: Stories on Race and Identity
Randa Abdel-Fattah and Sara Saleh

Although there are 22 separate Arab nationalities representing an enormous variety of cultural backgrounds and experiences, the portrayal of Arabs in Australia tends to range from homogenising (at best) to racist pop-culture caricatures.

Edited by award-winning author and academic Randa Abdel-Fattah, and activist and poet Sara Saleh, and featuring contributors Michael Mohammed Ahmad, Ruby Hamad and Paula Abood, among many others, this collection explores the experience of living as a member of the Arab diaspora in Australia and includes stories of family, ethnicity, history, grief, isolation, belonging and identity.


 

Portraits DestroyedPortraits Destroyed: Power, Ego and History’s Vandals
Julie Cotter

Churchill entered Westminster Hall at noon, to the sound of drums beating out a victory roll – his signature gesture. At 80, he was still prime minister, and angered by discussion of retirement. But that irritation would pale in comparison to the anger he was about to feel on this day, 10 November 1954, when his birthday portrait was unveiled.

Portraits have power. For centuries the tool of queens, emperors, statesmen and dictators, they offer the ultimate in image control. And, identified as portraits are with their subjects, their destruction remains a shocking act – whether committed for reasons of vanity, legacy, ethics, race, or even as part of the creative process. Join respected art historian Dr Julie Cotter as she journeys through eras, continents and regimes to examine the extraordinary stories of Portraits Destroyed.


 

The Father HoodThe Father Hood
Luke Benedictus, Andrew McUtchen, Jeremy Macvean

Welcome to The Father Hood. Where we celebrate the growing tribe of hands-on dads who are discovering that becoming a father is the greatest opportunity a man can get to be better than he’s ever been before; stronger, wiser and more compassionate. But there is no instruction manual or benchmark for modern dads aside from one golden rule: keep showing up.

With a mix of celebrity interviews – from Hugh Jackman, David Beckham, Osher Gunsberg and many more – as well as quotes and stats that capture the rise of the hands-on dad, The Father Hood is the guide to helping modern dads thrive and survive in the only job that really counts.


 

Australia ModernAustralia Modern: Architecture, Landscape & Design 1925-1975
Hannah Lewi & Philip Goad

From the Sydney Opera House and the National Gallery of Victoria to sought-after homes across the country, the pervasive presence of modernism is inescapable in Australia. Led by the likes of Robin Boyd, Harry Seidler and Walter Burley Griffin, modernist architects and designers set out to rebuild at all scales, from vast infrastructure projects, to public health and education institutions, to new centres of culture, consumption and leisure.

Australia Modern vividly captures this architectural legacy with a survey of 100 significant modern sites, richly illustrated with archival images and newly commissioned photographs. Contextual essays by leading voices in architecture and conservation explore modernism’s influence on every facet of life in Australia and the ongoing challenges facing preservation. Showcasing projects from the iconic and the urban to the everyday, the regional and the lesser known, Australia Modern cultivates an appreciation for the modern architects and buildings that will increasingly constitute the heritage of tomorrow.


 

Dream About Lightning BugsA Dream About Lightning Bugs
Ben Folds

Ben Folds is an internationally celebrated musician, singer-songwriter and former frontman of the alternative rock band, Ben Folds Five, beloved for songs such as ‘Brick’, ‘You Don’t Know Me’, ‘Rockin’ the Suburbs’ and ‘The Luckiest’.

In A Dream About Lightning Bugs, Folds looks back at his life so far in a charming, funny and wise chronicle of his artistic coming of age, infused with the wry observations of a natural storyteller. He opens up about finding his voice as a musician, becoming a rock anti-hero, and hauling a baby grand piano on and off stage for every performance.

From growing up in working class North Carolina amid the race and class tensions that shaped his early songwriting, to painful life lessons he learned the hard way, he also ruminates on music in the digital age, the absurdity of life on the road, and the challenges of sustaining a multi-decade, multi-faceted career in the music business.

A Dream About Lightning Bugs embodies what Folds has been singing about for years: Smile like you’ve got nothing to prove because it hurts to grow up, and life flies by in seconds.


 

Strong ManThe Strong Man
Grant Edwards

Grant Edwards was once an elite athlete, Olympics qualifier and Australia’s strongest man. His Guinness Book of Records feats of strength were acclaimed internationally, and as a high ranking police officer he spent decades protecting vulnerable people around the world. But nothing could shield him from catastrophic harm in the line of duty.

Rising above his tough beginnings in 1970s suburbia, Edwards found sanctuary in elite sport. But he found his true calling with the Australian Federal Police, rising swiftly through the ranks to Commander and personally establishing cybercrime units to fight child exploitation and human trafficking. A highly sought after and disciplined security advisor for governments around the world such as East Timor, Afghanistan and the Americas, Edwards was considered the last person to ‘crack’ – but a narrow escape from a deadly attack in Kabul pushed him to breaking point.

This is the story of an extraordinary man and his extraordinary battle back from the brink.


 

Millionaire CastawayThe Millionaire Castaway
David Glasheen

Losing his fortune in the stock market crash of 1987 was the final straw for Dave Glasheen. After a series of catastrophes, he needed to take drastic measures to restore himself. Opting out of the rat race, he cast himself away to a deserted island off the north-east tip of Australia, as far off the grid as was humanly possible. He has lived there ever since.

One annual supermarket shop, a sketchy internet connection, and enough ingredients for a home brew satisfy all of Dave’s material needs. He catches fish, traps rainwater and cooks on an open fire. For company he tames dingoes, meets with friends from the Aboriginal community 40 kilometres away, and entertains drop-ins such as Russell Crowe sailing past on his honeymoon or the chairman of McDonald’s on a game-fishing trip. Then there’s his running feud with Boxhead, an antisocial saltwater crocodile who just won’t leave him in peace.

Between heartbreak and hair-raising adventures, Dave has found happiness on Restoration Island and dreams of creating a retreat to promote the profound healing that saved his life. Brimming with humour, eccentricity and hard-earned wisdom, The Millionaire Castaway is the feel-good autobiography of the year.


 

Dear DadDear Dad
Samuel Johnson

If you could tell your dad anything, what would it be? 

Steve Waugh, Kathy Lette, Trent Dalton, John Paul Young, Danny Green, Kurt Fearnley, Samuel Johnson, John Williamson, Susie Youssef, Michala Banas, Glenn Shorrock, Normie Rowe, Matilda Brown, Shane Jacobson, Brooke Davis, Christie Whelan Browne, Shannon Noll, Russell Morris, Shaun Tan, Michelle Law, Ben Gillies, Hilde Hinton, Mark Brandi, Brian Mannix, Russell Morris, Catherine Deveny, Sophie Green, Toni Tapp Coutts …

A heartfelt, honest and very human book of letters that will make you smile, and make you cry. It is the perfect gift for the dad or dad figure in your life. And a poignant reminder to say how you feel before it is too late.


 

Prettiest Horse in the Glue FactoryThe Prettiest Horse in the Glue Factory
Corey White

Corey White was a golden child. He knew this because his father would hit his mother and his sisters but not him. And his mother adored him so much she let him drop out of primary school.

After losing his father to jail and his mother to heroin, though, he became a target for cruelty and dysfunction in foster homes. A scholarship to a prestigious boarding school lifted him out of foster care and awakened a love of learning and reading for him, but this was soon overwhelmed by a crushing depression and drug addiction.

Through it all, he kept thinking – sometimes hoping, sometimes fearing – that he was destined for something bigger. Would he find salvation in the halls of a university, or a poetically grimy crack den, or through love? Or would the golden glow that had been in him since childhood ultimately fade, leaving only darkness and ruin?

The Prettiest Horse in the Glue Factory is a memoir of trauma and survival that will break your heart and then show you how to rebuild it. It is a powerful, lyrical and darkly funny debut from one of Australia’s brightest young comedians.


 

SaltSalt
Bruce Pascoe

Bruce Pascoe has been described as a ‘living national treasure’ and his work as ‘revelatory’. This volume of his best and most celebrated stories and essays, collected here for the first time, ranges across his long career, and explores his enduring fascination with Australia’s landscape, culture, land management and history.

Featuring new and previously unpublished fiction alongside his most revered and thought-provoking nonfiction – including extracts from his modern classic Dark Emu – this collection is perfect for Pascoe fans and new readers alike. It’s time all Australians saw the range and depth of this most marvellous of local writers.


 

Growing up QueerGrowing Up Queer in Australia
Benjamin Law

I marked the day in my adolescent diary with a single blank page.
The mantle of “queer migrant” compelled me to keep going – to go further.
I never “came out” to my parents. I felt I owed them no explanation.
All I heard from the pulpit were grim hints.
I became acutely aware of the parts of myself that were unpalatable to queers who grew up in the city.
I was thirty-eight and figured it was time to come out to her.
That’s when I know it’s not going anywhere – the gay.
I felt like I had been dunked into an episode of The L Word and I wasn’t given the script.
No amount of YouTube videos and queer think pieces prepared me for this moment.
My queerness was born in a hot dry land that was never ceded.
I finally admitted what my feelings for Dirty Dancing–era Patrick Swayze had clearly been indicating for some time.
Even now, I sometimes think that I don’t know my own desire.

Compiled by celebrated author and journalist Benjamin Law, Growing Up Queer in Australia assembles voices from across the spectrum of LGBTIQA+ identity. Spanning diverse places, eras, genders, ethnicities and experiences, these are the stories of growing up queer in Australia.

For better or worse, sooner or later, life conspires to reveal you to yourself, and this is growing up.

With contributions from David Marr, Fiona Wright, Nayuka Gorrie, Steve Dow, Holly Throsby, Sally Rugg, Tony Ayres, Nic Holas, Rebecca Shaw, Kerryn Phelps and many more.


 

Veg Jamie OliverVeg
Jamie Oliver

A real explosion of colour, taste and variety, he wants to get the nation switched on to just how tasty and comforting veggie meals can be, leaving people feeling full, satisfied and happy – and not missing meat from their plate. Whether it’s embracing a meat-free day or two each week, living a vegetarian lifestyle, or just wanting to try some brilliant new flavour combinations, this book ticks all the boxes.

Sharing simple tips and tricks that will excite the taste buds, and help keep people’s brains and mouths engaged, this book will also give people the confidence to up their veg intake and widen their recipe repertoire, safe in the knowledge that it’ll taste utterly delicious. From simple suppers and family favourites to weekend dishes for sharing with friends, this book is packed full of phenomenal food – pure and simple.

A book for everyone, this is the perfect moment for Jamie to inspire every kind of cook with his super-tasty, brilliantly simple, but inventive veg dishes.


 

Jack CharlesJack Charles: A Born-again Blakfella
Jack Charles

Stolen from his mother and placed into institutional care when he was only a few months old, Uncle Jack was raised under the government’s White Australia Policy. The loneliness and isolation he experienced during those years had a devastating impact on him that endured long after he reconnected with his Aboriginal roots and discovered his stolen identity. Even today he feels like an outsider; a loner; a fringe dweller.

In this honest and no-holds-barred memoir, Uncle Jack reveals the ‘ups and downs of this crazy, drugged up, locked up, fucked up, and at times unbelievable, life’. From his sideline as a cat burglar, battles with drug addiction and stints in prison, to gracing the nation’s stages and screens as he dazzled audiences with his big personality and acting prowess, he takes us through the most formative moments of his life.

By turns heartbreaking and hilarious, Jack Charles: A Born-again Blakfella is a candid and uplifting memoir from one of Australia’s finest and most beloved actors.


 

Women Men Whole Damn ThingWomen, Men and the Whole Damn Thing
David Leser

How to find the right words to frame this horror? How to understand why men do what they do to women? How to comprehend this malign force that seems to seep from the male psyche and infect us all? . . . That is the central hope, the appeal, embedded in this book: that other men might join me in this investigation and ruthless self-interrogation-and in doing so, become part of the change that is so urgently required.

In February 2018, the Good Weekend cover story by David Leser, ‘Women, Men and the Whole Damn Thing’, had an extraordinary response. David received hundreds of personal messages from readers around the world – both men and women – urging him to expand his story. Here is that book: a brilliant, impassioned, unflinching account of the firestorm of #MeToo, how we got there and where we must go now.

In this essential and incisive investigation, Leser unearths the roots of misogyny, its inextricable links to the patriarchy and how history brought us to the #Metoo movement and the wave of incandescent female rage that is sweeping the world. Crucially, he also interrogates his own psyche, privilege and culpability as he bears witness to the ‘collective wound of the world’ and asks how we can move towards healing and profound and permanent change.


 

SongspiralsSongspirals: Sharing Women’s Wisdom of Country Through Songlines
Gay’wu Group of Women

‘We want you to come with us on our journey, our journey of songspirals. Songspirals are the essence of people in this land, the essence of every clan. We belong to the land and it belongs to us. We sing to the land, sing about the land. We are that land. It sings to us.’ 

Aboriginal Australian cultures are the oldest living cultures on earth and at the heart of Aboriginal cultures is song. These ancient narratives of landscape have often been described as a means of navigating across vast distances without a map, but they are much, much more than this. Songspirals are sung by Aboriginal people to awaken Country, to make and remake the life-giving connections between people and place. Songspirals are radically different ways of understanding the relationship people can have with the landscape.

For Yolngu people from North East Arnhem Land, women and men play different roles in bringing songlines to life, yet the vast majority of what has been published is about men’s place in songlines. Songspirals is a rare opportunity for outsiders to experience Aboriginal women’s role in crying the songlines in a very authentic and direct form.


 

Chip Shop in PoznanA Chip Shop in Poznan: My Unlikely Year in Poland
Ben Aitken

Not many Brits move to Poland to work in a fish and chip shop. Fewer still come back wanting to be a Member of the European Parliament.

Travel writer Ben Aitken moved to Poland in 2016 to understand why the Poles were leaving. He booked the cheapest flight he could find, to a place he had never heard of – Poznan. This candid, funny and off-beat book is the account of his year in Poland, as an unlikely immigrant.

Between peeling potatoes and boning fish, Ben spent time on the road travelling the country. He missed the bus to Auschwitz; stayed with a dozen nuns near Krakow; was offered a job by a Eurosceptic farmer and went to Gdansk to learn how Solidarity rose and communism fell.

This is a bittersweet portrait of an unsung country, challenging stereotypes that Poland is a grey, ex-soviet land, and revealing a diverse country, rightfully proud of its colourful identity.


 

Woman Like HerA Woman Like Her: The Short Life of Qandeel Baloch
Sanam Maher

A beautiful woman in winged eyeliner and a low-cut top lies on a bed urging her favourite cricketer to win the next match. In another post, she pouts at the camera from a hot tub. She posts a selfie with a cleric, wearing his cap at a jaunty angle. Her posts are viewed millions of times and the comments beneath them are full of hate. As her notoriety grows, the comments made about her on national talk shows are just as vitriolic. They call her Pakistan’s Kim Kardashian, they say she’ll do anything for attention. When she’s murdered, they’re transfixed by the footage of her body.

Drawing on interviews and in-depth research, Sanam Maher pieces together Qandeel’s life from the village where she grew up in the backwaters of rural Pakistan, to her stint in a women’s shelter after escaping her marriage, to her incarnation as a social media sensation and the Muslim world’s most unlikely feminist icon.


 

Banking BadBanking Bad
Adele Ferguson

In 2018, against all the odds, Australia held a royal commission into the banking and financial services industries. Its revelations rocked the nation. Even defenders of the banks were blindsided.

Few people were more instrumental in bringing about the commission than journalist Adele Ferguson. Through her exposes in print and on television, she pursued the truth about funds mismanagement, fraud, lack of probity, and the hard-sell culture that took over the finance industry after deregulation in the 1980s. But it wasn’t just light-touch regulators and crooked bankers growing fat on bonuses she put under the spotlight. It was also their victims – men and women who had lost everything, and had no recourse when they discovered empty accounts, egregious fees, forged documents and broken promises.

Now in Banking Bad, Ferguson tells the full story of the power imbalance, toxic culture and cover-ups. She describes the long fight for justice by whistleblowers, victims and political mavericks, and she looks at the outcomes of the royal commission – the falls from grace, the damaging hubris, the scathing assessment of the regulators, and the colossal compensation bill – an estimated $10 billion.

Finally, she asks whereto from here? In May 2019, the Coalition government, which resisted calls for a royal commission, was re-elected. Bank stocks surged and lending regulations were loosened. Will it all be business as usual from now on, or have our financial executives learned that their wealth cannot come at the expense of ordinary Australians?

JULY NEW RELEASES

FICTION

One Good DeedOne Good Deed
David Baldacci

In 1949, Aloysius Archer arrives in the dusty Southern town of Poca City. He has nothing but a handful of dollars, the clothes he’s wearing and an appointment with his new parole officer. After his wartime experiences in Italy and a prison sentence for a crime he didn’t commit, Archer is looking for a fresh start and a peaceful life.

On his first night of freedom, Archer meets local business tycoon Hank Pittleman, who promises Archer handsome compensation to work as his debt collector. Yet Archer takes on more than he bargains for, as he becomes embroiled in a long-running feud between the drought-struck town’s most dangerous residents. When one of them dies, the authorities label Archer as their number one suspect.

A bloody game is being played above and below the law. Everybody playing has a deeply buried secret, and Archer must uncover them all – if he’s to avoid going back behind bars.


 

Most Fun We Ever HadThe Most Fun We Ever Had
Claire Lombardo

At a family wedding, the four Sorenson sisters polka-dot the green lawn in their summer pastels, with varying shades of hair and varying degrees of unease. Their long-infatuated parents watch on with a combination of love and concern.

