Proudly servicing the Mornington Peninsula region for more than 30 years, we are an Australian Independent Bookseller with a diverse range of titles for young and old.
143 Main St Mornington (03) 5975 5034

NOVEMBER NEW RELEASES

FICTION

Midnight LineThe Midnight Line (Jack Reacher #22)
Lee Child

Jack Reacher takes an aimless stroll past a pawn shop in a small Midwestern town. In the window he sees a West Point class ring from 2005. It’s tiny. It’s a woman cadet’s graduation present to herself. Why would she give it up? Reacher’s a West Pointer too, and he knows what she went through to get it.

Reacher tracks the ring back to its owner, step by step, down a criminal trail leading west. Like Big Foot come out of the forest, he arrives in the deserted wilds of Wyoming. All he wants is to find the woman. If she’s OK, he’ll walk away. If she’s not … he’ll stop at nothing.

He’s still shaken by the recent horrors of Make Me, and now The Midnight Line sees him set on a raw and elemental quest for simple justice. Best advice: don’t get in his way.


 

Passage of LoveThe Passage of Love
Alex Miller

Sitting in a New York park, an old man holds a book and tries to accept that his contribution to the future is over.

Instead, he remembers a youthful yearning for open horizons, for Australia, a yearning he now knows inspired his life as a writer. Instinctively he picks up his pen and starts at the beginning…

At twenty-one years, Robert Crofts leaves his broken dreams in Far North Queensland, finally stopping in Melbourne almost destitute. It’s there he begins to understand how books and writing might be the saving of him. They will be how he leaves his mark on the world. He also begins to understand how many obstacles there will be to thwart his ambition.

When Robert is introduced to Lena Soren, beautiful, rich and educated, his life takes a very different path. But in the intimacy of their connection lies an unknowability that both torments and tantalises as Robert and Lena long for something that neither can provide for the other.

In a rich blend of thoughtful and beautifully observed writing, the lives of a husband and wife are laid bare in their passionate struggle to engage with their individual creativity.


Set Me FreeSet Me Free: The Story of How Shakespeare Saved A Life
Salvatore Striano

Sasà grew up in Naples. He never went to school, and instead grew up with street violence and bloodshed, becoming the leader of a gang of boys mixed up with the Camorra by the age of fourteen. At the age of thirty, he was in prison, his life all but mapped out.

That’s when Shakespeare steps in. At Sasà’s most hopeless point, he is persuaded to join the prison’s drama troupe. In Shakespeare’s Tempest, Sasà stumbles on what he needs to explain the world which has defined his own life.

Set Me Free: The Story of How Shakespeare Saved A Life is a story about betrayal, forgiveness and, above all, the transformative power of reading.


 

In the Midst of WinterIn The Midst of Winter
Isabel Allende

Amid the biggest Brooklyn snowstorm in living memory, an unexpected friendship blossoms between three people thrown together by circumstance. Richard Bowmaster, a lonely university professor in his sixties, hits the car driven by Evelyn Ortega, a young, undocumented migrant from Guatemala. But what at first seems an inconvenience takes an unforeseen and darker turn when Evelyn comes to him and his neighbour Lucia Maraz, desperately seeking help. Sweeping from present-day Brooklyn to Guatemala to turbulent 1970s Chile and Brazil, and woven with Isabel Allende’s trademark humanity, passion and storytelling verve, In the Midst of Winter is a mesmerizing and unforgettable tale.


 

Two Kinds of TruthTwo Kinds of Truth (A Harry Bosch novel)
Michael Connolly

Harry Bosch is back as a volunteer working cold cases for the San Fernando Police Department and is called out to a local drug store where a young pharmacist has been murdered. Bosch and the town’s 3-person detective squad sift through the clues, which lead into the dangerous, big business world of pill mills and prescription drug abuse.

Meanwhile, an old case from Bosch’s LAPD days comes back to haunt him when a long-imprisoned killer claims Harry framed him, and seems to have new evidence to prove it. Bosch left the LAPD on bad terms, so his former colleagues aren’t keen to protect his reputation. He must fend for himself in clearing his name and keeping a clever killer in prison.

The two unrelated cases wind around each other like strands of barbed wire. Along the way Bosch discovers that there are two kinds of truth: the kind that sets you free and the kind that leaves you buried in darkness.


 

Under the Cold Bright LightsUnder the Cold Bright Lights
Garry Disher

The young detectives call Alan Auhl a retread, but that doesn’t faze him. He does things his own way—and gets results.

He still lives with his ex-wife, off and on, in a big house full of random boarders and hard-luck stories. And he’s still a cop, even though he retired from Homicide some years ago.

