MAY NEW RELEASES

FICTION

The Things She Owned
Katherine Tamiko Arguile

Years after the death of her cruel and complicated mother, Erika’s house is still full of the things Michiko left behind: an onigiri basket, a Wedgwood tea set, a knotted ring from Okinawa. In defiance of Japanese tradition, Erika has also kept the urn containing Michiko’s ashes, refusing to put her memory to rest. Erika throws herself into working as a chef at a high-end London restaurant and pretends everything is fine. But when a cousin announces that she will be visiting from Japan, Erika’s resolve begins to crack.

Slowly the things Michiko owned reveal stories of Michiko’s youth amid the upheaval of Tokyo during and after the war. As the two women’s stories progress and entwine, Erika is drawn to the island of Okinawa, the homeland of her grandmother. It’s a place of magic and mysticism where the secrets of Erika’s own past are waiting to be revealed.

Beautiful and mysterious, The Things She Owned explores the complexity of lives lived between cultures, the weight of crossgenerational trauma, and a mother and daughter on a tortuous path to forgiveness.


In the Time of Foxes
Jo Lennan

A fox could be a shape-shifter, a spirit being. It could appear in human form if this suited its purposes; it could come and go as it pleased, play tricks, lead men astray.’

A film director in Hackney with a fox problem in her garden; an escapee from a cult in Japan; a Sydney café-owner rekindling an old flame; an English tutor who gets too close to an oligarch; a journalist on Mars, face-to-face with his fate.

The world has taught these men and women to live off their wits. They know how to play smart, but what happens when they need to be wise?

In the Time of Foxes is both compellingly readable and deeply insightful about the times in which we live, each narrative a compressed novel. With an exhilarating span of people and places, woven together by the most mercurial of animals, it shows the short story collection at its most entertaining and rewarding, and introduces Jo Lennan as a captivating new storyteller.


The Drop-off
Fiona Harris & Mike McLeish

Lizzie, Megan and Sam became accidental friends over good coffee, banter and wrong-world jokes at school drop off. Lizzie is a part-time midwife with four kids and a secret past. Sam is an ex-chef and stay-at-home dad with an absent, high-flying corporate wife. Megan is an ex-model single mum with a thriving online business and no time for loneliness.

None of them have much interest in their school community, but when tragedy deals Baytree Primary’s reputation a potentially crippling blow, this unlikely trio have to step up. Forced out of their respective comfort zones, Lizzie, Megan and Sam learn more about each other, the school and themselves than they thought possible.

And it all begins at The Drop-off.


Find Them Dead
Peter James

A Brighton gangster is on trial for conspiracy to murder, following the death of a rival crime family boss. As the jury file into Lewes Crown Court, twelve anonymous people selected randomly from fifty, there is one person sitting in the public gallery observing them with keen interest, and secretly filming them. Later, a group of the accused’s henchmen sit around a table with the full personal details of each of the twelve jurors in front of them. They need to influence two of them – a jury can convict if directed on a 10-2 majority verdict but no less. But which two?

When Roy Grace is called in to investigate a murder that has links to the accused and the trial, and the suspicion that an attempt has been made to intimidate jurors, he finds the reach and power of the accused’s tentacles go higher than he had ever imagined.


Love
Roddy Doyle

One summer’s evening, two men meet up in a Dublin restaurant.

Old friends, now married and with grown-up children, their lives have taken seemingly similar paths. But Joe has a secret he has to tell Davy, and Davy, a grief he wants to keep from Joe. Both are not the men they used to be.

Neither Davy nor Joe know what the night has in store, but as two pints turns to three, then five, and the men set out to revisit the haunts of their youth, the ghosts of Dublin entwine around them. Their first buoyant forays into adulthood, the pubs, the parties, broken hearts and bungled affairs, as well as the memories of what eventually drove them apart.

As the two friends try to reconcile their versions of the past over the course of one night, Love offers up a delightfully comic, yet moving portrait of what love, in its many forms, can take throughout our lives.


The Discomfort of Evening
Marieke Lucas Rijneveld

I asked God if he please couldn’t take my brother Matthies instead of my rabbit. ‘Amen.’

Ten-year-old Jas has a unique way of experiencing her universe: the feeling of udder ointment on her skin as protection against harsh winters; the texture of green warts, like capers, on migrating toads; the sound of ‘blush words’ that aren’t in the Bible. But when a tragic accident ruptures the family, her curiosity warps into a vortex of increasingly disturbing fantasies – unlocking a darkness that threatens to derail them all.

A bestselling sensation in the Netherlands, Marieke Lucas Rijneveld’s radical debut novel is studded with images of wild, violent beauty: a world of language unlike any other.


Goldilocks
Laura Lam

Despite increasing restrictions on the freedoms of women on Earth, Valerie Black is spearheading the first all-female mission to a planet in the Goldilocks Zone, where conditions are just right for human habitation.

It’s humanity’s last hope for survival, and Naomi, Valerie’s surrogate daughter and the ship’s botanist, has been waiting her whole life for an opportunity like this – to step out of Valerie’s shadow and really make a difference.