Sixteen years later, the already messy lives of the sisters are thrown into turmoil by the unexpected reappearance of a teenage boy given up for adoption years earlier – and the rich and varied tapestry of the Sorensons’ past is revealed.

Weaving between past and present, The Most Fun We Ever Had portrays the delights and difficulties of family life and the endlessly complex mixture of affection and abhorrence we feel for those closest to us. A dazzlingly accomplished debut and an utterly immersive portrait of one family’s becoming, it marks the arrival of a major new literary voice.


 

Nearly Normal FamilyA Nearly Normal Family
M.T. Edvardsson

Every murder case starts with a suspect.
What if the suspect is your daughter?
Would you believe her, or the evidence against her?

The Father
Believes his daughter has been framed.

The Mother
Believes she is hiding something.

The Daughter
Believes they have no idea what she’s truly capable of . . .

There are three sides to the story.
And the truth will shatter this family to pieces.

A Nearly Normal Family is the stunning psychological thriller from M. T. Edvardsson and asks what would you do if your child was suspected of murder, how far would you go to protect them? Do you want to know the truth? If you loved A. J. Finn’s The Woman in the Window or J. P. Delaney’s The Girl Before, you will love this.


 

Nickel BoysThe Nickel Boys
Colson Whitehead

Elwood Curtis has taken the words of Dr Martin Luther King to heart: he is as good as anyone. Abandoned by his parents, brought up by his loving, strict and clear-sighted grandmother, Elwood is about to enroll in the local black college. But given the time and the place, one innocent mistake is enough to destroy his future, and so Elwood arrives at The Nickel Academy, which claims to provide ‘physical, intellectual and moral training’ which will equip its inmates to become ‘honorable and honest men’.

In reality, the Nickel Academy is a chamber of horrors, where physical, emotional and sexual abuse is rife, where corrupt officials and tradesmen do a brisk trade in supplies intended for the school, and where any boy who resists is likely to disappear ‘out back’. Stunned to find himself in this vicious environment, Elwood tries to hold on to Dr King’s ringing assertion, ‘Throw us in jail, and we will still love you.’ But Elwood’s fellow inmate and new friend Turner thinks Elwood is naive and worse; the world is crooked, and the only way to survive is to emulate the cruelty and cynicism of their oppressors.

The tension between Elwood’s idealism and Turner’s skepticism leads to a decision which will have decades-long repercussions. Based on the history of a real reform school in Florida that operated for one hundred and eleven years and warped and destroyed the lives of thousands of children, The Nickel Boys is a devastating, driven narrative by a great American novelist whose work is essential to understanding the current reality of the United States.


 

The ChainThe Chain
Adrian McKinty

Listen carefully …
Your child has been kidnapped.
You must abduct someone else’s child to save your own.
Disobey. Break the rules. Go to the cops. Your child will die.
Your victim’s parents must kidnap another child before yours is released.
You are now part of the chain.

#Dontbreakthechain

A book for readers who loved The Girl on the Train and Gone Girl.


 

Ten Loves of Mr NishinoThe Ten Loves of Mr Nishino
Hiromi Kawakami

Who loves Mr Nishino?

Minami is the daughter of Mr Nishino’s true love.
Bereaved Shiori is tempted by his unscrupulous advances.
His colleague Manami should know better.
His conquest Reiko treasures her independence above all else.
Friends Tama and Subaru find themselves playing Nishino’s game, but Eriko loves her cat more.
Sayuri is older, Aichan is much younger, and Misono has her own conquests to make.

For each of them, an encounter with elusive womaniser Mr Nishino will bring torments, desires and delights.


 

Whisper NetworkWhisper Network
Chandler Baker

Sloane, Ardie, Grace, and Rosalita have worked at Truviv, Inc. for years. The sudden death of Truviv’s CEO means their boss, Ames, will likely take over the entire company. Each of the women has a different relationship with Ames, who has always been surrounded by whispers about how he treats women. Those whispers have been ignored, swept under the rug, hidden away by those in charge.

But the world has changed, and the women are watching this promotion differently. This time, when they find out Ames is making an inappropriate move on a colleague, they aren’t willing to let it go. This time, they’ve decided enough is enough.

Sloane and her colleagues’ decision to take a stand sets in motion a catastrophic shift in the office. Lies will be uncovered. Secrets will be exposed. And not everyone will survive.

Explosive, timely, resonant and relatable: if you love Liane Moriarty’s Big Little Lies or Celeste Ng’s Little Fires Everywhere, you will love Whisper Network.


 

Other Half of Augusta HopeThe Other Half of Augusta Hope
Joanna Glen

Augusta Hope has never felt like she fits in.

At six, she’s memorising the dictionary. At seven, she’s correcting her teachers. At eight, she spins the globe and picks her favourite country on the sound of its name: Burundi.

And now that she’s an adult, Augusta has no interest in the goings-on of the small town where she lives with her parents and her beloved twin sister, Julia.

When an unspeakable tragedy upends everything in Augusta’s life, she’s propelled headfirst into the unknown. She’s determined to find where she belongs – but what if her true home, and heart, are half a world away?


 

Six MinutesSix Minutes
Petronella McGovern

How can a child disappear from under the care of four playgroup mums?

One Thursday morning, Lexie Parker dashes to the shop for biscuits, leaving Bella in the safe care of the other mums in the playgroup.

Six minutes later, Bella is gone.

Police and media descend on the tiny village of Merrigang on the edge of Canberra. Locals unite to search the dense bushland. But as the investigation continues, relationships start to fracture, online hate messages target Lexie, and the community is engulfed by fear.

Is Bella’s disappearance connected to the angry protests at Parliament House? What secrets are the parents hiding? And why does a local teacher keep a photo of Bella in his lounge room?

What happened in those six minutes and where is Bella?  The clock is ticking…

This gripping novel will keep you guessing to the very last twist.


 

The YieldThe Yield
Tara June Winch

The yield in English is the reaping, the things that man can take from the land. In the language of the Wiradjuri yield is the things you give to, the movement, the space between things- baayanha.

Knowing that he will soon die, Albert ‘Poppy’ Gondiwindi takes pen to paper. His life has been spent on the banks of the Murrumby River at Prosperous House, on Massacre Plains. Albert is determined to pass on the language of his people and everything that was ever remembered. He finds the words on the wind.

August Gondiwindi has been living on the other side of the world for ten years when she learns of her grandfather’s death. She returns home for his burial, wracked with grief and burdened with all she tried to leave behind. Her homecoming is bittersweet as she confronts the love of her kin and news that Prosperous is to be repossessed by a mining company. Determined to make amends she endeavours to save their land – a quest that leads her to the voice of her grandfather and into the past, the stories of her people, the secrets of the river.

Profoundly moving and exquisitely written, Tara June Winch’s The Yield is the story of a people and a culture dispossessed. But it is as much a celebration of what was and what endures, and a powerful reclaiming of Indigenous language, storytelling and identity.


 

Last Widow (Will Trent 9)The Last Widow (Will Trent #9)
Karin Slaughter

A mysterious kidnapping

On a hot summer night, a scientist from the Centers for Disease Control is grabbed by unknown assailants in a shopping center parking lot. Vanished into thin air, the authorities are desperate to save the doctor.

A devastating explosion

One month later, the serenity of a sunny Sunday afternoon is shattered by the boom of a ground-shaking blast-followed by another seconds later. One of Atlanta’s busiest and most important neighborhoods has been bombed-the location of Emory University, two major hospitals, the FBI headquarters, and the CDC.

A diabolical enemy

Medical examiner Sara Linton and her partner Will Trent, an investigator with the Georgia Bureau of Investigation, rush to the scene-and into the heart of a deadly conspiracy that threatens to destroy thousands of innocent lives.


 

Constant HumA Constant Hum
Alice Bishop

Before the bushfires—before the front of flames comes roaring over the hills—the ridges are thick with gums.

After the fires, the birds have gone. There is only grey ash and melted metal, the blackened husks of cars.
And the lost people: in temporary accommodation on the outskirts of the city, on the TV news in borrowed clothes, or remembered in flyers on a cafe wall.

A Constant Hum grapples with the aftermath of disaster with an eye for telling detail. Some of these stories cut to the bone; others are empathetic stories of survival, even hope.  All are gripping and beautifully written, heralding the arrival of an important new voice in literary fiction.


 

ShepherdShepherd
Catherine Jinks

My father trained me to silence the way he trained his dogs, with food and a cane. Speech, he said, was poison. It scared the game, alerted the gamekeepers and betrayed your friends and family.

Tom Clay was a poacher back in Suffolk. He was twelve when he was caught, tried and transported to New South Wales.

Now, assigned to a shepherds’ hut out west, he is a boy among violent men. He keeps his counsel and watches over his sheep; he steers clear of blowhards like the new man, Rowdy Cavanagh. He is alert to danger, knowing he is a foreigner here: that the land resists his understanding.

The question is: how fast can he learn?

Because a vicious killer named Dan Carver is coming for Tom and Rowdy. And if Tom can’t outwit Carver in the bush – and convince Rowdy to keep his stupid mouth shut – their deaths will be swift and cruel.

This riveting, fast-paced new novel from the multi-award-winning Catherine Jinks brings the brutality and courage of Australia’s colonial frontier vividly to life – and sees one of our master storytellers at the peak of her powers.


 

MinotaurMinotaur
Peter Goldsworthy

Peter Goldsworthy’s new novel features a blind detective determined to deliver justice to the man who shot him, even though his failed assassin has broken out of jail and is equally determined to finish the job. Cleverly structured around the five senses, and with the action confined to one week, it’s pacey and taut, with the cat-and-mouse tension leavened by lighter interludes.

Goldsworthy is interested in all that his protagonist cannot see, as he is forced to meet evil, acting on a trust in his senses, and the ineluctable mystery that is memory.


 

Live a LittleLive a Little
Howard Jacobson

At the age of ninety-something, Beryl Dusinbery is forgetting everything – including her own children. She spends her days stitching morbid samplers and tormenting her two long-suffering carers, Nastya and Euphoria, with tangled stories of her husbands and love affairs.

Shimi Carmelli can do up his own buttons, walks without the aid of a frame and speaks without spitting. Among the widows of North London, he’s whispered about as the last of the eligible bachelors. Unlike Beryl, he forgets nothing – especially not the shame of a childhood incident that has hung over him like an oppressive cloud ever since.

There’s very little life remaining for either of them, but perhaps just enough to heal some of the hurt inflicted along the way, and find new meaning in what’s left. Told with Jacobson’s trademark wit and style, Live a Little is in equal parts funny, irreverent and tender – a novel to make you consider all the paths not taken, and whether you could still change course.


 

Knife (Harry Hold 12)Knife (Harry Hole #12)
Jo Nesbo

Following the dramatic conclusion of number one bestseller The ThirstKnife sees Harry Hole waking up with a ferocious hangover, his hands and clothes covered in blood.  Not only is Harry about to come face to face with an old, deadly foe, but with his darkest personal challenge yet.

The phenomenal twelfth instalment in Jo Nesbo’s internationally bestselling crime fiction series.


 

NON-FICTION

Sunday Story ClubThe Sunday Story Club
Doris Brett & Kerry Cue

These are the stories that women tell each other when they gather for a deep and structured conversation – once a month in a suburban living room – about the things that really matter. They discover that life can be a heartbeat away from chaos; that bad things happen to good people; that good people do outrageous things; that the desire for transformation is enduringly human.

A mother tells of the heartbreaking loss of control when her daughter develops anorexia.  A sister reveals the high psychological cost of being hated by a sibling over the course of her life.  Husbands leave wives; wives take lovers; friendships shatter; finances collapse; children defy parents; wrong choices turn out to be right ones; agency is lost and re-claimed.

Profound, layered and clear-sighted, this collection of real-life stories reveals the emotional untidiness that lies below the shiny surface of modern life and reminds us of the power of real conversation to enlighten, heal and transform.


 

Waste Not EverydayWaste Not Everyday
Erin Rhoads

Suited to those who are interested in taking their first steps towards a zero waste lifestyle, this book is a lighter, easier approach to Erin’s first and more in depth book, Waste Not. Also makes a great gift for friends and family looking for a simple introduction to the concept of zero waste.

Would you like to throw away less? Do something for the planet? But not ready to dive straight into composting or go totally plastic-free yet? Waste Not Everyday is your step-by-step guide with 365 easy changes that will not only influence what you throw out but also have a genuine impact on the future of our planet.

Split into four easy-to-follow parts, Waste Not Everyday features simple tips that will lead to a real shift in thinking and action and show you that a zero-waste lifestyle is actually achievable – for everyone, every budget and every schedule. With tips ranging from actions and inspiration to recipes and resources, Erin Rhoads, well-known zero-waste advocate and author of Waste Not, takes you on a gentle journey towards a life with less waste and more meaning.

***Mark your calendar! Erin will be joining us in store on Thursday 7 November for a ‘waste-free Christmas’ workshop***


 

Only in TokyoOnly in Toyko
Michael Ryan & Luke Burgess

Join intrepid chefs Michael Ryan and Luke Burgess on the best sort of culinary adventure – one that could happen only in Tokyo. From daybreak to late night, discover the creative people and compelling stories behind the restaurants, bars and tea houses of the world’s most exciting food destination. This is a book as much for people travelling to the city as it is for those with an appreciation of its special magic.


 

CastawayCastaway
Robert Macklin

In 1858, 14-year-old Narcisse Pelletier sailed from Marseilles in the French trader Saint-Paul. With a cargo of Bordeaux wine, they stopped in Bombay, then Hong Kong, and from there they set sail with more than 300 Chinese prospectors bound for the goldfields of Ballarat and Bendigo. Around the eastern tip of New Guinea, however, the ship became engulfed in fog, struck reefs and ran aground.

Scrambling aboard a longboat, the survivors undertook a perilous voyage, crossing almost 1000 kilometres of the Coral Sea before reaching the shores of the Daintree region in far north Queensland, where, abandoned by his shipmates and left for dead, Narcisse was rescued by the local Aboriginal people. For seventeen years he lived with them, growing to manhood and participating fully in their world – until in 1875 he was discovered by the crew of a pearling lugger and wrenched from his Aboriginal family. Taken back to his ‘real’ life in France, he became a lighthouse keeper, married and had another family, all the while dreaming of what he had left behind…

Drawing from firsthand interviews with Narcisse after his return to France and other contemporary accounts of exploration and survival, and documenting the spread of European settlement in Queensland and the brutal frontier wars that followed, Robert Macklin weaves an unforgettable tale of a young man caught between two cultures in a time of transformation and upheaval.


 

On Eating MeatOn Eating Meat
Matthew Evans

How can 160,000 deaths in one day constitute a ‘medium-sized operation’?
Think beef is killing the world? What about asparagus farms? Or golf?
Eat dairy? You’d better eat veal, too.

Going vegan might be all the rage, but the fact is the world has an ever-growing, insatiable appetite for meat – especially cheap meat. Former food critic and chef, now farmer and restaurateur Matthew Evans grapples with the thorny issues around the ways we produce and consume animals.

From feedlots and abattoirs, to organic farms and animal welfare agencies, he has an intimate, expert understanding of the farming practices that take place in our name. Evans calls for less radicalisation, greater understanding, and for ethical omnivores to stand up for the welfare of animals and farmers alike.

Sure to spark intense debate, On Eating Meat is an urgent read for all vegans, vegetarians and carnivores.


 

Three WomenThree Women
Lisa Taddeo

All Lina wanted was to be desired. How did she end up in a marriage with two children and a husband who wouldn’t touch her?

All Maggie wanted was to be understood. How did she end up in a relationship with her teacher and then in court, a hated pariah in her small town?

All Sloane wanted was to be admired. How did she end up a sexual object of men, including her husband, who liked to watch her have sex with other men and women?

Three Women is a record of unmet needs, unspoken thoughts, disappointments, hopes and unrelenting obsessions.


 

Mirka MoraMirka Mora: A Life Making Art
Sabine Cotte

‘I would paint the sky if I was offered it.’ – Mirka Mora

Mirka Mora: A Life Making Art provides a unique insight into one of Melbourne’s most beloved personalities. Revealing an unseen side of Mirka through both her materials and practice, this intimate portrait shares her complex and truly innovative techniques, which until now have not been studied.

Detailing the artist’s breadth of practice, her idiosyncratic processes and blend of traditional methods and modern creativity, this book shows how Mirka’s various modes of making art connected deep emotions, stories of displacement and loss with major movements of the twentieth century. From Holocaust survivor to Melbourne cultural icon, Mirka expressed the intensity of her personal life through artworks that embodied feminism, the craft movement as well as community art policies of the 1980s.

With privileged access to the artist and her studio, Sabine Cotte offers a new perspective on this extraordinary woman, illuminating Mirka’s significance as one of Australia’s most compelling, creative and prolific artists.


 

My First MemoryMy First Memory: Epiphanies, Watersheds and Origin Stories
Ben Holden

What is your first memory?

Or, rather, what do you imagine to be your earliest memory?

Perhaps, alternatively, there was a moment during childhood when the world’s axis shifted? A transformative realisation, epiphany or experience that changed the course of your life: your very own ‘sense of a beginning’…

In My First Memory, bestselling anthologist Ben Holden explores these touchstones via the watershed experiences of some of the greatest figures of our age. Along the way, he lightly explores how memory and childhood merge to form identity. How, in the process, we not only create individual origin-stories but also, on a broader level, fashion human history.

The first memories of iconic figures – from Machiavelli to Freud, Einstein to Hawking, Churchill to Luther King, Pankhurst to Angelou, Pavarotti to Springsteen, and Pelé to Bolt – combine with exclusive, personal pieces by some of today’s greatest writers, scientists and thinkers: the likes of Sebastian Barry, Melvyn Bragg, David Eagleman, Susan Greenfield, Tessa Hadley, Javier Marías, Michael Morpurgo and the late Ursula K Le Guin.