He works cold cases now. Like the death of John Elphick—his daughters still convinced he was murdered, the coroner not so sure. Or the skeleton that’s just been found under a concrete slab. Or the doctor who killed two wives and a girlfriend, and left no evidence at all.

Auhl will stick with these cases until justice is done. One way or another.


 

Long Way From HomeA Long Way From Home
Peter Carey

Irene Bobs loves fast driving. Her husband is the best car salesman in western Victoria. Together they enter the Redex Trial, a brutal race around the ancient continent over roads no car will ever quite survive.

With them is their lanky fair-haired navigator, Willie Bachhuber, a quiz show champion and failed schoolteacher whose job it is to call out the turns, the grids, the creek crossings on a map that will finally remove them, without warning, from the lily-white Australia they know so well.

This thrilling, high-speed story starts in one way and then takes you someplace else. It is often funny, the more so as the world gets stranger, and always a page-turner, even as you learn a history these characters never knew themselves. Set in the 1950s amid the consequences of the age of empires, this brilliantly vivid and lively novel reminds us how Europeans took possession of a timeless culture – the high purpose they invented and the crimes they committed along the way.


 

SanctuarySanctuary
Judy Nunn

On a barren island off the coast of Western Australia, a rickety wooden dinghy runs aground. Aboard are nine people who have no idea where they are. Strangers before the violent storm that tore their vessel apart, the instinct to survive has seen them bond during their days adrift on a vast and merciless ocean.

Fate has cast them ashore with only one thing in common . . . fear. Rassen the doctor, Massoud the student, the child Hamid and the others all fear for their lives. But in their midst is Jalila, who appears to fear nothing. The beautiful young Yazidi woman is a mystery to them all.

While they remain undiscovered on the deserted island, they dare to dream of a new life . . .

But forty kilometres away on the mainland lies the tiny fishing port of Shoalhaven. Here everyone knows everyone, and everyone has their place. In Shoalhaven things never change.

Until now . . .


 

Uncommon TypeUncommon Type
Tom Hanks

A hectic, funny sexual affair between two best friends. A World War II veteran dealing with his emotional and physical scars. A second-rate actor plunged into sudden stardom and a whirlwind press junket. A small-town newspaper columnist with old-fashioned views of the modern world. A woman adjusting to life in a new neighborhood after her divorce. Four friends going to the moon and back in a rocket ship constructed in the backyard. A teenage surfer stumbling into his father’s secret life.

These are just some of the people and situations that Tom Hanks explores in his first work of fiction, a collection of 17 stories that dissects, with great affection, humour, and insight, the human condition and all its foibles. The stories are linked by one thing: in each of them, a typewriter plays a part, sometimes minor, sometimes central. To many, typewriters represent a level of craftsmanship, beauty and individuality that is harder and harder to find in the modern world. In his stories, Hanks gracefully reaches that typewriter-worthy level.

Known for his honesty and sensitivity as an actor, Hanks brings both those characteristics to his writing. Alternatingly whimsical, moving and occasionally melancholy, Uncommon Type is a book that will delight as well as surprise his millions of fans. It also establishes him as a welcome and wonderful new voice in contemporary fiction, a voice that perceptively delves beneath the surface of friendships, families, love and normal, everyday behaviour.


 

NON FICTION

Burke and WillsBurke and Wills
Peter Fitzsimons

‘They have left here today!’ he calls to the others. When King puts his hand down above the ashes of the fire, it is to find it still hot. There is even a tiny flame flickering from the end of one log. They must have left just hours ago.

MELBOURNE, 20 AUGUST 1860. In an ambitious quest to be the first Europeans to cross the harsh Australian continent, the Victorian Exploring Expedition sets off, farewelled by 15,000 cheering well-wishers. Led by Robert O’Hara Burke, a brave man totally lacking in the bush skills necessary for his task; surveyor and meteorologist William Wills; and 17 others, the expedition took 20 tons of equipment carried on six wagons, 23 horses and 26 camels.

Almost immediately plagued by disputes and sackings, the expeditioners battled the extremes of the Australian landscape and weather: its deserts, the boggy mangrove swamps of the Gulf, the searing heat and flooding rains. Food ran short and, unable to live off the land, the men nevertheless mostly spurned the offers of help from the local Indigenous people.

In desperation, leaving the rest of the party at the expedition’s depot on Coopers Creek, Burke, Wills, Charley Gray and John King made a dash for the Gulf in December 1860. Bad luck and bad management would see them miss by just hours a rendezvous back at Coopers Creek, leaving them stranded in the wilderness with practically no supplies. Only King survived to tell the tale.