The trip down memory lane is heightened by the remembrances of refugees: from heroic figures such as Madeleine Albright, Isabel Allende, Alf Dubs, Yusra Mardini, Elie Wiesel and Stefan Zweig to lesser-known but no less courageous voices. Many of these moving accounts tell of children being forced to leave home and family behind forever. They may have grown up to lead inspirational lives – but none ever forgot from whence they came.

After all, each of us must start somewhere and – as this timeless collection unforgettably proves – there is always a first time for everything.


 

No worriesNo Worries: A Guide to Releasing Anxiety and Worry Using CBT
Sarah Edelman

From the bestselling author of Change Your Thinking comes No Worries – the clear, compassionate and practical guide to understanding and managing anxiety and worry.  Sarah Edelman is a clinical psychologist, author and trainer. She has published many articles in professional and mainstream journals, and is the author of the best-selling book on CBT, Change Your Thinking.


 

BowravilleBowraville
Dan Box

A true crime story cannot often be believed, at least at the beginning. In Bowraville, all three of the victims were Aboriginal. All three were killed within five months, between 1990 and 1991. The same white man was linked to each, but nobody was convicted.

More than two decades later, homicide detective Gary Jubelin contacted Dan Box, asking him to pursue this serial killing. At that time, few others in the justice system seemed to know – or care – about the murders in Bowraville. Dan spoke to the families of the victims, Colleen Walker-Craig, Evelyn Greenup and Clinton Speedy-Duroux, as well as the lawyers, police officers and even the suspect involved in what had happened. His investigation, as well as the families’ own determined campaigning, forced the authorities to reconsider the killings.

This account asks painful questions about what ‘justice’ means and how it is delivered, as well as describing Dan’s own shifting, uncomfortable realisation that he was a reporter who crossed the line.


 

History of PhilosophyThe History of Philosophy
A.C. Grayling

The story of philosophy is an epic tale: an exploration of the ideas, views and teachings of some of the most creative minds known to humanity. But since the long-popular classic, Bertrand Russell’s History of Western Philosophy, first published in 1945, there has been no comprehensive and entertaining, single-volume history of this great intellectual journey.

With his characteristic clarity and elegance A. C. Grayling takes the reader from the world-views and moralities before the age of the Buddha, Confucius, and Socrates, through Christianity’s dominance of the European mind, to the Renaissance and Enlightenment, and on to Mill, Nietzsche, Sartre, and philosophy today. And, since the story of philosophy is incomplete without mention of the great philosophical traditions of India, China and the Persian-Arabic world, he gives a comparative survey of them too.

Accessible for students and eye-opening for philosophy readers, he covers epistemology, metaphysics, ethics, aesthetics, logic, the philosophy of mind, the philosophy of language, political philosophy and the history of debates in these areas of enquiry, through the ideas of the celebrated philosophers as well as less well-known influential thinkers. He also asks what we have learnt from this body of thought, and what progress is still to be made.

The first authoritative and accessible one-volume history of philosophy for decades, remarkable for its range and accessibility, this is a landmark work.


 

A Stolen LifeA Stolen Life
Antonio Buti

On Christmas Day 1957, Joe Trevorrow walked through the blistering heat to seek help for his sick baby boy. When relatives agreed to take Bruce to hospital, Joe was relieved – his son was in safe hands – but, within days, Bruce would be living with another family, and Joe would never see his son again.

At the age of ten, Bruce would be returned to his Indigenous family, sparking a lifelong search for an identity that could never truly be known and a court case that made history.


 

Plots and PrayersPlots and Prayers
Niki Savva

On 21 August 2018, 35 Liberal MPs cast their vote against Malcolm Turnbull, effectively signalling the end of his leadership. Three days later, the deed was done, and Scott Morrison was anointed prime minister.

Abbott’s relentless campaign of destabilisation, helped along by his acolytes in the Parliament and by his powerful media mates, the betrayals of colleagues, and the rise of the religious right, climaxing in the challenge by Peter Dutton, all played a part in Turnbull’s downfall.

But so did Turnbull’s own poor political judgement. He was a good prime minister and a terrible politician. The good bits of Malcolm were not enough to make up for the bad Malcolm.

Nevertheless, the sheer brutality of his removal left many Liberals aghast. MPs were traumatised or humiliated by eight days of madness. Men and women cried from sheer anguish. They went through hell, and feared when it was over that they would not make it back – and nor would the Liberal Party.  Turnbull’s road ended in ruins, as it was always bound to and as he always knew it would, as he predicted to Niki Savva less than three years before it happened.

But when his end was imminent, he could not bear to let go. And when it was over, he was defiant, fragile – and, yes – vengeful.

This is the inside story of what happened – and what happened next.


 

Wunch of BankersA Wunch of Bankers: A Year in the Hayne Royal Commission
Daniel Ziffer

For Dan Ziffer and his Australia-wide audience, it was a complicated, galling, and gasp-inducing year at the Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry.  It wasn’t just its exhaustive rounds of hearings around the country – Melbourne, Brisbane, Darwin, and Sydney – on topics from farming finance to financial planning. It wasn’t even the long list of scandals exposed to a horrified nation – charging fees to dead people, blatant conflicts of interest, and taking $1 billion from customers in fees that banks were never entitled to.

Mixed among the testimony are snippets from life on the road as the World’s Oldest Debuting TV Reporter – not just driving five hours one-way to talk to a man who almost blew his brains out over a bank nabbing his $22 million estate, but explaining how journalism can only ever give you a glimpse inside complex issues.

In A Wunch of Bankers, Dan Ziffer bring out the colour and grit of the royal commission’s proceedings, and explores broader issues raised by the testimony. A mixture of analysis, reportage, and observations, it is densely researched and compellingly written.


 

FakeFake
Stephanie Wood

Women the world over are brought up to hope, even expect, to find the man of their dreams, marry and live happily ever after. When Stephanie Wood meets a sweet, sophisticated man who owns land and businesses, she embarks on an exhilarating romance with him. He seems compassionate, truthful and loving. He talks about the future with her. She falls in love. She also becomes increasingly beset by anxiety at the lavish three-act plays he offers her in the form of excuses for frequent cancellations and no-shows. She begins to wonder, who is this man?

When she ends the relationship Stephanie switches back on her journalistic nous and uncovers a story of mind-boggling duplicity and manipulation. She also finds she is not alone; that the world is full of smart, sassy women who have suffered the attentions of liars, cheats, narcissists, fantasists and phonies, men with dangerously adept abilities to deceive.

In this brilliantly acute and broad-ranging book, Wood, an award-winning writer and journalist, has written a riveting, important account of contemporary love, and the resilience of those who have witnessed its darkest sides.


 

Perfect MotionPerfect Motion: How Walking Makes Us Wiser
Jono Lineen

Since our first ancestor rose up to place one foot in front of another, our desire to walk has produced fundamental changes in our bodies and minds.  In Perfect Motion, Jono Lineen investigates that transformation, and why walking has made us more creative, helped us to learn, constructed our perception of time, strengthened our resilience and provided a way of making sense of our life – and death.

After the tragic loss of his younger brother, Lineen experienced walking’s regenerative power firsthand. Grief-stricken and adrift, he set off on a 2700-kilometre solo trek across the Himalayas. He walked for months until his legs ached and feet blistered, and by the end of the expedition something had changed in him. He was stronger – not just physically, but psychologically and emotionally.

What had happened? What had given him this feeling of peace; joy even? Determined to find out, he began researching the science and history of walking and running, and discovered that there were fascinating reasons for his metamorphosis. Now, weaving together his own remarkable personal stories with evolutionary research, psychology, neuroscience, anatomy and philosophy, Lineen reveals for the first time the powerful effect that even the shortest strolls can have on us. And why walking is what we’re made to do; it is our perfect motion.

LOVE YOUR BOOKSHOP DAY 2019!

2019-LYBD-Web-Banner_02_FA

Love Your Bookshop Day is about celebrating bookshops,
bookselling and the culture of books, reading and writing.

So whether you love us for our amazing staff and their awesome advice and friendly service,
our carefully curated range of gorgeous books,
our great events,
or just simply that wonderful sight and smell
when you step through the door,
we’d love to see you on
Saturday 10 August 

to help us celebrate!!


Here’s some of the great stuff we’ve got planned for the day:

  • We know so many of you love our wonderful front window displays, now here’s a chance to ‘win the window’! – thanks to the support of our wonderful publishers, we’ll have a window full of amazing books that you could win, simply by making a purchase of $50 or more in store on Saturday 10 August!  Ask staff for details on how to enter.

  • Children’s Illustrator Extraordinaire, James Hart, will be visiting between 11am and 1pm, drawing pictures on request!  Come on down for your very own personalised piece of art!!

  • We’ll be donating 10% of sales for the day to the Indigenous Literacy Foundation to support the fantastic work they do.  You can find out more about the ILF here.

ILF logo

  • Get creative and sign our graffiti wall – add in your favourite book titles, have a go at illustrating your favourite book character or just tell us what you love most about Farrells!

Graffiti window 2016

  • Sausage Sizzle from 11am-1pm, thanks to the Rotary Club of Mornington – proceeds also to the ILF.

  • Face Painting for the kids!  From 11am-1pm we’ll have free face painting for all our youngest bookshop lovers.

  • Colouring comp picColouring in Competition! For kids up to age 12, collect a copy of the picture in store or print a copy off here.  Entries should be returned by 5pm Wednesday 14 August, with the winners announced and prizes awarded at our Children’s Book Week celebration on Saturday 17 August at 3pm.

  • Micro-story Challenge - jump on our social media pages (Facebook and Instagram) to enter our micro-story competition – can you tell a story in only 10 words – no more, no less!?  Great prizes to be won.

  • Lucky book dip!  Make a purchase and then take your chances with our lucky dip – you could score an advanced reading copy of a forthcoming book or perhaps something that might have taken a knock or two but is still just as wonderful on the inside.

  • Double Loyalty Points! – for one day only, if you’re a member of our Friends of Farrells (FOF) Loyalty Program, you’ll earn double points for any eligible transaction (usual FOF rules apply).  Ask in store if you’d like to hear more about the Friends of Farrells Program – perhaps sign up on the day!

JUNE NEW RELEASES

FICTION

Allegra in Three PartsAllegra in Three Parts
Suzanne Daniel

I can split myself in two… something I have to do because of Joy and Matilde. They are my grandmothers and I love them both and they totally love me but they can’t stand each other.

Eleven-year-old Allegra shuttles between her grandmothers who live next door to one another but couldn’t be more different. Matilde works all hours and instils discipline, duty and restraint. She insists that Allegra focus on her studies to become a doctor.

Meanwhile free-spirited Joy is full of colour, possibility and emotion, storing all her tears in little glass bottles. She is riding the second wave of the women’s movement in the company of her penny tortoise, Simone de Beauvoir, encouraging Ally to explore broad horizons and live her ‘true essence’.

And then there’s Rick who lives in a flat out the back and finds distraction in gambling and solace in surfing. He’s trying to be a good father to Al Pal, while grieving the woman who links them all but whose absence tears them apart.

Allegra is left to orbit these three worlds wishing they loved her a little less and liked each other a lot more. Until one day the unspoken tragedy that’s created this division explodes within the person they all cherish most.


 

CrossingsCrossings
Alex Landragin

I didn’t write this book. I stole it…

A Parisian bookbinder stumbles across a manuscript containing three stories, each as unlikely as the other.

The first, ‘The Education of a Monster’, is a letter penned by the poet Charles Baudelaire to an illiterate girl. The second, ‘City of Ghosts’, is a noir romance set in Paris in 1940 as the Germans are invading. The third, ‘Tales of the Albatross’, is the strangest of the three: the autobiography of a deathless enchantress. Together, they tell the tale of two lost souls peregrinating through time.

An unforgettable tour de force, Crossings is a novel in three parts, designed to be read in two different directions, spanning a hundred and fifty years and seven lifetimes.


 

Something to Live ForSomething to Live For
Richard Roper

Sometimes you have to risk everything to find your something…

All Andrew wants is to be normal. He has the perfect wife and 2.4 children waiting at home for him after a long day. At least, that’s what he’s told people.

The truth is, his life isn’t exactly as people think and his little white lie is about to catch up with him.

Because in all Andrew’s efforts to fit in, he’s forgotten one important thing: how to really live. And maybe, it’s about time for him to start.


 

Electric HotelThe Electric Hotel
Dominic Smith

Dominic Smith’s The Electric Hotel winds through the nascent days of cinema in Paris and Fort Lee, New Jersey–America’s first movie town–and on the battlefields of Belgium during World War I. A sweeping work of historical fiction, it shimmers between past and present as it tells the story of the rise and fall of a prodigious film studio and one man’s doomed obsession with all that passes in front of the viewfinder.

For nearly half a century, Claude Ballard has been living at the Hollywood Knickerbocker Hotel. A French pioneer of silent films, who started out as a concession agent for the Lumiere brothers, the inventors of cinema, Claude now spends his days foraging mushrooms in the hills of Los Angeles and taking photographs of runaways and the striplings along Sunset Boulevard. But when a film-history student comes to interview Claude about The Electric Hotel–the lost masterpiece that bankrupted him and ended the career of his muse, Sabine Montrose–the past comes surging back. In his run-down hotel suite, the ravages of the past are waiting to be excavated: celluloid fragments and reels in desperate need of restoration, and Claude’s memories of the woman who inspired and beguiled him.

From the award-winning author of the acclaimed New York Times bestseller The Last Painting of Sara de Vos comes a luminous novel tracing the intertwined fates of a silent-film director and his muse.


City of GirlsCity of Girls
Elizabeth Gilbert

It is the summer of 1940. Nineteen-year-old Vivian Morris arrives in New York with her suitcase and sewing machine, exiled by her despairing parents. Although her quicksilver talents with a needle and commitment to mastering the perfect hair roll have been deemed insufficient for her to pass into her sophomore year of Vassar, she soon finds gainful employment as the self-appointed seamstress at the Lily Playhouse, her unconventional Aunt Peg’s charmingly disreputable Manhattan revue theatre. There, Vivian quickly becomes the toast of the showgirls, transforming the trash and tinsel only fit for the cheap seats into creations for goddesses.

Exile in New York is no exile at all: here in this strange wartime city of girls, Vivian and her girlfriends mean to drink the heady highball of life itself to the last drop. And when the legendary English actress Edna Watson comes to the Lily to star in the company’s most ambitious show ever, Vivian is entranced by the magic that follows in her wake. But there are hard lessons to be learned, and bitterly regrettable mistakes to be made. Vivian learns that to live the life she wants, she must live many lives, ceaselessly and ingeniously making them new.


HitchHitch
Kathryn Hind

Amelia stands beside a highway in the Australian desert, alone except for her dog and the occasional road train that speeds past her raised thumb.

After her mother’s funeral, Amelia was confronted by Zach and reminded of the relationship they had when she was a teenager. She feels complicit and remains unable to process what happened. So she ran. Her best friend, Sid, is Zach’s cousin and the one person in the world she can depend upon.

But, of course, the road isn’t safe either. Amelia is looking for generosity or human connection in the drivers she finds lifts with, and she does receive that. But she is also let down.

Hitch is a raw exploration of consent and its ambiguities, personal agency and the choices we make. It’s the story of twenty-something Amelia and her dog Lucy hitchhiking from one end of the country to the other, trying to outrun grief and trauma, and moving ever closer to the things she longs to escape.


 

The SubjectsThe Subjects
Sarah Hopkins

As we got closer I could see behind the sandstone a curved concrete building: a purpose-built structure. But still no fence, no wire. Not a bar in sight. For this, I’d been told that morning, I should be grateful. This was a ‘lifeline…a last chance’. That is what the judge said.

Daniel is a sixteen-year-old drug dealer and he’s going to jail.

Then, suddenly, he’s not.

A courtroom intervention. A long car ride to a big country house. Other ‘gifted delinquents’: the elusive, devastating Rachel, and Alex, so tightly wound he seems about to shatter.

So where are they? It’s not a school, despite the ‘lessons’ with the headsets and changing images. It’s not a psych unit—not if the absence of medication means anything. It’s not a jail, because Daniel’s free to leave. Or that’s what they tell him.

He knows he and the others are part of an experiment.

But he doesn’t know who’s running it or what they’re trying to prove. And he has no idea what they’re doing to him.


 

White GirlThe White Girl
Tony Birch

Odette Brown has lived her whole life on the fringes of a small country town. Raising her granddaughter Sissy on her own, Odette has managed to stay under the radar of the welfare authorities who are removing Aboriginal children from their communities. When the menacing Sergeant Lowe arrives in town, determined to fully enforce the law, any freedom that Odette and Sissy enjoy comes under grave threat. Odette must make an impossible choice to protect her family.

In The White Girl, Tony Birch has created memorable characters whose capacity for love and courage are a timely reminder of the endurance of the human spirit.


 

Whisper ManThe Whisper Man
Alex North

If you leave a door half-open, soon you’ll hear the whispers spoken . . .

Still devastated after the loss of his wife, Tom Kennedy and his young son Jake move to the sleepy village of Featherbank, looking for a fresh start.

But Featherbank has a dark past. Fifteen years ago a twisted serial killer abducted and murdered five young boys. Until he was finally caught, the killer was known as ‘The Whisper Man’.

Of course, an old crime need not trouble Tom and Jake as they try to settle in to their new home. Except that now another boy has gone missing. And then Jake begins acting strangely.

He says he hears a whispering at his window . . .


 

Lifetime of Impossible DaysA Lifetime of Impossible Days
Tabitha Bird

Meet Willa Waters, aged 8… 33… and 93.

On one impossible day in 1965, eight-year-old Willa receives a mysterious box containing a jar of water and the instruction: ‘One ocean: plant in the backyard.’ So she does – and somehow creates an extraordinary time slip that allows her to visit her future selves.

On one impossible day in 1990, Willa is 33 and a mother-of-two when her childhood self magically appears in her backyard. But she’s also a woman haunted by memories of her dark past – and is on the brink of a decision that will have tragic repercussions…

On one impossible day in 2050, Willa is a silver-haired, gumboot-loving 93-year-old whose memory is fading fast. Yet she knows there’s something she has to remember, a warning she must give her past selves about a terrible event in 1990. If only she could recall what it was.

Can the three Willas come together, to heal their past and save their future, before it’s too late?


 

 

Big SkyBig Sky (A Jackson Brodie Novel)
Kate Atkinson

Jackson Brodie has relocated to a quiet seaside village, in the occasional company of his recalcitrant teenage son and an ageing Labrador, both at the discretion of his ex-partner Julia. It’s picturesque, but there’s something darker lurking behind the scenes.

Jackson’s current job, gathering proof of an unfaithful husband for his suspicious wife, is fairly standard-issue, but a chance encounter with a desperate man on a crumbling cliff leads him into a sinister network—and back across the path of someone from his past. Old secrets and new lies intersect in this breathtaking novel by one of the most dazzling and surprising writers at work today.


 

My Life as a RatMy Life as a Rat
Joyce Carol Oates

Once I’d been Daddy’s favourite. Before something terrible happened.

Violet Rue is the baby of the seven Kerrigan children and adores her big brothers. What’s more, she knows that a family protects its own. To go outside the family – to betray the family – is unforgiveable. So when she overhears a conversation not meant for her ears and discovers that her brothers have committed a heinous crime, she is torn between her loyalty to her family and her sense of justice. The decision she takes will change her life for ever.

Exploring racism, misogyny, community, family, loyalty, sexuality and identity, this is a dark story with a tense and propulsive atmosphere – Joyce Carol Oates at her very best.


 

NON-FICTION

Talking CureThe Talking Cure
Gillian Straker & Jacqui Winship

The essence of successful therapy is the relationship between the therapist and the patient, a dance of growing trust and understanding. It is an intimate, messy, often surprising and sometimes confusing business -but when it works, it’s life-changing.

In The Talking Cure, psychotherapists Gill Straker and Jacqui Winship bring us nine inspiring stories of transformation.

They introduce us to their clients, fictional amalgams of real-life cases, and reveal how the art of talking and listening helps us to understand deep-seated issues that profoundly influence who we are in the world and how we see ourselves in relation to others. We come to understand that the transformative power of the therapeutic relationship can be replicated in our everyday lives by the simple practice of paying attention and being present with those we love.

Whether you have experienced therapy (or are tempted to try it), or you are just intrigued by the possibilities of a little-understood but transformative process, this wise and compassionate book will deepen your sense of what it is to be open to connection – and your appreciation that to be human is to be a little bit mad.


 

IncentivologyIncentivology
Jason Murphy

Rewards. Punishments. Prices. The Nobel Prize. Candy Crush. Incentives take more forms than you might expect and they can be hard to spot, but they shape our lives in ways that we rarely examine.

Some incentives are obvious, like for example, publicly committing to doing something you dislike in order to motivate you to do something difficult, like lose weight. But, many of the most powerful incentives are accidental, and invisible even to those who designed them. Some are tame – and some are most definitely not. Whether it’s bounties for criminals or Instagrammable meals, training your dog or saving the planet, incentives regularly backfire, go missing, mutate and evolve. Without oversight, their unintended consequences can have very global effects.  In Incentivology, economist Jason Murphy uncovers the huge incentive systems we take for granted and turns them inside out. In lively, entertaining prose he explores the mechanisms behind many spectacular failures and successes in our history, culture and everyday lives, and shows us how to use (or lose) incentives in our world at large.


 

Vanlife DiariesVanlife Diaries: Finding Freedom on the Open Road
Kathleen Morton

Step into the world of a new generation of modern gypsies: a range of professionals and creatives who have ditched conventional houses for the freedom of the road and the beauty of the outdoors.Vanlife Diaries celebrates the nomadic lifestyle and community through interviews, advice for living on the road, and more than two hundred photos of these tiny rolling homes.

The book features vanlifers, their pets, and their converted vans and buses—VWs, Sprinters, Toyotas, and more—as well as the stunning natural locations that are part of the movement’s inspiration. Interviews and narrative captions share the stories of these dreamers and seekers, their inspiration for downsizing, how they found and converted their vehicle, and what it’s like to work and live on the road.


 

SplitSplit
Various (Edited by Lee Kofman)

In this compelling anthology of personal essays, curated by award-winning author Lee Kofman, some of Australia’s most beloved writers reveal, for the first time, powerful, occasionally funny and often heartbreaking stories of significant endings and their aftermath.

Graeme Simsion, author of The Rosie Project, shares how he discarded his past – perhaps autistic – self, while comedian Sami Shah writes about his public split from Islam, the religion of his birth. Ramona Koval delves into the bittersweet end to her career at the ABC and Fiona Wright explores how her anorexia has affected her romantic relationships. Whereas Kate Holden suggests that for some, splitting – whether from memorabilia, books or lovers – is unimaginable.

Join eighteen acclaimed storytellers in their candid and courageous reflections on the intrinsic human experience of loss and leaving, which acknowledge the price we can often pay for a much-needed end, or new beginning.


 

Chanel's RivieraChanel’s Riviera: Life, Love and the Struggle for Survival on the Cote d Azur, 1930-1944
Anne de Courcy

Far from worrying about the onset of war, in the spring of 1938 the burning question on the French Riviera was whether one should curtsey to the Duchess of Windsor. Few of those who had settled there thought much about what was going on in the rest of Europe. It was a golden, glamorous life, far removed from politics or conflict.

Featuring a sparkling cast of artists, writers and historical figures including Winston Churchill, Daisy Fellowes, Salvador Dali, the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, Eileen Gray and Edith Wharton, with the enigmatic Coco Chanel at its heart, Chanel’s Riviera is a captivating account of a period that saw some of the deepest extremes of luxury and terror in the whole of the twentieth century.

From Chanel’s first summer at her Roquebrune villa La Pausa (in the later years with her German lover) amid the glamour of the pre-war parties and casinos in Antibes, Nice and Cannes to the horrors of evacuation and the displacement of thousands of families during the Second World War, Chanel’s Riviera explores the fascinating world of the Cote d’Azur elite in the 1930s and 1940s. Enriched with much original research, it is social history that brings the experiences of both rich and poor, protected and persecuted, to vivid life.


 

Breaking BadlyBreaking Badly
Georgie Dent

At 24, life was good for Georgie Dent. After graduating with top marks she had landed her dream job at a prestigious Sydney law firm and moved in with a boyfriend she adored. She had the world at her feet and no right to break. But she did. Badly.

Within a year Georgie was unemployed, back living with her parents and suffering such crippling anxiety that she ended up in a psychiatric hospital.

Breaking Badly is the story of a nervous breakdown in slow motion – a life that fell apart and what it took to put it back together again. Brutally honest and warmly engaging, it’s a must-read for anyone who sometimes feels close to the edge.


 

Healthy Slow CookerThe Healthy Slow Cooker
Ross Dobson

Everyone’s favourite set-and-forget device gets a healthy makeover with over 100 recipes you’ll want to cook again and again. Acclaimed food writer Ross Dobson has compiled his very favourite family pleasers, packed with veg, using smart carbs and with lots of flexibility for when you need to cater for those with dietary restrictions. Chapters include Sunday Suppers, Weekday Dinners, Set and Forget, Soups, Curry Night and Relaxed Weekend.


 

PlantopiaPlantopia
Camille Soulayrol

Leafy green houseplants, hardy succulents and cacti, and flowering perennials add as much to your daily sense of well- being as to the beauty of your home once you convert it into a plant paradise. Opening her book with all the essentials you need to cultivate twenty home varietals—from calathea to monstera to pilea peperomioides —with practical tips for repotting, watering, and sunlight recommendations, Elle Décor Idée co-editor Camille Soulayrol takes the houseplant trend to the next level by offering a broad program of gorgeous DIY projects. She shares step-by-step inspiration for creating terrariums and aquatic plant habitats, decorative tips for showcasing plants at home with wreathes or geometric frames that allow vines to thrive, and nature-inspired table setting ideas incorporating leaves and dried herbs. Tips on how to frame blossoms and leaves and how to create herbal dyes for textiles round out a rich palette of home decorating projects. Learn to leverage the benefits of specific plants through recipes for natural cosmetics, essential oils, and herbal infusions sourced from your houseplant haven.

Urban dwellers have finally caught on to the beauty, joy, and mindful benefits of bringing nature into the home, and this innovative book is essential reading to succeed in reinvigorating your interior using the diverse bounties of nature. Never has the art of creating an idyllic interior garden been covered in such a broad, accessible, and eye-catching volume, with its pastel color palette, innovative tutorials, and exquisite photography and illustrations.


 

Prettiest Horse in the Glue FactoryThe Prettiest Horse in the Glue Factory
Corey White

Corey White was a golden child. He knew this because his father would hit his mother and his sisters but not him. And his mother adored him so much she let him drop out of primary school.

After losing his father to jail and his mother to heroin, though, he became a target for cruelty and dysfunction in foster homes. A scholarship to a prestigious boarding school lifted him out of foster care and awakened a love of learning and reading for him, but this was soon overwhelmed by a crushing depression and drug addiction.

Through it all, he kept thinking – sometimes hoping, sometimes fearing – that he was destined for something bigger. Would he find salvation in the halls of a university, or a poetically grimy crack den, or through love? Or would the golden glow that had been in him since childhood ultimately fade, leaving only darkness and ruin?

The Prettiest Horse in the Glue Factory is a memoir of trauma and survival that will break your heart and then show you how to rebuild it. It is a powerful, lyrical and darkly funny debut from one of Australia’s brightest young comedians.


 

Quarterly Essay 74 Jensen ReckoningQuarterly Essay 74: The Reckoning – Election 2019
Erik Jensen

A dazzling and insightful look at the forthcoming federal election, built from pen portraits and reports from the campaign trail.

In Quarterly Essay 74, Erik Jensen considers what has gone wrong for the Coalition, and what prospects it has for renewal or collapse. He looks at Labor?s strengths and weaknesses, and what kind of government it might form.  Through interviews and close observation, Jensen homes in on the meaning of a transformative election.

Are we seeing the last days of the Liberal Party? Is Labor capable of forging a new accord for the nation? Does anyone have an answer to the voters’ disgust with politics as usual?


 

Before I ForgetBefore I Forget
Geoffrey Blainey

Now in his late-eighties, and listed by the National Trust as a ‘Living Treasure’, in Before I Forget Geoffrey Blainey reflects on his humble beginnings as the son of a Methodist Minister and school teacher, one of five children, and a carefree childhood spent in rural Victoria, from Terang to Leongatha, Geelong to Ballarat. From a young age these places ignited for Blainey a great affection for the Australian landscape, and a deep curiosity in Australia’s history. He longed to travel, and would climb atop the roof of their home to stare out at the Great Dividing Range and imagine the world beyond.

His mother created gardens wherever they went and had literary ambitions of her own; his father spent more on books than he could ever afford, and the library travelled with the family. Blainey’s devotion to the Geelong Football Club began in Newtown from where he’d watch his team play at Corio, and as a newsboy he developed an early interest in current affairs, following the dramas and triumphs of the Second World War and the political careers of local identities John Curtin and Robert Menzies. With a burning desire to see Sydney but barely a penny to his name, he hitched there with a schoolfriend to see the harbour that greeted the First Fleet, and visited the national theatre of Parliament House on the way home to see Billy Hughes, JT Lang, Arty Fadden, Arthur Calwell, Enid Lyons and hero Ben Chifley in action.

The course of Blainey’s life changed when he was awarded a scholarship to board at Wesley College in Melbourne – an opportunity that instilled in him a great love of learning, under the tutelage of a group of inspiring teachers. This flourished further at the University of Melbourne, first as a wide-eyed student at Queen’s Collage, where he was lectured by Manning Clarke, and later as a professor of history. Later he and Manning Clarke became great friends, both sitting on the Whitlam Government’s new Literature Board. Hours spent at Melbourne’s State Library as a student poring over the country’s old newspapers cemented his calling to become a professional historian. Like Clarke Blainey has always been compelled to visit the places of our historical interest, including places of archaeological and Indigenous significance. Now the author of over forty books, Geoffrey Blainey claims he has discovered Australia’s history his own way – and is still learning.

Warm, insightful and lyrically written, Before I Forget recounts the experiences and influences that have shaped the astonishing mind of Australia’s most loved historian. But in this book Blainey has given us something more – a fascinating and affectionate social history in and of itself.


 

My Seditious HeartMy Seditious Heart
Arundhati Roy

My Seditious Heart collects the work of a two-decade period when Arundhati Roy devoted herself to the political essay as a way of opening up space for justice, rights and freedoms in an increasingly hostile environment. Taken together, the essays speak in a uniquely spirited voice, marked by compassion, clarity and courage. Radical and superbly readable, they speak always in defence of the collective, of the individual and of the land, in the face of the destructive logic of financial, social, religious, military and governmental elites.

In constant conversation with the themes and settings of her novels, the essays form a near-unbroken memoir of Arundhati Roy’s journey as both a writer and a citizen, of both India and the world, from ‘The End of Imagination’, which begins this book, to ‘My Seditious Heart’, with which it ends.


 

Everything is Fucked A book about hopeEverything is F*cked: A Book About Hope
Mark Manson

We live in an interesting time. Materially, everything is the best it’s ever been—we are freer, healthier and wealthier than any people in human history. Yet, somehow everything seems to be irreparably and horribly f*cked—the planet is warming, governments are failing, economies are collapsing, and everyone is perpetually offended on Twitter. At this moment in history, when we have access to technology, education and communication our ancestors couldn’t even dream of, so many of us come back to an overriding feeling of hopelessness.

What’s going on? If anyone can put a name to our current malaise and help fix it, it’s Mark Manson. In 2016, Manson published The Subtle Art of Not Giving A F*ck, a book that brilliantly gave shape to the ever-present, low-level hum of anxiety that permeates modern living. He showed us that technology had made it too easy to care about the wrong things, that our culture had convinced us that the world owed us something when it didn’t—and worst of all, that our modern and maddening urge to always find happiness only served to make us unhappier. Instead, the “subtle art” of that title turned out to be a bold challenge: to choose your struggle; to narrow and focus and find the pain you want to sustain. The result was a book that became an international phenomenon, selling millions of copies worldwide while becoming the #1 bestseller in 13 different countries.

Now, in Everthing Is F*cked, Manson turns his gaze from the inevitable flaws within each individual self to the endless calamities taking place in the world around us. Drawing from the pool of psychological research on these topics, as well as the timeless wisdom of philosophers such as Plato, Nietzsche, and Tom Waits, he dissects religion and politics and the uncomfortable ways they have come to resemble one another. He looks at our relationships with money, entertainment and the internet, and how too much of a good thing can psychologically eat us alive. He openly defies our definitions of faith, happiness, freedom—and even of hope itself.

With his usual mix of erudition and where-the-f*ck-did-that-come-from humour, Manson takes us by the collar and challenges us to be more honest with ourselves and connected with the world in ways we probably haven’t considered before. It’s another counterintuitive romp through the pain in our hearts and the stress of our soul. One of the great modern writers has produced another book that will set the agenda for years to come.


 

No Man's LandNo Man’s Land
Kevin Sullivan

Instinctively, I release my pressure on the sidestick. Out of my subconscious, a survival technique from a previous life emerges: Neutralise! I’m not in control so I must neutralise controls. I never imagined I’d use this part of my military experience in a commercial airliner …

On routine flight QF72 from Singapore to Perth on 7 October 2008, the primary flight computers went rogue, causing the plane to pitch down, nose first, towards the Indian Ocean – twice.

The Airbus A330 carrying 315 passengers and crew was out of control, with violent negative G forces propelling anyone and anything untethered through the cabin roof.

It took the skill and discipline of veteran US Navy Top Gun Kevin Sullivan, captain of the ill-fated flight, to wrestle the plane back under control and perform a high-stakes emergency landing at a RAAF base on the WA coast 1200 kilometres north of Perth.

In No Man’s Land, the captain of the flight tells the full story for the first time. It’s a gripping, blow-by-blow account of how, along with his co-pilots, Sullivan relied on his elite military training to land the gravely malfunctioning plane and narrowly avert what could have been a horrific air disaster.

As automation becomes the way of the future, and in the aftermath of Ethiopian Airlines flight 302 and Lion Air flight JT610, the story of QF72 raises important questions about how much control we relinquish to computers and whether more checks and balances are needed.


 

WavesWaves
Donna Rawlins, Mark Jackson and Heather Potter

Every journey is perilous, every situation heartbreaking. Every refugee is a person forced by famine or war or fear to leave their home, their families, their friends and all they know. Children have travelled on the waves of migration to the shores of Australia for tens of thousands of years.

This book tells some of their stories. Waves is a narrative non-fiction book about the waves of migration to the shores of Australia.

MAY NEW RELEASES

FICTION

Doll FactoryThe Doll Factory
Elizabeth Macneal

London. 1850. The Great Exhibition is being erected in Hyde Park and among the crowd watching the spectacle two people meet. For Iris, an aspiring artist, it is the encounter of a moment – forgotten seconds later, but for Silas, a collector entranced by the strange and beautiful, that meeting marks a new beginning.