Yet, despite their tragic fates, the names of Burke and Wills have become synonymous with perseverance and bravery in the face of overwhelming odds. They live on in our nation’s history – and their story remains immediate and compelling.


 

 

Caroline ChisholmCaroline Chisholm: An Irresistible Force
Sarah Goldman

Caroline Chisholm was a take-no-prisoners game-changer of colonial Australia – as well as a charming, wholly committed, and utterly determined force of nature. Arriving in Australia in 1838, she was appalled by the plight of young female immigrants in Australia – there were no jobs for them, no accommodation, and many of them resorted to prostitution to survive. In response to this need, Caroline became a woman on a mission. She met every immigrant ship and became a familiar figure on the wharves, finding positions for immigrant girls and sheltering many of them in her home. As the government of the day refused to help, Chisholm established accommodation, services and the first employment office in the colony, drawing up the first ever employment contracts in Australia. She established minimum wages, found jobs and homes, created employment agencies in a dozen rural centres as well, and she managed to do all this without any assistance from the government of the time. In many ways a proto-feminist and committed social activist, she utterly transformed life in Australia.

A long overdue, contemporary and lively reassessment of Caroline, which brings to life her spirited character, her modern relevance, her feminist credentials and her egalitarian spirit.


 

Things that make usThe Things That Make Us
Nick Riewoldt

From No. 1 pick in the 2000 AFL draft, to six-time winner of St Kilda’s best and fairest award, to five-time All Australian, to captaining his club for a record 220 games, to more than 330 games as a star of the AFL, Nick Riewoldt is an out-and-out champion.

The Things that Make Us is Nick’s autobiography, written with a deep intelligence and insight, and giving a fascinating perspective on his extraordinary life and career. As Nick describes it:

‘I hope there’s something in these pages for everyone who’s known grief, especially anyone who’s lost a sibling. I hope, too, that my story brings a deeper understanding of a footballer’s crazy world. An insight into what goes into making it, what it takes to stay there, and the crippling anxiety that can consume you when your burden is to accept only the best. I hope it paints a picture of what it’s like to be the focus of acclamation and scandal, the good and bad of a searing spotlight, and how these experiences can bring out the best and worst in us.

‘I hope it honours my family – the German and Tasmanian sides with their stories of struggle and endurance – who are the essence of the book’s title. I hope it gives thanks for the love I found on the other side of the world, and the beautiful next generation Cath and I are building together.

‘I hope above all that it honours my sister Maddie.

‘These are the things that made me.’

The Things That Make Us is the intimate, powerful and revealing account of the life of an AFL superstar, and a classic in the making.


 

River of ConsciousnessThe River of Consciousness
Oliver Sacks

In his previous books, Oliver Sacks had addressed questions of the brain and mind through the lens of case histories of individuals with neurological disorders. Recently, however, he had been reflecting on his experiences with such patients in the context of a lifetime of medical practice, and in light of recent neuroscientific evidence and theories. The River of Consciousness will be a broader and more direct look at how the brain and mind work, as always, incorporating Sacks’ rich historical and personal context.

Advances in neuroscience have revolutionized our ability to visualize the brain in action. For the first time we are able to close the gap between the philosophical questions which have consumed the world’s thinkers since the eighteenth century and the true physiological basis of perception and consciousness. In The River of Consciousness, Sacks will examine questions of memory, time, and consciousness. How do we think, how do we remember? Do different individuals have different speeds or ways of thinking? Is memory reliable? How do the neural correlates of memory differ for true memories and false memories? How do we construct our sense of time, our visual world? What is consciousness, neurologically speaking? And most importantly, what is creativity?

Sacks completed the research for this book before he died, and with instructions on how it was to be put together. This is a remarkable culmination of a lifetime’s research into the way the brain works.


 

Leonardo Da VinciLeondardo da Vinci
Walter Isaacson

He was history’s most creative genius. What secrets can he teach us?

The author of the acclaimed bestsellers Steve JobsEinstein, and Benjamin Franklin brings Leonardo da Vinci to life in this exciting new biography.

Based on thousands of pages from Leonardo’s astonishing notebooks and new discoveries about his life and work, Walter Isaacson weaves a narrative that connects his art to his science. He shows how Leonardo’s genius was based on skills we can improve in ourselves, such as passionate curiosity, careful observation, and an imagination so playful that it flirted with fantasy.