When Iris is asked to model for pre-Raphaelite artist Louis Frost, she agrees on the condition that he will also teach her to paint. Suddenly her world begins to expand, to become a place of art and love.

But Silas has only thought of one thing since their meeting, and his obsession is darkening . . .

The Doll Factory, the debut novel by Elizabeth Macneal, is an intoxicating story of art, obsession and possession.


 

Thousand ShipsA Thousand Ships
Natalie Haynes

This was never the story of one woman, or two. It was the story of all of them. . .

In the middle of the night, Creusa wakes to find her beloved Troy engulfed in flames. Ten seemingly endless years of brutal conflict between the Greeks and the Trojans are over, and the Greeks are victorious. Over the next few hours, the only life she has ever known will turn to ash . . .

The devastating consequences of the fall of Troy stretch from Mount Olympus to Mount Ida, from the citadel of Troy to the distant Greek islands, and across oceans and sky in between. These are the stories of the women embroiled in that legendary war and its terrible aftermath, as well as the feud and the fatal decisions that started it all. . .

Powerfully told from an all-female perspective, A Thousand Ships gives voices to the women, girls and goddesses who, for so long, have been silent.


Lovely and Terrible ThingA Lovely and Terrible Thing
Chris Womersley

Around you the world is swirling – you pass through a submerged town; the bakery, a wheelbarrow, a bike floating on its side on the main street, its steeples and trees barely visible through the thick water.

In the distance the wreck of the gunship HMS Elizabeth lolls on a sandbank a couple of miles from the shore. Oil slicks the canals of the capital and even now in the midst of the bombing, the old men still tell tales of mermaids in the shallows.

A pool, empty of water save for a brackish puddle at one end that has escaped the summer heat. A mess of fine bones and hanks of fur – the remains of mice or possums that have tumbled in, lured perhaps by the water. Two boys stand by its edge, watching a stolen bracelet flash through the humid air into the deep end.

In bestselling author Chris Womersley’s first short fiction collection, twenty macabre and deliciously enjoyable tales linked by the trickle of water that runs through them all will keep readers spellbound until their final, unexpected and unsettling twist…


 

TigerTiger
Polly Clark

Set across two continents, Tiger is a sweeping story of survival and redeeming love that plunges the reader into one of the world’s last wildernesses with blistering authenticity.

Frieda is a primatologist, sensitive and solitary, until a violent attack shatters her ordered world. In her new role as a zookeeper, she confronts a very different ward: an injured wild tiger.

Deep in the Siberian taiga, Tomas, a Russian conservationist, fears that the natural order has toppled. The king tiger has been killed by poachers and a spectacular tigress now patrols his vast territory as her own.

In a winter of treacherous competition, the path of the tigress and her cub crosses with an Udeghe huntress and her daughter. Vengeance must follow, and the fates of both tigers and people are transformed.

Learning of her tiger’s past offers Frieda the chance of freedom. Faced with the savage forces of nature, she must trust to her instinct and, like the tiger, find a way to live in the world.

A mesmerising literary novel set between the UK and Siberia about mothers, daughters and the wild side of female nature, from the prize-winning author of Larchfield.


 

Office of Gardens and PondsThe Office of Gardens and Ponds
Didier Decoin

The village of Shimae is thrown into turmoil when master carp-catcher Katsuro suddenly drowns in the murky waters of the Kusagawa river. Who now will carry the precious cargo of carp to the Imperial Palace and preserve the crucial patronage that everyone in the village depends upon?

Step forward Miyuki, Katsuro’s grief-struck widow and the only remaining person in the village who knows anything about carp. She alone can undertake the long, perilous journey to the Imperial Palace, balancing the heavy baskets of fish on a pole across her shoulders, and ensure her village’s future.

So Miyuki sets off. Along her way she will encounter a host of remarkable characters, from prostitutes and innkeepers, to warlords and priests with evil in mind. She will endure ambushes and disaster, for the villagers are not the only people fixated on the fate of the eight magnificent carp.

But when she reaches the Office of Gardens and Ponds, Miyuki discovers that the trials of her journey are far from over. For in the Imperial City, nothing is quite as it seems, and beneath a veneer of refinement and ritual, there is an impenetrable barrier of politics and snobbery that Miyuki must overcome if she is to return to Shimae.


 

5555
James Delargy

Wilbrook in Western Australia is a sleepy, remote town that sits on the edge of miles and miles of unexplored wilderness. It is home to Police Sergeant Chandler Jenkins, who is proud to run the town’s small police station, a place used to dealing with domestic disputes and noise complaints.

All that changes on a scorching day when an injured man stumbles into Chandler’s station. He’s covered in dried blood. His name is Gabriel. He tells Chandler what he remembers.  He was drugged and driven to a cabin in the mountains and tied up in iron chains. The man who took him was called Heath. Heath told Gabriel he was going to be number 55. His 55th victim.

Heath is a serial killer.

As a manhunt is launched, a man who says he is Heath walks into the same station. He tells Chandler he was taken by a man named Gabriel. Gabriel told Heath he was going to be victim 55.

Gabriel is the serial killer.

Two suspects. Two identical stories. Which one is the truth?


 

Master of My FateMaster of My Fate
Sienna Brown

William Buchanan lived an extraordinary life. Born a slave on a plantation in Jamaica, he escaped the gallows more than once. His part in the slave uprisings of the 1830s led to his transportation across the world as one of the convicts sent to New South Wales.

This is a story not only about a boy who fought against all odds in search of freedom, but also about a world not so long ago, when the violence of colonisation was in full force. It is a story of Jamaica, and Australia, but at its heart, it is a story about how one lives a life, whether slave or free man.

Steeped in history but full of lessons that resonate for us today, William Buchanan’s coming-of-age tale of survival and fate is a thrilling tale told in a singular voice, from a startling new talent in Australian writing.


 

Identity CrisisIdentity Crisis
Ben Elton

Why are we all so hostile? So quick to take offence? Truly we are living in the age of outrage.

A series of apparently random murders draws amiable, old-school Detective Mick Matlock into a world of sex, politics, reality TV and a bewildering kaleidoscope of opposing identity groups. Lost in a blizzard of hashtags, his already complex investigation is further impeded by the fact that he simply doesn’t ‘get’ a single thing about anything anymore.

Meanwhile, each day another public figure confesses to having ‘misspoken’ and prostrates themselves before the judgement of Twitter. Begging for forgiveness, assuring the public “that is not who I am”.

But if nobody is who they are anymore – then who the f**k are we?


 

The PorpoiseThe Porpoise
Mark Haddon

‘I really am so very, very sorry about this,’ he says, in an oddly formal voice… They strike the side of a grain silo. They are travelling at seventy miles per hour.

A newborn baby is the sole survivor of a terrifying plane crash.

She is raised in wealthy isolation by an overprotective father. She knows nothing of the rumours about a beautiful young woman, hidden from the world.

When a suitor visits, he understands far more than he should. Forced to run for his life, he escapes aboard The Porpoise, an assassin on his tail…

So begins a wild adventure of a novel, damp with salt spray, blood and tears. A novel that leaps from the modern era to ancient times; a novel that soars, and sails, and burns long and bright; a novel that almost drowns in grief yet swims ashore; in which pirates rampage, a princess wins a wrestler’s hand, and ghost women with lampreys’ teeth drag a man to hell – and in which the members of a shattered family, adrift in a violent world, journey towards a place called home.


 

Cari MoraCari Mora
Thomas Harris

Twenty-five million dollars in cartel gold lies hidden beneath a mansion on the Miami Beach waterfront. Ruthless men have tracked it for years. Leading the pack is Hans-Peter Schneider. Driven by unspeakable appetites, he makes a living fleshing out the violent fantasies of other, richer men.

Cari Mora, caretaker of the house, has escaped from the violence in her native country. She stays in Miami on a wobbly Temporary Protected Status, subject to the iron whim of ICE. She works at many jobs to survive. Beautiful, marked by war, Cari catches the eye of Hans-Peter as he closes in on the treasure. But Cari Mora has surprising skills, and her will to survive has been tested before.

Monsters lurk in the crevices between male desire and female survival. No other writer in the last century has conjured those monsters with more terrifying brilliance than the creator of Hannibal Lecter and The Silence of the LambsCari Mora, his sixth novel, is the long-awaited return of an American master.


 

Room for a StrangerRoom for a Stranger
Melanie Cheng

Since her sister died, Meg has been on her own. She doesn’t mind, not really—not with Atticus, her African grey parrot, to keep her company—but after her house is broken into by a knife-wielding intruder, she decides it might be good to have some company after all.

Andy’s father has lost his job, and his parents’ savings are barely enough to cover his tuition. If he wants to graduate, he’ll have to give up his student flat and find a homeshare. Living with an elderly Australian woman is harder than he’d expected, though, and soon he’s struggling with more than his studies.

From the author of Australia Day, winner of the 2018 Victorian Premier’s Literary Award for Fiction.


 

Blood RiverBlood River
Tony Cavanagh

Brisbane 1999. It’s hot. Stormy. Dangerous. The waters of the Brisbane River are rising. The rains won’t stop. People’s nerves are on edge. And then…

A body is found.
And then another.
And another.

A string of seemingly ritualised but gruesome murders. All the victims are men. Affluent. Guys with nice houses, wives and kids at private schools. All have had their throats cut. Tabloid headlines shout, THE VAMPIRE KILLER STRIKES AGAIN!

Detective Constable Lara Ocean knows the look. The ‘my-life-will-never-be-the-same-again look’. She’s seen it too many times on too many faces. Telling a wife her husband won’t be coming home. Ever again. Telling her the brutal way he was murdered. That’s a look you never get used to.

Telling a mother you need her daughter to come to the station for questioning. That’s another look she doesn’t want to see again.

And staring into the eyes of a murderer, yet doubting you’ve got it right. That’s the worst look of all – the one you see in the mirror. Get it right, you’re a hero and the city is a safer place. Get it wrong and you destroy a life. And a killer remains free. Twenty years down the track, Lara Ocean will know the truth.


 

The FlatshareThe Flatshare
Beth O’Leary

Tiffy and Leon share a flat
Tiffy and Leon share a bed
Tiffy and Leon have never met…

Tiffy Moore needs a cheap flat, and fast. Leon Twomey works nights and needs cash. Their friends think they’re crazy, but it’s the perfect solution: Leon occupies the one-bed flat while Tiffy’s at work in the day, and she has the run of the place the rest of the time.

But with obsessive ex-boyfriends, demanding clients at work, wrongly-imprisoned brothers and, of course, the fact that they still haven’t met yet, they’re about to discover that if you want the perfect home you need to throw the rulebook out the window…


 

Seven or Eight Deaths of Stella FortunaThe Seven or Eight Deaths of Stella Fortuna
Juliet Grames

When I tell you Stella Fortuna was a special girl, I hope you aren’t thinking small-town special. Other people would underestimate Stella Fortuna during her long life, and not one of them didn’t end up regretting it.

Hundred-year-old Stella Fortuna sits alone in her house in Wethersfield, Connecticut, crocheting blankets and angrily ignoring her sister, Tina, who lives across the street. Born into abject poverty in an Italian village, Stella Fortuna’s name might mean Lucky Star, but for the last century, her life has been defined by all the times she might have died. Up until now, Stella’s close bond with her sister has been one of the few things to survive her tumultuous life, but something has happened, and nobody can understand what it might be. Does the one life and many (near) deaths of Stella Fortuna have secrets still to be revealed, even to those who believe they are closest to her?

By turns a family saga, a ghost story, and a coming-of cranky-old-age tale, Juliet Grames’s The Seven or Eight Deaths of Stella Fortuna lays bare the costs of migration and patriarchal values, but also of the love and devotion that can sustain a family through generations, in a sprawling 20th century saga of a young woman with a fire inside her which cannot be put out.


 

NON-FICTION

Australia DayAustralia Day
Stan Grant

Since publishing his critically acclaimed, Walkley Award-winning, bestselling memoir Talking to My Country in early 2016, Stan Grant has been crossing the country, talking to huge crowds everywhere about how racism is at the heart of our history and the Australian dream. But Stan knows this is not where the story ends.

In this book, Australia Day, his long-awaited follow up to Talking to My Country, Stan talks about our country, about who we are as a nation, about the indigenous struggle for belonging and identity in Australia, and what it means to be Australian. A sad, wise, beautiful, reflective and troubled book, Australia Day asks the questions that have to be asked, that no else seems to be asking. Who are we? What is our country? How do we move forward from here?


 

Extraordinary InsectsExtraordinary Insects
Anne Sverdrup-Thygeson

Out of sight, underfoot, unseen beyond fleeting scuttles or darting flights, insects occupy a hidden world, yet are essential to sustaining life on earth.

Insects influence our ecosystem like a ripple effect on water. They arrived when life first moved to dry land, they preceded – and survived – the dinosaurs, they outnumber the grains of sand on all the world’s beaches, and they will be here long after us.

Working quietly but tirelessly, they give us food, uphold our ecosystems, can heal our wounds and even digest plastic. They could also provide us with new solutions to the antibiotics crisis, assist in disaster zones and inspire airforce engineers with their flying techniques.

But their private lives are also full of fun, intrigue and wonder – musical mating rituals; house-hunting for armies of beetle babies; metamorphosing into new characters; throwing parties in fermenting sap; cultivating fungi for food; farming smaller species for honey dew and always ensuring that what is dead is decomposed, ready to become life once again.

Here, we will discover life and death, drama and dreams, all on a millimetric scale. Like it or not, Earth is the planet of insects, and this is their extraordinary story.


 

Everything in its PlaceEverything in its Place
Oliver Sacks

From the best-selling author of Gratitude and On the Move, a final volume of essays that showcase Sacks’s broad range of interests-from his passion for ferns, swimming, and horsetails, to his final case histories exploring schizophrenia, dementia, and Alzheimer’s.

Oliver Sacks, scientist and storyteller, is beloved by readers for his neurological case histories and his fascination and familiarity with human behavior at its most unexpected and unfamiliar. Everything in Its Place is a celebration of Sacks’s myriad interests, told with his characteristic compassion and erudition, and in his luminous prose.


 

#metoo#MeToo
Miriam Sved, Christie Nieman, Maggie Scott and Natalie Kon-yu

In October 2017, the hashtag MeToo went viral.

Since then we’ve watched controversy erupt around Geoffrey Rush, Germaine Greer and Junot Díaz. We’ve talked about tracking the movement back via Helen Garner, Rosie Batty and Hannah Gadsby. We’ve discussed #NotAllMen, toxic masculinity and trolls. We’ve seen the #MeToo movement evolve and start to accuse itself – has it gone too far? Is it enough? What does it mean in this country?

And still, women are not safe from daily, casual sexual harassment and violence.

In this collection thirty-five contributors share their own #MeToo stories, analysis and commentary to survey the movement in an Australian context.

This collection resists victimhood. It resists silence. It insists on change.


 

2040 Handbook for Regeneration2040: A Handbook for the Regeneration
Damon Gameau

Like most of us, Damon Gameau has spent most of his adult years overwhelmed into inaction by the problem of climate change and its devastating effects on the planet. But when Damon became a father, he knew he couldn’t continue to look away. So he decided to do what he does best, and tell a story. And the story became an imagining of what the world could look like in 2040, if we all decided to start doing things differently, right now.

The result is the era-defining documentary 2040 - a meticulously researched plea for the adoption of community-building, energy-generating, connection-forging, forest-renewing, ocean-replenishing measures that science tells us will reset our planet’s health, drive our economies and improve lives across the globe.

2040: A Handbook for the Regeneration shows us how we can stitch this magnificent vision into everyday life by engaging in activities such as cooking, shopping, gardening, sharing, working and teaching our kids. It shows us that climate change is a practical problem that can be tackled by each of us, one small step at a time, and that we can make a genuine difference – if we know what to do.

Brimming with practical wisdom and even 50 delicious recipes, 2040: A Handbook for the Regeneration empowers you to become the change you want to see in the world.


 

CSIRO Protein PlusCSIRO Protein Plus
Professor Grant Brinkworth, Dr Jane Bowen and Genevieve James-Martin

Over the past three decades, the CSIRO has conducted extensive research to understand diet and lifestyle strategies that optimise weight management, health and wellbeing for everyday Australians. Based on this research, scientists have found that a daily protein intake higher than the current recommendations suggest can benefit many people – namely, people who are trying to lose weight; those who need to gain muscle mass; older people who want to stay physically strong and active as they age; and those following a strictly plant-based diet.

CSIRO Protein Plus applies the exciting emerging science behind the potential additional benefits that can be achieved by evenly distributing protein across the day. This includes incorporating protein-rich foods at regular meals, with an emphasis on greater protein intake at breakfast as part of a healthy eating plan.

This dietary approach, when combined with resistance exercise training, potentially further enhances the effects of a higher-protein diet by promoting even greater appetite (and weight) control and improvements in body composition. These effects can benefit many individuals across the entire adult lifespan.

CSIRO Protein Plus is for anyone wanting an evidence-based strategy for achieving weight loss or general weight management, and for people wanting to improve their lifestyle for healthy ageing.


 

Full CatastropheThe Full Catastrophe
Rebecca Huntley and Sarah Macdonald

We’ve all had days when if we didn’t laugh, we’d cry. Whether it’s a domestic drama, career cockup or just a run-of-the-mill disaster, we’ve all been there – no matter who we are. In this hilarious and moving collection, well-known Australians from all walks of life share their stories as a kind of mass therapy; a feel-good tonic for when the proverbial sh*t hits the fan. From Annabel Crabb’s tale of Russian interference in the birth of her first child to Kate McClymont on how to manage mobsters, or Frank Moorhouse on the worst possible Valentine’s Day to Emma Alberici on moving to London with three small children, these entertaining tales of woe remind us that this too shall pass.


 

The RecipeThe Recipe 
Josh Emett

Michelin-starred chef Josh Emett brings together 300 of the most important classic recipes by 150 of the world’s most acclaimed chefs. Taken together, this is a compendium of the crème de la crème of blue ribbon cooking from the world’s top restaurants in an elegantly designed volume that will stand up to use in the kitchen but be classically beautiful to behold – sure to delight any food lover or serious home cook.

Josh Emett, holder of three Michelin stars and best known for opening Gordon Ramsay’s restaurant at the London Hotel in New York, has collected the most important classic recipes from the world’s most acclaimed chefs to create a kind of Larousse Gastronomique of the 21st century. These are the best new classics that have emerged during the last 50 years from culinary stars.

Each recipe has been tested by Emett in his home kitchen, and he includes guidance and advice for the home cook – discussing complexity, preparation, key elements, complements for planning a larger menu, and tips of the trade.

Featuring specially commissioned , the book is organised into 12 easy-to-follow sections from basics (stocks, sauces, and dressings), to grains and vegetables, meats, seafood, baking, and more. Each section includes a dedicated introduction with key knowledge elements.


 

Alpha GirlsAlpha Girls
Julian Guthrie

For all its trailblazing, world-shaping innovation, Silicon Valley has long been a mysterious, male-dominated world and, at its worst, a toxic environment in which to be a woman. Recent exposes have revealed sexist ‘bro-cultures’ at top tech companies, ranging from sexual harassment lawsuits in which women are routinely excluded from all-male ski trips to the partner at a leading VC firm who, when asked by a reporter whether there were talented females candidates on the job market, replied ‘we’re not prepared to lower our standards.’

How is it possible that a community with such forward-looking technology, could take such a backward approach to gender relations?

Alpha Girls dives into this enigmatic world, going behind the scenes at Facebook, Microsoft, McAfee, Google, Tesla and more to reveal the history of Silicon Valley from the point of view of the women who have witnessed and participated in its rise to global domination of the business landscape. Julian Guthrie focuses on a small group of self-made women who, outnumbered and underestimated, helped launch the modern computer industry, and are today renowned figures in the VC world of the Valley.

Alpha Girls is an inspiring, groundbreaking, true story about women taking enormous risks, playing by the men’s rules, juggling work and family, all the while refusing to be limited by the expectations of others. These alpha girls – as well as men in the industry – have granted Julian incredible, unprecedented access to an otherwise closed community.


 

Catalpa RescueThe Catalpa Rescue
Peter FitzSimons

New York, 1874. Members of the Clan-na-Gael – agitators for Irish freedom from the English yoke – hatch a daring plan to free six Irish political prisoners from the most remote prison in the British Empire, Fremantle Prison in Western Australia. Under the guise of a whale hunt, Captain Anthony sets sail on the Catalpa to rescue the men from the stone walls of this hell on Earth known to the inmates as a ‘living tomb’. What follows is one of history’s most stirring sagas that splices Irish, American, British and Australian history together in its climactic moment.

For Ireland, who had suffered English occupation for 700 years, a successful escape was an inspirational call to arms. For America, it was a chance to slap back at Britain for their support of the South in the Civil War; for England, a humiliation. And for a young Australia, still not sure if it was Great Britain in the South Seas or worthy of being an independent country in its own right, it was proof that Great Britain was not unbeatable.

Told with FitzSimons’ trademark combination of arresting history and storytelling verve, The Catalpa Rescue is a tale of courage and cunning, the fight for independence and the triumph of good men, against all odds.


 

Warndu MaiWarndu Mai (Good Food)
Rebecca Sullivan and Damien Coulthard

This gorgeous illustrated, informative and contemporary cookbook and compendium of native foods will show you how to create truly Australian food and drinks at home. With a few small adjustments and a little experimentation you can prepare delicious food that is better for the Australian environment, is more sustainable and celebrates the amazing ingredients that are truly local.

Warndu Mai (Good Food) contains information about seasonal availability, hints, tips and over 80 illustrated and accessible recipes showcasing Australian native foods, using ingredients such as Kakadu plum, native currants, finger lime and pepperberry to create unique dishes and treats – from wattleseed brownies, emu egg sponge cake and bunya nut pesto to native berry, cherry and lime cordial, strawberry gum pavlova and kangaroo carpaccio. It’s a must-have for every kitchen.


 

Little Girl on the Ice FloeThe Little Girl on the Ice Floe
Adelaide Bon

Adelaide Bon grew up in a wealthy neighborhood in Paris, a privileged child with a loving family, lots of friends and seemingly limitless opportunity lying ahead of her. But one sunny afternoon, when she was nine years old, a strange man followed her home and raped her in the stairwell of her building. She told her parents, they took her to the police, the fact of the crime was registered … and then a veil was quietly drawn over that part of her childhood, and life was supposed to go on.

Except, of course, it didn’t.

Throughout her adolescence and young adulthood, Adelaide struggles with the aftermath of the horror of that afternoon in 1990. The lingering trauma pervades all aspects of her life: family education, friendships, relationships, even her ability to eat normally. And then one day, many years later, when she is married and has a small son, she receives a call from the police saying that they think they have finally caught the man who raped her, a man who has hidden in plain sight for decades, with many other victims ready to testify against him. The subsequent court case reveals Giovanni Costa, the stuff of nightmares and bogeymen, finally vanquished by the weight of dozens and dozens of emotional and horrifying testimonies from all the women whose lives and childhoods he stole.


 

Raising Girls 21st CenturyRaising Girls in the 21st Century
Steve Biddulph

The revised and updated edition of the bestselling parenting classic

Raising Girls in the Twenty-first Century is Steve Biddulph’s warm, wise and up-to-the-minute look at how to help your daughter – at every age, from baby to teen. Girls today need to be strong, but also keep their hearts open. Steve brings the very best help from around the globe to build girls’ self-belief in a world that often wants to tear them down.

In this revised and updated edition, you’ll learn how to raise your daughter to:

  • have a joyful childhood and not be forced to grow up too fast

  • navigate the fraught world of friends, peer pressure and bullying

  • be free and wild, to reduce anxiety, depression and self-harm

  • avoid technology addiction and other social media pitfalls

  • relate to boys with a clear head and strong heart

There is also a powerful new section on ‘#MeToo in School’, shining a light on the reality of childhood sexual harassment, and how best to help your daughter fight it. Filled with unforgettable stories that will bring you to tears, and offering clear, practical help, Raising Girls in the Twenty-first Century is not just a guidebook but a fierce call-to-arms. The world’s best guide to girlhood is now in your hands.


 

Silent KingdomSilent Kingdom
Christian Vizl

Silent Kingdom reveals the world beneath the waves in an ethereal collection of black-and-white underwater photography.

Through stunning black-and-white images, award-winning photographer Christian Vizl uses a masterful control of light and shadow to portray the creatures of the sea as they are rarely seen, at home in the ethereal world beneath the waves.

From capturing the ferocity of sharks to the playful dance of dolphins, Vizl turns aquatic creatures and marine seascapes into visions of sublime grace and beauty suspended in time and space. With each turn of the page, venture deeper into the one realm in which humans do not reign and discover an unforgettable world that few have ever seen.

Though the ocean covers over 70 percent of planet Earth, over 80 percent of that vast wilderness remains unexplored. As human activity begins to impact these once-untouched regions, it is more important now than ever to acknowledge both the beauty and value of our seas and the necessity of preserving one of the last true wild frontiers of our world.

Silent Kingdom is both an ode both to the beauty of the ocean and  the magnificent creatures that inhabit it and a call to action to preserve the fragile underwater world of our planet.


 

Anxious KidsAnxious Kids
Michael Grose and Dr Jodi Richardson

Bestselling parenting author Michael Grose and wellbeing expert Dr Jodi Richardson explain why more children than ever before experience anxiety. In plain language that can be shared with children, they outline the origins and biology of anxiety to make sense of it – key knowledge such as why it happens, the flood of physical symptoms that comes with it, how to calm it down and why each strategy works.

Grose and Richardson also give advice on a range of important steps parents can take to develop emotional intelligence, tolerance of discomfort, mindfulness, resilience, thinking skills and flourishing mental health. In so doing, parents can reduce the impact of anxiety, enabling children of all ages to live their lives in full colour.

Anxious Kids offers parents a new perspective on their children’s anxiety, encouraging them to view each episode as an opportunity to empower their kids with the skills to manage anxiety, and thrive.


 

Stay Hungry Stay FoolishStay Hungry, Stay Foolish: Advice for the Rest of Your Life – Classic Graduation Speeches

Graduation day is a pivotal moment. After a lifetime of learning, and at least three years of studying hard in a chosen subject, we are thrown headfirst into the unknown world of adulthood. That day – and the months afterwards – are ripe with possibility. They can feel by turns thrilling and rudderless, dreamy and terrifying. It’s the perfect time to reflect on the past and look at what’s to come.

In this collection of carefully curated speeches, hear from leading voices such as Barack Obama, Gloria Steinem and Tim Minchin, and discover their profound advice for the graduating classes of Harvard, Stanford and many more top-class universities, who have gone on to shape the world we live in.

Whether you’re looking for the perfect graduation gift, a memento of this significant life moment, or are simply seeking guiding inspiration, the lessons in Stay Hungry, Stay Foolish will last a lifetime.


 

UpheavalUpheaval: How Nations Cope with Crisis and Change
Jared Diamond

In his landmark international bestsellers Guns, Germs and Steel and Collapse, Jared Diamond transformed our understanding of what makes civilizations rise and fall. Now in the third book in this monumental trilogy, he reveals how successful nations recover from crisis.

Diamond shows us how seven countries have survived defining upheavals in the recent past – from the forced opening up of Japan and the Soviet invasion of Finland to the Pinochet regime in Chile – through selective change, a process of painful self-appraisal and adaptation more commonly associated with personal trauma. Looking ahead to the future, he investigates whether the United States, and the world, are squandering their natural advantages and are on a devastating path towards catastrophe. Is this fate inevitable? Or can we still learn from the lessons of the past?

Exhibiting the awe-inspiring grasp of history, geography, economics and anthropology that marks all Diamond’s work, Upheaval reveals how both nations and individuals can become more resilient. The result is a book epic in scope, but also his most personal yet.

APRIL BEST SELLERS

FICTION

Boy Swallows Universe1. Boy Swallows Universe
Trent Dalton

Brisbane, 1983: A lost father, a mute brother, a mum in jail, a heroin dealer for a stepfather and a notorious crim for a babysitter. It’s not as if Eli’s life isn’t complicated enough already. He’s just trying to follow his heart, learning what it takes to be a good man, but life just keeps throwing obstacles in the way – not least of which is Tytus Broz, legendary Brisbane drug dealer.

But Eli’s life is about to get a whole lot more serious. He’s about to fall in love. And, oh yeah, he has to break into Boggo Road Gaol on Christmas Day, to save his mum.

A story of brotherhood, true love and the most unlikely of friendships, Boy Swallows Universe will be the most heartbreaking, joyous and exhilarating novel you will read all year.


Hollow Bones2. The Hollow Bones
Leah Kaminsky

“I remember you once told me about mockingbirds and their special talents for mimicry. They steal the songs from others, you said. I want to ask you this: how were our own songs stolen from us, the notes dispersed, while our faces were turned away?”

Berlin, 1936. Ernst Schäfer, a young, ambitious zoologist and keen hunter and collector, has come to the attention of Heinrich Himmler, who invites him to lead a group of SS scientists to the frozen mountains of Tibet. Their secret mission: to search for the origins of the Aryan race. Ernst has doubts initially, but soon seizes the opportunity to rise through the ranks of the Third Reich.

While Ernst prepares for the trip, he marries Herta, his childhood sweetheart. But Herta, a flautist who refuses to play from the songbook of womanhood and marriage under the Reich, grows increasingly suspicious of Ernst and his expedition.

When Ernst and his colleagues finally leave Germany in 1938, they realise the world has its eyes fixed on the horror they have left behind in their homeland.

A lyrical and poignant cautionary tale, The Hollow Bones brings to life one of the Nazi regime’s little-known villains through the eyes of the animals he destroyed and the wife he undermined in the name of science and cold ambition.


Place on Dalhousie3. The Place on Dalhousie
Melina Marchetta

‘You look the type to break your father’s heart.’
‘Yeah, but he broke mine first.’

When Rosie Gennaro first meets Jimmy Hailler, she has walked away from life in Sydney, leaving behind the place on Dalhousie that her father, Seb, painstakingly rebuilt for his family but never saw completed. Two years later, Rosie returns to the house and living there is Martha, whom Seb Gennaro married less than a year after the death of Rosie’s mother. Martha is struggling to fulfil Seb’s dream, while Rosie is coming to terms with new responsibilities. And so begins a stand-off between two women who refuse to move out of the home they both lay claim to.

As the battle lines are drawn, Jimmy Hailler re-enters Rosie’s life. Having always watched other families from the perimeters, he’s now grappling, heartbreakingly, with forming one of his own . . .

An unforgettable story about losing love and finding love; about the interconnectedness of lives and the true nature of belonging, from one of our most acclaimed writers.


Eleanor Oliphant4. Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine
Gail Honeyman

Eleanor Oliphant leads a simple life. She wears the same clothes to work every day, eats the same meal deal for lunch every day and buys the same two bottles of vodka to drink every weekend.

Eleanor Oliphant is happy. Nothing is missing from her carefully timetabled life. Except, sometimes, everything.

One simple act of kindness is about to shatter the walls Eleanor has built around herself. Now she must learn how to navigate the world that everyone else seems to take for granted – while searching for the courage to face the dark corners she’s avoided all her life.

Change can be good. Change can be bad. But surely any change is better than… fine?


Silent Patient5. The Silent Patient
Alex Michaelides

I love him so totally, completely, sometimes it threatens to overwhelm me. Sometimes I think- No. I won’t write about that.

ALICIA
Alicia Berenson writes a diary as a release, an outlet – and to prove to her beloved husband that everything is fine. She can’t bear the thought of worrying Gabriel, or causing him pain.

Until, late one evening, Alicia shoots Gabriel five times and then never speaks another word.

THEO
Forensic psychotherapist Theo Faber is convinced he can successfully treat Alicia, where all others have failed. Obsessed with investigating her crime, his discoveries suggest Alicia’s silence goes far deeper than he first thought.

And if she speaks, would he want to hear the truth?

The Silent Patient is a heart-stopping debut thriller about a woman’s brutal and random act of violence against her husband – and the man obsessed with discovering why.


Lost Man6. The Lost Man
Jane Harper

The man lay still in the centre of a dusty grave under a monstrous sky.

Two brothers meet at the border of their vast cattle properties under the unrelenting sun of outback Queensland.

They are at the stockman’s grave, a landmark so old, no one can remember who is buried there. But today, the scant shadow it casts was the last chance for their middle brother, Cameron.

The Bright family’s quiet existence is thrown into grief and anguish. Something had been troubling Cameron. Did he lose hope and walk to his death? Because if he didn’t, the isolation of the outback leaves few suspects…

For readers who loved The Dry and Force of Nature, Jane Harper has once again created a powerful story of suspense, set against a dazzling landscape.


Rosie Result7. The Rosie Result (Rosie series #3 – final)
Graeme Simsion

I was standing on one leg shucking oysters when the problems began…

Don Tillman and Rosie Jarman are back in Australia after a decade in New York, and they’re about to face their most important challenge.

Their son, Hudson, is struggling at school: he’s socially awkward and not fitting in. Don’s spent a lifetime trying to fit in—so who better to teach Hudson the skills he needs?

The Hudson Project will require the help of friends old and new, force Don to decide how much to guide Hudson and how much to let him be himself, and raise some significant questions about his own identity.

Meanwhile, there are multiple distractions to deal with: the Genetics Lecture Outrage, Rosie’s troubles at work, estrangement from his best friend Gene…

And opening the world’s best cocktail bar.

Hilarious and thought-provoking, with a brilliant cast of characters, The Rosie Resultis the triumphant final instalment of the much-loved and internationally bestselling Rosie trilogy.


Shepherd's Hut PB8. The Shepherd’s Hut
Tim Winton

Jaxie dreads going home. His mum’s dead. The old man bashes him without mercy, and he wishes he was an orphan. But no one’s ever told Jaxie Clackton to be careful what he wishes for.

In one terrible moment his life is stripped to little more than what he can carry and how he can keep himself alive. There’s just one person left in the world who understands him and what he still dares to hope for. But to reach her he’ll have to cross the vast saltlands on a trek that only a dreamer or a fugitive would attempt.

The Shepherd’s Hut is a searing look at what it takes to keep love and hope alive in a parched and brutal world.


Less9. Less
Andrew Sean Greer

***WINNER OF THE 2018 PULITZER PRIZE FOR FICTION***

Less is the story of a 49-year-old writer, Arthur Less, who learns that his former boyfriend is about to get married. To avoid the wedding and heartbreak, he decides to embark on a trip around the world, accepting invitations to a series of half-baked lectures and literary events.

From almost falling in love in Paris, almost falling to death in Berlin, to booking himself as the (only) writer on a residency in India, and an encounter in a desert with the last person on earth he wishes to see, Less is a novel about missteps, misunderstanding and mistakes.


The Scholar10. The Scholar
Dervla McTiernan

When Dr Emma Sweeney stumbles across the victim of a hit and run outside Galway University late one evening, she calls her partner, Detective Cormac Reilly, bringing him first to the scene of a murder that would otherwise never have been assigned to him.

A security card in the dead woman’s pocket identifies her as Carline Darcy, a gifted student and heir apparent to Irish pharmaceutical giant Darcy Therapeutics. The multi-billion-dollar company, founded by her grandfather, has a finger in every pie, from sponsoring university research facilities to funding political parties to philanthropy – it has funded Emma’s own ground-breaking research. The enquiry into Carline’s death promises to be high profile and high pressure.