He produced the two most famous paintings in history, The Last Supper and the Mona Lisa. But in his own mind, he was just as much a man of science and technology. With a passion that sometimes became obsessive, he pursued innovative studies of anatomy, fossils, birds, the heart, flying machines, botany, geology, and weaponry. His ability to stand at the crossroads of the humanities and the sciences, made iconic by his drawing of Vitruvian Man, made him history’s most creative genius.

His creativity, like that of other great innovators, came from having wide-ranging passions. He peeled flesh off the faces of cadavers, drew the muscles that move the lips, and then painted history’s most memorable smile. He explored the math of optics, showed how light rays strike the cornea, and produced illusions of changing perspectives in The Last Supper. Isaacson also describes how Leonardo’s lifelong enthusiasm for staging theatrical productions informed his paintings and inventions.

Leonardo’s delight at combining diverse passions remains the ultimate recipe for creativity. So, too, does his ease at being a bit of a misfit: illegitimate, gay, vegetarian, left-handed, easily distracted, and at times heretical. His life should remind us of the importance of instilling, both in ourselves and our children, not just received knowledge but a willingness to question it–to be imaginative and, like talented misfits and rebels in any era, to think different.


 

Basics to Brilliance KidsBasics to Brilliance: Kids
Donna Hay

Basics to Brilliance Kids is the latest gorgeous new book from Australia’s bestselling cookbook author, Donna Hay, to accompany her new TV series of the same name which will show on Foxtel in October 2017. As a mum, Donna knows that there is nothing more enjoyable than introducing your children to the wonders of taste, food and flavours. Her new book highlights the importance of mastering the basics, celebrates fresh, healthy food, and the joy of cooking, eating and sharing delicious food with the people we love. Featuring over 120 fantastic, fun-filled, simple, family-friendly recipes, Basics to Brilliance Kids gives you and your kids endless ideas for birthday parties, picnics, school fairs and bake sales, family and celebration dinners, brilliant breakfasts, beach days, backyard movie nights and sleepovers.


 

OverheardOverheard: The Art of Eavesdropping
Oslo Davis

Cartoonist Oslo Davis listens in to real people saying real things – and it’s hilarious.

Every week since 2007, Oslo Davis has been eavesdropping on people in the city of Melbourne, Australia, and recording what he hears in a cartoon for The Age newspaper. His wry observations have earned him a cult following, and ten years on he has become a beloved fixture.

Now, for the first time, his Overheard cartoons have been collected in a hilarious compilation, with chapters covering Family Matters, Modern Life, Relationships, The Daily Grind, Friends Like These and What The. Transported through the city by Oslo’s nimble pen, we listen in to the daughter telling her mother not to interfere in party preparations, the fat man pondering what is least bad to eat, and the hipster commenting on what is truly hip.

Overheard is a hysterical collection with universal appeal.


 

Karl, the universe and everythingKarl, the Universe and Everything
Dr Karl Kruszelnicki

Grab your towel and hitchhike across the galaxy with Australia’s most popular scientist Dr Karl Kruszelnicki. Learn about Dr Karl, the universe and everything, and discover how air-conditioning is sexist, how you can kill a spinning hard drive by shouting at it and how space junk is threatening our future capabilities for space travel.

Could there be life on one of Saturn’s moons? How much power could you collect from all the lightning on Earth? Why do books have book-smell? Why is 10 per cent of the Earth’s land area prone to sinkholes?

Why are some people chronically late? What would happen if the Earth stopped spinning? Why do most people hardly remember anything from the first half-a-dozen years of their life?

How close are we to the Artificial Uterus? Why do some songs turn into “earworms” and stick inside your brain? Why does your hotel room access card get wiped so easily?

And is your home WiFi really spying on you?


 

Ducks for dark timesDucks for Dark Times
Michael Leunig

A collection of cartoons about many strange and lovely things: kind words for dark days; simple poems concerning wonderful mysteries; reflections on sadness, joy, dismay, sanity, soup and beauty. Also: doubts, confessions, laments and tributes. Spirited depictions of dogs, ducks, teapots and trees, with various peculiar attempts to shine some light on dark and troubled times.


 

KIDS

Magic MisfitsThe Magic Misfits
Neil Patrick Harris

This book contains a BIG SECRET. Read on if you dare …

Do you believe in magic?

Carter doesn’t. He knows magic tricks are just that – tricks. And as a street magician he’s also pretty good at them. But then Carter runs away from his conman uncle and he finds himself alone and in danger from dastardly carnival ringleader, B.B. Bosso. He could really use some magic now …

A chance encounter with the mysterious Mr Dante Vernon leads Carter to a magic shop, where he teams up with five other like-minded kids and the Magic Misfits are born! Can the gang use their magical talents to save the day and stop B.B. stealing a priceless diamond?