As Cormac investigates, evidence mounts that the death is linked to a Darcy laboratory and, increasingly, to Emma herself. Cormac is sure she couldn’t be involved, but as his running of the case comes under scrutiny from the department and his colleagues, he is forced to question his own objectivity. Could his loyalty to Emma have led him to overlook evidence? Has it made him a liability?


NON-FICTION

The Erratics1. The Erratics
Vicki  Laveau-Harvie

***WINNER OF THE 2019 STELLA PRIZE***

‘We’ve been disowned and disinherited: there’s not changing it, I say. When something bad happens to them, we’ll know soon enough and we’ll deal with it together. I don’t realise it at the time, but when I say that, I imply I care. I imply there may be something to be salvaged. I misspeak. But I’m flying out anyway. Blood calls to blood; what can I tell you.’

This is a memoir about a dysfunctional family, about a mother and her daughters. But make no mistake. This is like no mother-daughter relationship you know.

When Vicki Laveau-Harvie’s elderly mother is hospitalised unexpectedly, Vicki and her sister travel to their parents’ isolated ranch home in Alberta, Canada, to help their father. Estranged from their parents for many years, Vicki and her sister are horrified by what they discover on their arrival. For years, Vicki’s mother has camouflaged her manic delusions and savage unpredictability, and over the decades she has managed to shut herself and her husband away from the outside world, systematically starving him and making him a virtual prisoner in his own home. Vicki and her sister have a lot to do, in very little time, to save their father. And at every step they have to contend with their mother, whose favourite phrase during their childhood was: ‘I’ll get you and you won’t even know I’m doing it.’

A ferocious, sharp, darkly funny and wholly compelling memoir of families, the pain they can inflict and the legacy they leave, The Erratics has the tightly coiled, compressed energy of an explosive device – it will take your breath away.


Educated2. Educated
Tara Westover

Tara Westover grew up preparing for the End of Days, watching for the sun to darken, for the moon to drip as if with blood. She spent her summers bottling peaches and her winters rotating emergency supplies, hoping that when the World of Men failed, her family would continue on, unaffected.

She hadn’t been registered for a birth certificate. She had no school records because she’d never set foot in a classroom, and no medical records because her father didn’t believe in doctors or hospitals. According to the state and federal government, she didn’t exist.

As she grew older, her father became more radical, and her brother, more violent. At sixteen Tara decided to educate herself. Her struggle for knowledge would take her far from her Idaho mountains, over oceans and across continents, to Harvard and to Cambridge. Only then would she wonder if she’d travelled too far. If there was still a way home.

Educated is an account of the struggle for self-invention. It is a tale of fierce family loyalty, and of the grief that comes with the severing of the closest of ties. With the acute insight that distinguishes all great writers, from her singular experience Westover has crafted a universal coming-of-age story that gets to the heart of what an education is and what it offers: the perspective to see one’s life through new eyes, and the will to change it.


No Friend But the Mountains3. No Friend But the Mountains
Behrouz Boochani (Translated by Omid Tofighian)

***WINNER OF THE VICTORIAN PREMIER’S LITERARY PRIZE 2019 FOR LITERATURE AND FOR NON-FICTION***

Where have I come from? From the land of rivers, the land of waterfalls, the land of ancient chants, the land of mountains…

In 2013, Kurdish journalist Behrouz Boochani was illegally detained on Manus Island. He has been there ever since.

People would run to the mountains to escape the warplanes and found asylum within their chestnut forests…

This book is the result. Laboriously tapped out on a mobile phone and translated from the Farsi. It is a voice of witness, an act of survival. A lyric first-hand account. A cry of resistance. A vivid portrait through five years of incarceration and exile.

Do Kurds have any friends other than the mountains?


Becoming4. Becoming
Michelle Obama

In a life filled with meaning and accomplishment, Michelle Obama has emerged as one of the most iconic and compelling women of our era. As First Lady of the United States of America-the first African-American to serve in that role-she helped create the most welcoming and inclusive White House in history, while also establishing herself as a powerful advocate for women and girls in the U.S. and around the world, dramatically changing the ways that families pursue healthier and more active lives, and standing with her husband as he led America through some of its most harrowing moments. Along the way, she showed us a few dance moves, crushed Carpool Karaoke, and raised two down-to-earth daughters under an unforgiving media glare.

In her memoir, a work of deep reflection and mesmerizing storytelling, Michelle Obama invites readers into her world, chronicling the experiences that have shaped her-from her childhood on the South Side of Chicago to her years as an executive balancing the demands of motherhood and work, to her time spent at the world’s most famous address. With unerring honesty and lively wit, she describes her triumphs and her disappointments, both public and private, telling her full story as she has lived it-in her own words and on her own terms. Warm, wise, and revelatory, Becoming is the deeply personal reckoning of a woman of soul and substance who has steadily defied expectations-and whose story inspires us to do the same.


Barefoot Investor5. The Barefoot Investor
Scott Pape

This is the only money guide you’ll ever need.

That’s a bold claim, given there are already thousands of finance books on the shelves.

So what makes this one different?

Well, you won’t be overwhelmed with a bunch of ‘tips’ … or a strict budget (that you won’t follow).  You’ll get a step-by-step formula: open this account, then do this; call this person, and say this; invest money here, and not there. All with a glass of wine in your hand.

This book will show you how to create an entire financial plan that is so simple you can sketch it on the back of a serviette … and you’ll be able to manage your money in 10 minutes a week.

Sound too good to be true? It’s not.

This book is full of stories from everyday Aussies — single people, young families, empty nesters, retirees — who have applied the simple steps in this book and achieved amazing, life-changing results.

And you’re next.


Good Selfie6. The Good Selfie
Turia Pitt

Turia Pitt is living proof that, with the right mindset, anything is possible.

Caught in a grassfire while competing in a 100km ultramarathon in 2011, Turia suffered full thickness burns to 65% of her body. But surviving is the least of her achievements. One of Australia’s most admired and widely recognised people, Turia has gone on to become a bestselling author, two-time Ironman and humanitarian – raising well over a million dollars for not-for-profit Interplast. Through her online presence, books and online programs, Turia has inspired millions to live with more confidence, drop their fears and smash epic goals.

Her new book, The Good Selfie contains simple strategies to help kids and teens build self-confidence, get through hard times and go after massive goals. Its real, straight-talking and funny.


Fast 8007. The Fast 800
Dr Michael Mosley

Six years ago, Dr Michael Mosley started a health revolution with The 5.2 Fast Diet, telling the world about the incredible power of intermittent fasting.

In this book he brings together all the latest science (including a new approach: Time Restricted Eating) to create an easy-to-follow programme.

Recent studies have shown that 800 calories is the magic number when it comes to successful dieting – it’s an amount high enough to be manageable but low enough to speed weight loss and trigger a range of desirable metabolic changes.

Depending on your goals, you can choose how intensively you want to do the programme: how many 800-calorie days to include each week, and how to adjust these as you progress.

Along with delicious, low-carb recipes and menu plans by Dr Clare Bailey, The Fast 800 offers a flexible way to help you lose weight, improve mood and reduce blood pressure, inflammation and blood sugars.

Take your future health into your own hands.


Simple8. Ottolenghi SIMPLE
Yotam Ottolenghi

Everything you love about Ottolenghi, made simple.

Yotam Ottolenghi’s award-winning recipes are always a celebration: an unforgettable combination of abundance, taste and surprise. Ottolenghi SIMPLE is no different, with 130 brand-new dishes that contain all the inventive elements and flavour combinations that Ottolenghi is loved for, but with minimal hassle for maximum joy.

Bursting with colourful photography, Ottolenghi SIMPLE showcases Yotam’s standout dishes that will suit whatever type of cooking you find easy – whether that’s getting wonderful food on the table in under 30 minutes, using just one pot to make a delicious meal, or a flavoursome dish that can be prepared ahead and then served when you’re ready.

These brilliant, flavour-forward dishes are all SIMPLE in at least one (but very often more than one) way:

S – short on time: less than 30 minutes
I – 10 ingredients or less
M – make ahead
P – pantry
L – lazy
E – easier than you think

Ottolenghi SIMPLE is the stunning new cookbook we have all been wishing for: Yotam Ottolenghi’s vibrant food made easy.


Dark Emu Award Cover9. Dark Emu
Bruce Pascoe

Dark Emu argues for a reconsideration of the ‘hunter-gatherer’ tag for pre-colonial Aboriginal Australians and attempts to rebut the colonial myths that have worked to justify dispossession. Accomplished author Bruce Pascoe provides compelling evidence from the diaries of early explorers that suggests that systems of food production and land management have been blatantly understated in modern retellings of early Aboriginal history, and that a new look at Australia’s past is required.


the arsonist10. The Arsonist
Chloe Hooper

Shortlisted for the 2019 Victorian Premier’s Literary Awards for Non-fiction

On the scorching February day in 2009 that became known as Black Saturday, a man lit two fires in Victoria’s Latrobe Valley, then sat on the roof of his house to watch the inferno. In the Valley, where the rates of crime were the highest in the state, more than thirty people were known to police as firebugs. But the detectives soon found themselves on the trail of a man they didn’t know.

The Arsonist takes readers on the hunt for this man, and inside the strange puzzle of his mind. It is also the story of fire in this country, and of a community that owed its existence to that very element. The command of fire has defined and sustained us as a species – understanding its abuse will define our future.

A powerful real-life thriller written with Hooper’s trademark lyric detail and nuance, The Arsonist is a reminder that in an age of fire, all of us are gatekeepers.

An unexpected but wonderful surprise…

…2019 Regional Bookstore of the Year

At the annual independent booksellers conference in Adelaide last month, we were delighted to discover we had been voted by Australian publishers as the 2019 Regional Bookstore of the Year…in the whole of Australia!

The Leading Edge Group, who coordinates the conference, asks all publishers to nominate their top 3 metro and regional stores according to the following criteria:  

  • Successful and committed book retailing;

  • Excellence in in-store and online environment;

  • Community engagement such as book clubs/author events;

  • Operational expertise in areas such as buying, returns, and range management;

  • Creative marketing campaigns;

  • Engagement in LEB and publisher marketing initiatives and group events; and

  • Contributing to the viability of the entire book trade.

Our friends at Matilda’s Bookshop in Adelaide took out the prize for the Metro category, with runners up Readings and The Avenue Bookstore, while the other finalists in the Regional category were BooksPlus in Bathurst and The Bookshop Bowral.  We were humbled to be nominated with such high quality businesses and passionate booksellers.

We would like to extend our thanks to our amazing staff and our gratitude to our wonderful community, who continue to support us by shopping local and making Farrells the Mornington institution it is.   

Store of the Year award 2019

Also announced at the annual dinner, at which we enjoyed an amazingly moving performance from Archie Roach, were the annual Indie Book Awards.  The winners of these awards are chosen by independent booksellers around Austarlia, who are renowned for their love of books and reading, support new and emerging Australian authors and foster a love of quality writing.  The winning books for 2019 were:

  • Fiction Book of the Year: Bridge of Clay by Markus Zusak

  • Non-fiction Book of the Year: The Arsonist by Chloe Hooper

  • Debut Fiction Book of the Year: Boy Swallows Universe by Trent Dalton

  • Illustrated Non-fiction Book of Year: Welcome to Country by Marcia Langton

  • Children’s Book of the Year: Lenny’s Book of Everything by Karen Foxlee

  • Young Adult Book of the Year: A Song Only I Can Hear by Barry Jonsberg

  • Overall Book of the Year (selected from the winners of all categories): Boy Swallows Universe by Trent Dalton.

Indie winners 2019

 

APRIL NEW RELEASES

FICTION

SpringSpring
Ali Smith

Spring will come. The leaves on its trees will open after blossom. Before it arrives, a hundred years of empire-making. The dawn breaks cold and still but, deep in the earth, things are growing.

Unmissable third instalment in the bestselling, critically adored, dazzling inventive novel cycle, the Seasonal Quartet.


 

Machines Like MeMachines Like Me
Ian McEwan

Britain has lost the Falklands war, Margaret Thatcher battles Tony Benn for power and Alan Turing achieves a breakthrough in artificial intelligence. In a world not quite like this one, two lovers will be tested beyond their understanding.

Machines Like Me occurs in an alternative 1980s London. Charlie, drifting through life and dodging full-time employment, is in love with Miranda, a bright student who lives with a terrible secret. When Charlie comes into money, he buys Adam, one of the first batch of synthetic humans. With Miranda’s assistance, he co-designs Adam’s personality. This near-perfect human is beautiful, strong and clever – a love triangle soon forms. These three beings will confront a profound moral dilemma.

Ian McEwan’s subversive and entertaining new novel poses fundamental questions: what makes us human? Our outward deeds or our inner lives? Could a machine understand the human heart? This provocative and thrilling tale warns of the power to invent things beyond our control.


MetropolisMetropolis (Bernie Gunther #14)
Philip Kerr

Berlin, 1928, the dying days of the Weimar Republic shortly before Hitler and the Nazis came to power. It was a period of decadence and excess as Berliners – after the terrible slaughter of WWI and the hardships that followed – are enjoying their own version of Babylon. Bernie is a young detective working in Vice when he gets a summons from Bernard Weiss, Chief of Berlin’s Criminal Police. He invites Bernie to join KIA – Criminal Inspection A – the supervisory body for all homicide investigation in Kripo. Bernie’s first task is to investigate the Silesian Station killings – four prostitutes murdered in as many weeks. All of them have been hit over the head with a hammer and then scalped with a sharp knife.

Bernie hardly has time to acquaint himself with the case files before another prostitute is murdered. Until now, no one has shown much interest in these victims – there are plenty in Berlin who’d like the streets washed clean of such degenerates. But this time the girl’s father runs Berlin’s foremost criminal ring, and he’s prepared to go to extreme lengths to find his daughter’s killer.

Then a second series of murders begins – of crippled wartime veterans who beg in the city’s streets. It seems that someone is determined to clean up Berlin of anyone less than perfect. The voice of Nazism is becoming a roar that threatens to drown out all others. But not Bernie Gunther’s …


 

LannyLanny
Max Porter

There is a village outside London, no different from many others. Everyday lives conjure a tapestry of fabulism and domesticity.

This village belongs to the people who live in it and to the people who lived in it hundreds of years ago. It belongs to England’s mysterious past and its confounding present.

But it also belongs to Dead Papa Toothwort who has woken from his slumber and is listening, and watching.

He is watching Mad Pete the village artist. He is listening to ancient Peggy gossiping at her gate, to families recently moved here and to families dead for generations.

Dead Papa Toothwort hears them all as he searches, intently, for his favourite.

Looking for the boy.

Lanny.


 

The Never GameThe Never Game
Jeffery Deaver

A killer is changing the rules. One murder at a time . . .

You wake up all alone, in the middle of a forest, miles from anywhere.

Beside you lie five objects – a lighter, grease, picture-frame wire, a piece of silk, a bottle of water – which you will need to use if you want to survive.

You’ve been taken by the Whispering Man and there is no escape. He makes the rules and nobody ever gets out alive.

Enigmatic investigator Colter Shaw is fighting to stop the murders. But another victim has been snatched from her family and he’s running out of time.

In the darkest corner of Silicon Valley, a new breed of killer is emerging: someone with a deadly obsession, whose twisted game is spiralling out of control.


 

Place on DalhousieThe Place on Dalhousie
Melina Marchetta

‘You look the type to break your father’s heart.’
‘Yeah, but he broke mine first.’

When Rosie Gennaro first meets Jimmy Hailler, she has walked away from life in Sydney, leaving behind the place on Dalhousie that her father, Seb, painstakingly rebuilt for his family but never saw completed. Two years later, Rosie returns to the house and living there is Martha, whom Seb Gennaro married less than a year after the death of Rosie’s mother. Martha is struggling to fulfil Seb’s dream, while Rosie is coming to terms with new responsibilities. And so begins a stand-off between two women who refuse to move out of the home they both lay claim to.

As the battle lines are drawn, Jimmy Hailler re-enters Rosie’s life. Having always watched other families from the perimeters, he’s now grappling, heartbreakingly, with forming one of his own . . .

An unforgettable story about losing love and finding love; about the interconnectedness of lives and the true nature of belonging, from one of our most acclaimed writers.


 

RedemptionRedemption (Amos Decker #5)
David Baldacci

FBI Special Agent Amos Decker discovers that a mistake he made as a rookie detective may have led to deadly consequences in the latest Memory Manthriller in David Baldacci’s number one New York Times bestselling series.

Amos Decker and his FBI partner Alex Jamison are visiting his hometown of Burlington, Ohio, when he’s approached by an unfamiliar man. But he instantly recognizes the man’s name: Meryl Hawkins. He’s the first person Decker ever arrested for murder back when he was a young detective. Though a dozen years in prison have left Hawkins unrecognizably aged and terminally ill, one thing hasn’t changed: He maintains he never committed the murders.

Could it be possible that Decker made a mistake all those years ago? As he starts digging into the old case, Decker finds a startling connection to a new crime that he may be able to prevent, if only he can put the pieces together quickly enough…


 

Memories of the FutureMemories of the Future
Siri Hustvedt

Fresh from Minnesota and hungry for all New York has to offer, twenty-three-year-old S.H. embarks on a year that proves both exhilarating and frightening – from bruising encounters with men to the increasingly ominous monologues of the woman next door.

Forty years on, those pivotal months come back to vibrant life when S.H. discovers the notebook in which she recorded her adventures alongside drafts of a novel. Measuring what she remembers against what she wrote, she regards her younger self with curiosity and often amusement. Anger too, for how much has really changed in a world where the female presidential candidate is called an abomination?

A provocative, wildly funny, intellectually rigorous and engrossing novel by the internationally acclaimed author of What I Loved, illustrated with her own drawings.


 

Silver RoadThe Silver Road
Stina Jackson

Three years ago, Lelle’s daughter went missing in a remote part of Northern Sweden. Lelle has spent the intervening summers driving the Silver Road under the midnight sun, frantically searching for his lost daughter, for himself and for redemption.

Meanwhile, seventeen-year-old Meja arrives in town hoping for a fresh start. She is the same age as Lelle’s daughter was – a girl on the brink of adulthood. But for Meja, there are dangers to be found in this isolated place.

As autumn’s darkness slowly creeps in, Lelle and Meja’s lives are intertwined in ways, both haunting and tragic, that they could never have imagined.

An unforgettably atmospheric, prize-winning debut about a young woman’s disappearance and a lonely man’s obsession with discovering the truth.


Strawberry ThiefThe Strawberry Thief
Joanne Harris

Vianne Rocher has settled down. Lansquenet-sous-Tannes, the place that once rejected her, has finally become her home. With Rosette, her ‘special’ child, she runs her chocolate shop in the square, talks to her friends on the river, is part of the community. Even Reynaud, the priest, has become a friend.

But when old Narcisse, the florist, dies, leaving a parcel of land to Rosette and a written confession to Reynaud, the life of the sleepy village is once more thrown into disarray. The arrival of Narcisse’s relatives, the departure of an old friend and the opening of a mysterious new shop in the place of the florist’s across the square – one that mirrors the chocolaterie, and has a strange appeal of its own – all seem to herald some kind of change: a confrontation, a turbulence – even, perhaps, a murder…

The compelling new novel from the author of the best selling Chocolat.


 

Tiger CatcherThe Tiger Catcher
Paullina Simons

Julian lives a charmed life in Los Angeles. Surrounded by friends, he is young, handsome, and runs a successful business. Everything changes after he has a fateful encounter with a mysterious young woman named Josephine.

Julian’s world is turned upside down by a love affair that takes him-and everyone else in his life-by storm. For the two new lovers, the City of Angels is transformed into a magical playground.

But Josephine is not what she seems and carries secrets that threaten to tear them apart-seemingly forever.

A broken man, his faith in tatters, Julian meets a mysterious stranger who tells him how to find Josephine again if he is willing to give up everything and take a death-defying trip from which no one has ever returned.

So begins Julian and Josephine’s extraordinary adventure of love, loss, and the mystical forces that bind people across time and space. It is a journey that propels Julian toward an impossible choice which will lead him to love fulfilled … or to oblivion.

The Tiger Catcher takes readers from the depths of despair to the dizzying heights of joy in the first novel of an unforgettable trilogy of love lost and found. For all fans of Outlander, The Time Traveler’s Wife and Jojo Moyes.


 

Book of DreamsThe Book of Dreams
Nina George

Henri Skinner is on his way to meet his teenage son, Sam, for the first time when he is hit by a car after rescuing a child from drowning. He is rushed to a nearby hospital where he floats, comatose, between dreams about his childhood and the secrets that have kept him from his son. Sam reads about it in the newspaper – his father is a hero, now in a coma in hospital.

After the accident, Sam waits by Henri’s bedside every day. Due to a condition called synaesthesia, Sam can sense things the doctors can’t – he can see the colours of his father’s thoughts and dreams. At the hospital he also meets Eddie Tomlin, a woman forced to confront her love for Henri after all these years, and twelve-year old Madelyn Zeidler, another coma patient and the sole survivor of a traffic accident that killed her family.

The Book of Dreams is a beautiful, bittersweet story about what love means: the exquisite stirrings of first love, the love between fathers and sons, friendship and family, life, death – and making peace with the past in order to find a future.


 

True Story Maddie BrightThe True Story of Maddie Bright
Mary-Rose MacColl

In 1920, seventeen-year-old Maddie Bright gratefully accepts a job as a serving girl on the royal tour of Australia by Edward, Prince of Wales. Maddie’s talents soon earn her the respect of Helen Burns, the prince’s vivacious press secretary, and Rupert Waters, his most loyal man, and Maddie is in awe of Edward himself, the ‘people’s’ prince.

What starts as a desire to help her family, devastated by the recent war, becomes for Maddie a chance to work on something that matters. When the unthinkable happens, it is swift and life changing.

Decades later, Maddie Bright is living in a ramshackle house in Paddington, Brisbane. She has Ed, her drunken and devoted neighbour, to talk to, the television news to shout at, and door-knocker religions to join. But when London journalist Victoria Byrd gets the sniff of a story that might lead to the true identity of a famously reclusive writer, Maddie’s version of her own story may change.

1920, 1981 and 1997: the strands twist across the seas and over two continents to build a compelling story of love and fame, motherhood and friendship. Set at key moments in the lives of two of the most loved and hated figures of the twentieth century, in Maddie Bright, a reader will find a friend and, by novel’s close, that friend’s true and moving story.


NON-FICTION

Basket by the DoorA Basket by the Door: Recipes for Comforting Gifts and Joyful Gatherings
Sophie Hansen

Nothing says ‘I love you, I’ve got you and I’m here’ better than a parcel of food you’ve taken the time to make, wrap and deliver. So, season by season, here are 130 recipes to cook for loved ones who might be moving house, busy with a newborn, celebrating a milestone, recovering after illness, grieving, or just in need of a little love and appreciation.

A Basket by the Door is friendship, connection and heartfelt country hospitality made edible. There are recipes here for sharing and giving on every occasion: an easy bundle of fresh dips and lavosh biscuits to take along to drinks, portable breakfast to surprise a friend, a sturdy picnic cake and sandwiches in a basket for lunch (even in the office), comforting ragu and chocolate mousse to enjoy while wallowing on the sofa, and ideas to take when invited for dinner or a weekend away. Bake a chicken pie to cheer up a neighbour, invite friends over to make Christmas biscuits; fill jam jars with bright smoothies to bolster a new mother – the ways to connect and show you care with food are endless.


Doing JusticeDoing Justice: A Prosecutor’s Thoughts on Crime, Punishment and the Rule of Law
Preet Bharara

Multi-million-dollar fraud. Terrorism. Mafia criminality. Russian espionage. For eight years Preet Bharara, United States Attorney for the Southern District of New York, successfully prosecuted some of the most high-profile crimes in America. Along the way he gained notoriety as the ‘Sheriff of Wall Street’, was banned from Russia by Vladimir Putin and earned the distinction of being one of the first federal employees fired by Trump.

In Doing Justice, Bharara takes us into the gritty, tactically complex, often sensational world of America’s criminal justice system. We meet the wrongly accused and those who have escaped scrutiny for too long, the fraudsters and mobsters, investigators and interrogators, snitches and witnesses. We learn what justice is and the basics of building a case, and how judgement must be delivered not only with toughness, but with calmness, care and compassion.

This is not just a book about the law. This is a book about integrity, leadership, decision-making and moral reasoning – and one that teaches us how to think and act justly in our own lives.


 

Small Garden DesignSmall Garden Design
Paul Bangay

Paul Bangay is renowned for the expansive and elegant gardens with classical lines and symmetrical plantings that he has created in Australia and all over the world. Yet gardens on this grand scale are not accessible to everyone. With more of us living in apartments, townhouses and terraces, our gardens are now being squeezed into small spaces such as balconies, courtyards, lightwells or rooftops – and this makes for challenging garden design.

In Small Garden Design, Paul applies his 25 years of experience with gardens of all sizes to reveal how best to structure, design and choose plants for small spaces. Chapters on Balconies & Terraces, Rooftops, Inner City, Lightwells and Courtyards are lavishly illustrated with photos by Simon Griffiths and enhanced with lots of practical tips on plant types, paving, irrigation, soil, outdoor dining, lighting and making the space appear larger. In this accessible and practical book, Paul shows us ‘how to make the most of the small space you have, and how to transform it into the paradise that we all aspire to’.


 

OutragesOutrages: Sex, Censorship and the Criminalisation of Love
Naomi Wolf

Wolf illuminates a dramatic history – how a single English law in 1857 led to a maelstrom, with reverberations lasting down to our day.  That law was the Obscene Publications Act and it was a crucial turning point. Why? Because dissent and morality; ‘deviancy’ and ‘normalcy'; unprintable and printable were suddenly lawful concepts in the modern sense. This new law effectively invented modern obscenity.

Before 1857 it wasn’t ‘homosexuality’ – a term that didn’t yet exist – that was a crime, but simply the act of sodomy. But in a single stroke, not only was love between men illegal, but anything referring to this love also became obscene, unprintable, unspeakable. And writers, editors and printers became the gatekeepers with a responsibility to uphold the morals of the society – followed by serious criminal penalties if they didn’t. And as the act evolved, joined by other laws against sexual representation and speech, making their way to courts, the authors’ or artists’ intentions were deemed immaterial.

What mattered was if the work in question had a ‘tendency . . . to deprave and corrupt those whose minds are open to such immoral influences, and into whose hands a publication of this sort may fall’. Wolf paints the dramatic ways this set of laws and consolidation of what we would call homophobia and censorship, played out among a bohemian group of sexual dissidents, including Walt Whitman in America and the homosexual English critic John Addington Symonds – in love with Whitman’s homoerotic voice in Leaves of Grass – decades before the infamous 1895 trial of Oscar Wilde. She retrieves forgotten history of men and even young teenage boys, executed at the Old Bailey for ‘sodomy’ or even ‘the attempt’.

Algernon Charles Swinburne, Dante and Christina Rossetti, Walter Pater and painter Simeon Solomon, were among the writers and artists, and countless booksellers and printers, whose lives were shadowed with jeopardy from this emerging network of laws against speech and love.

She depicts both a fascinating story and, crucially, an important way of understanding how we arrived at our ideas of ‘normalcy’ and ‘deviancy’ – and the idea of the state’s purported need and right to police speech – ideas which are with us to this day.

Most powerfully, Wolf recounts how a dying Symonds helped write the book on ‘sexual inversion’ that created our modern understanding of homosexuality. She argues that his secret memoir, mined and explained here fully for the first time, together with a secretly published essay, evolved into what would become the first mainstream gay rights manifesto in the west – proving that the literature of love will ultimately triumph over censorship.


 

Moment of LiftThe Moment of Lift: How Empowering Women Changes the World
Melinda Gates

For the last twenty years, Melinda Gates has been on a mission. Her goal, as co-chair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, has been to find solutions for people with the most urgent needs, wherever they live. Throughout this journey, one thing has become increasingly clear to her: If you want to lift a society up, invest in women.

In this candid and inspiring book, Gates traces her awakening to the link between women’s empowerment and the health of societies. She shows some of the tremendous opportunities that exist right now to “turbo-charge” change. And she provides simple and effective ways each one of us can make a difference.

A personal statement of passionate conviction, this book tells of Gates’ journey from a partner working behind the scenes to one of the world’s foremost advocates for women, driven by the belief that no one should be excluded, all lives have equal value, and gender equity is the lever that lifts everything.


 

Growing up africanGrowing up African in Australia
Edited by Maxine Beneba Clarke

People of African descent have been in Australia for at least 200 years, yet their stories are largely missing from Australian writing.

Australians of the African diaspora have arrived here in many different ways- directly from the continent; via the Caribbean, the Americas and the United Kingdom; making the journey to Australia over one generation, or several.What is it like to grow up African in Australia?

This anthology, compiled by award-winning author Maxine Beneba Clarke with curatorial assistance from writers Ahmed Yussuf and Magan Magan, showcases diverse voices, experiences and stories in order to answer that question. Accounts from well-known authors and high-profile cultural and sporting identities sit alongside newly discovered voices of all ages, with experiences spanning regions, cities and generations. All of the pieces call for understanding, oftentimes challenging stereotypes, always demanding respect.

Growing Up African aims to defy, question or shed light on the many stereotypes that currently exist about the vibrant extended African community in Australia.Contributors include Faustina Agolley, Santilla Chingaipe, Carly Findlay, Khalid Warsame, Nyadol Nyuon, Tariro Mavondo, Magan Magan and many, many more.


 

BazaarBazaar
Sabrina Ghayour

bazaar 
noun: a market in the Middle East

Bazaar is a colourful, flavourful and satisfying celebration of vegetable dishes, designed to suit every occasion and every palate. The magic of this cookbook is that you won’t feel like anything is missing, with dishes full of easy-to-achieve flavours and depth that would win over even the most die-hard carnivore.

Each recipe utilizes the abundance of varied flavour profiles of the East, from spices, herbs and perfumed aromatics to hearty staples such as grains and pulses, combined with plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables. You will find salads for all seasons, spectacular sides, bowl comfort, moreish mains and sweet treats.


 

Landscape Painting NowLandscape Painting Now
Todd Bradway & Barry Schwabsky

Whether as a reaction to our technological present or as a manifestation of fears concerning our environmental future, depictions of the natural world in painting have never seemed more pertinent or urgent. Some of the most ambitious, crucial and intellectually vibrant paintings being created in this century involve the landscape – from a more traditional, perceptual based approach for rendering vistas to a looser, topography-inspired gestural abstraction that blurs the line between form and space, to many other modes in between. Surprisingly, there has not been an ambitious and wide-reaching publication on the subject – until now.

The result of several years’ worth of research, Landscape Painting Now is the first book to explore the very best contemporary landscape painting. Featuring artists from nearly twenty-five countries born over seven decades, it includes some of the brightest stars of the contemporary art world. It is introduced by an essay from Barry Schwabsky, who discusses the history of landscape painting, exploring how the genre developed through the 20th century to today, and how it has become increasingly relevant to art now. He also explores the notion of what is actually called a landscape painting today, and looks to expand beyond commonly held preconceptions concerning the genre.


 

Chefs Eat Breakfast TooChefs Eat Breakfast too
Darren Purchese

This epic collection of breakfast recipes will have you going to bed early in anticipation.

Darren Purchese may be the sweetest chef in town, but you’ll love his savoury side as well, with perfect eggs, delicious breakfast bowls and even breakfast pizza or chicken congee with crispy doughnuts. And then of course there’s the best way to start (or end) your day: Bressert (Breakfast Dessert). Who wouldn’t be tempted by chocolate streusel brioche or chocolate and vanilla glazed doughnuts?

So get up and get creative in the kitchen.


 

Teen BrainTeen Brain
David Gillespie

With their labile and rapidly developing brains, adolescents are particularly susceptible to addiction, and addiction leads to anxiety and depression.

What few parents will know is that what we think of as the most typical addictions and problematic teen behaviours – smoking, drinking, drug taking, sex leading to teenage pregnancy – are on the decline.

The bad news is that a whole raft of addictions has taken their place. Whereas once the dopamine-hungry brain of a teenager got its fix from smoking a joint or sculling a Bundy and coke, it is now turning to electronic devices for the pleasure jolt that typically comes from online playing games and engaging with social media.

What is doubly troubling is that, unlike drugs, alcohol and cigarettes, electronic devices are not illicit. Quite the contrary. They are liberally distributed by schools and parents, with few restrictions placed on their use.

And, to add fuel to the fire, emerging research shows that if addictive pathways are activated during the teen years, they are there for life, and that what starts as a screen addiction can lead to major substance abuse later in life.


Dining at DuskDining at Dusk
Stevan Paul

At dusk, as afternoon relaxes into evening and the sun sinks towards the horizon, there is a magic moment. The work day is finally done, and it’s time for food and drinks with friends. Dining at Dusk follows the golden hour around the globe – from Samoa, where the sun sets first, through Australia, Japan, India, Europe, Morocco and Brazil, to the USA and Mexico – celebrating the evening with Italian cicchetti, Spanish tapas, Greek mezzes, with tacos, yakitori, ceviche and more. Simple-to-prepare recipes with roots in local culinary and cultural traditions, each paired with the ideal drink and a thoughtfully curated playlist – this is the perfect cookbook for elegant, laid-back gatherings with friends.

Dining at Dusk showcases a range of contemporary cuisine from around the world for this beautiful time of the day: relaxed, simple, comforting inspiration for food that is the ideal accompaniment to a modern lifestyle.


 

Fifty Places to Surf Before You DieFifty Places to Surf Before You Die
Chris Santella

Fifty Places to Surf Before You Die is a beautifully illustrated guide to the most thrilling surfing destinations in the world. Covering quintessential beaches, including: Oahu’s North Shore; Australia’s Gold Coast; and of course, Malibu, California, the book also invites you to discover such unexpected gems as the Amazon and the Gulf of Alaska.

From the frigid waters off Iceland’s Reykjanes Peninsula to Nazaré, Portugal, where in 2013 Garrett McNamara broke a world record for surfing the tallest wave (78 feet!), Fifty Places to Surf takes readers on a wide-roving adventure, divulging the details that make each venue unique—and plenty of tips for those who aspire to surf there. Featuring interviews with seasoned surfing experts such as pro surfer Joel Parkinson and Billabong executive Shannan North, Fifty Places to Surf Before You Die is an essential travel companion for surfers of all levels who are looking to catch that perfect wave.


 

Australian toysAustralian Toys: A Collection
Luke Jones

The book documents the production of each toy with beautiful colour photographs accompanied by relevant text about the toy and manufacturer. Luke Jones’s carefully structured collection has been assembled with passion and commitment over a period of more than thirty years and is unrivalled for its breadth and quality. It provides an ideal platform to illustrate a history of twentieth century Australian manufactured toys, a history which has yet to be substantially documented in any form.

This book will make an important contribution to the recorded history of Australian society, childhood, family and manufacturing.


Click here to see April New Releases for Kids & Teens

 

 

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