And now for the BIG SECRET … inside this book you will find a treasure trove of tips, codes and stage tricks that will help YOU join the Magic Misfits and make some magic of your own. (BUT DON’T TELL ANYONE.)

Perfect for children aged 8 to 12 years old and fans of Lemony Snicket, David Walliams … and magic!


 

Here we areHere We Are
Oliver Jeffers

Well, hello.
And welcome to this Planet.
We call it Earth.

Our world can be a bewildering place, especially if you’ve only just got here. Your head will be filled with questions, so let’s explore what makes our planet and how we live on it. From land and sky, to people and time, these notes can be your guide and start you on your journey. And you’ll figure lots of things out for yourself. Just remember to leave notes for everyone else… Some things about our planet are pretty complicated, but things can be simple, too: you’ve just got to be kind.

Here We Are is the utterly heartfelt new book from Oliver Jeffers. We’re glad you found it.


 

Very Noisy BabyThe Very Noisy Baby
Alison Lester

Here is the story of a very noisy baby.

She could bellow like a buffalo
And roar like a lion
And howl like a wolf for a very long time.

The baby loves to make all kinds of sounds. She’s really very loud.
But when some animals in the town go missing, can the very noisy baby help?

Find out in this wonderfully boisterous story, full of action, fun (and noise!).


 

Coming HomeComing Home
Michael Morpurgo

A beautifully-written, lyrical and heart-warming Christmas story with stunning, child-friendly illustrations.

Ideal for sharing with friends and family–young and old–during the festive season.


 

Dog with Nice EarsA Dog With Nice Ears (A Charlie and Lola story)
Lauren Child

Lola wants a dog – but the qualities of her perfect pooch seem oddly like those of a … rabbit!

Silly, surprising, thoughtful and fun, Charlie and Lola are on top form in this fantastically funny story, packed full of dogs of every shape, size and colour. Lauren Child’s endlessly endearing characters and inimitable humour will be a sure-fire hit with existing and new fans – this is the perfect tale for anyone who has ever imagined what having the perfect pet would be like.

A new Charlie and Lola story is the gold standard in picture books – the perfect read-aloud that both children and parents will love.


 

Tales from a Tall ForestTales from a Tall Forest
Shaun Micallef

Once upon a time being, forever and ever ago, there lived a forest tall of tales…
?

When an innocent princess wanders into the forest, she finds herself trapped between a wolf with a ravenous appetite and a sweet little house with a secret. Meanwhile, a desperate fisherman enters into a very bad bargain with a power-hungry monkey. And meanerwhile still, a tiny tricksy tailor promises a promise that not even the most magic of beanstalks can help him escape.

In this rich and rambunctious tapestry of tales, satirist Shaun Micallef unravels the traditional fairy story and nimbly weaves your favourite characters into new and surprising adventures. Illustrated by award-winning artist Jonathan Bentley, this subversively silly trilogy will captivate parents and children alike – and indignant fairytale authors too.


 

Bad DadBad Dad
David Walliams

Dads come in all sorts of shapes and sizes.

There are fat ones and thin ones, tall ones and short ones.
There are young ones and old ones, clever ones and stupid ones.
There are silly ones and serious ones, loud ones and quiet ones.
Of course, there are good dads, and bad dads . . .

A high-speed cops and robbers adventure with heart and soul about a father and son taking on the villainous Mr Big – and winning!

This riches-to-rags story will have you on the edge of your seat and howling with laughter!

Bad Dad is a fast and furious, heart-warming story of a father and son on an adventure – and a thrilling mission to break an innocent man into prison!


 

Diary Wimpy Kid GetawayThe Getaway (Diary of a Wimpy Kid #12)
Jeff Kinney

Greg Heffley and his family are getting out of town. With the cold weather and the stress of the approaching holiday season, the Heffleys decide to escape to a tropical island resort for some much needed rest and relaxation. A few days in paradise should do wonders for Greg and his frazzled family. But the Heffleys soon discover that paradise isn’t everything it’s cracked up to be. Sunburn, stomach troubles, and venomous critters all threaten to ruin the family’s vacation. Can their trip be saved, or will this island getaway end in disaster?


 

Tom Gates Epic AdventureEpic Adventure (kind of) (Tom Gates #13)
Liz Pichon

Having two sets of grandparents is turning out to be very good for me. The Wrinklies are keen on giving presents AND they’re planning a family outing which is going to be EPIC! Even Delia wants to come. (I can always ignore her.)

The next instalment of the hilarious and best-selling Tom Gates series.

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