But when things start going wrong on the ship, Naomi starts to suspect that someone on board is concealing a terrible secret – and realises time for life on Earth may be running out faster than they feared . . .


Fair Warning
Michael Connolly

Veteran reporter Jack McEvoy has taken down killers before, but when a woman he had a one-night stand with is murdered in a particularly brutal way, McEvoy realizes he might be facing a criminal mind unlike any he’s ever encountered.

McEvoy investigates–against the warnings of the police and his own editor–and makes a shocking discovery that connects the crime to other mysterious deaths across the country. But his inquiry hits a snag when he himself becomes a suspect.

As he races to clear his name, McEvoy’s findings point to a serial killer working under the radar of law enforcement for years, and using personal data shared by the victims themselves to select and hunt his targets.

Called ‘the Raymond Chandler of this generation’ (Associated Press), Michael Connelly once again delivers an unputdownable thriller that reveals a predator operating from the darkest corners of human nature-and one man courageous and determined enough to stand in his way.


Three Apples Fell from the Sky
Narine Abgaryan

In a remote village high in the Armenian mountains, a close-knit community bickers, gossips and laughs. Their only connection with the outside world is an ancient telegraph wire and a perilous mountain road that even cows struggle to navigate. As they go about their daily lives – harvesting crops, making baklava, tidying their houses – the villagers are sustained by one thing: their belief in magic. But when 58-year old Anatolia becomes pregnant, it looks like the fortunes of this isolated village are about to change…

With sumptuous imagery and warm humour, Narine Abgaryan’s enchanting fable brilliantly captures the idiosyncrasy of a small community. Three Apples Fell from the Sky is a vibrant tale of resilience, bravery and the rejuvenating power of love, available in English for the first time.


Night Lessons in Little Jerusalem
Rick Held

The hero of this book was not a saint, nor even a tzadik – the nearest Jewish equivalent – but he was a hero. Someone who risked his own life to make a difference to the life of another. Were his motives selfless? No. He was after all flesh and blood. A man. And a very young one. But life is not black and white. Heroes are not without their flaws. This is his story.

Tholdi is a romantic. A musical prodigy whose brilliant future is extinguished when the horror unfolding across Europe arrives at his door. One day he’s captivated by the beautiful, mysterious Lyuba who he meets on his sixteenth birthday; the next he wakes to the terrors of war as the Nazi-allied Romanians attack his town of Czernowitz.

A ghetto is built to imprison the town’s Jews before herding them onto trains bound for the concentration camps of Transnistria. With each passing day, Tholdi and his parents await their turn. And then Fate intervenes, giving them all a reprieve.

At the weaving mill Tholdi secures work that spares him. He is elated. Until he discovers the two brothers who run the mill are Nazi collaborators hiding a terrible secret: the threat of transportation remains. When Tholdi sees one of the brothers with Lyuba, he glimpses a way to save himself and his family. But the stakes of his gamble are high. Will Lyuba be the key to their survival, or will Tholdi’s infatuation with her become a dangerous obsession that guarantees their death?

Night Lessons in Little Jerusalem is an unforgettable debut novel of war, family and love.


If It Bleeds
Stephen King

News people have a saying: ‘If it bleeds, it leads’. And a bomb at Albert Macready Middle School is guaranteed to lead any bulletin.

Holly Gibney of the Finders Keepers detective agency is working on the case of a missing dog – and on her own need to be more assertive – when she sees the footage on TV. But when she tunes in again, to the late-night report, she realises there is something not quite right about the correspondent who was first on the scene.

So begins ‘If It Bleeds’, a stand-alone sequel to the No. 1 bestselling The Outsider featuring the incomparable Holly on her first solo case – and also the riveting title story in Stephen King’s brilliant new collection of four uniquely wonderful long stories.


Katheryn Howard, the Tainted Queen (Tudor Queens #5)
Alison Weir

A naive young woman at the mercy of her ambitious family.

At just nineteen, Katheryn Howard is quick to trust and fall in love.

She comes to court. She sings, she dances. She captures the heart of the King.

Henry declares she is his rose without a thorn. But Katheryn has a past of which he knows nothing. It comes back increasingly to haunt her. For those who share her secrets are waiting in the shadows, whispering words of love… and blackmail.

Katheryn Howard
The fifth of Henry’s queens.
Her story.

Acclaimed, bestselling historian Alison Weir draws on extensive research to recount one of the most tragic tales in English history – that of a lively, sweet but neglected girl, used by powerful men for their own gain.


Sea Wife
Amity Gaige

Juliet is failing to juggle motherhood and her anemic dissertation when her husband, Michael, informs her that he wants to leave his job and buy a sailboat. The couple are novice sailors, but Michael persuades Juliet to say yes. With their two kids – Sybil, age seven, and George, age two, Juliet and Michael set off for Panama, where their forty-four-foot sailboat awaits them – a boat that Michael has christened the Juliet.

The initial result is transformative: their marriage is given a gust of energy, and even the children are affected by the beauty and wonderful vertigo of travel. The sea challenges them all – and most of all, Juliet, who suffers from postpartum depression.

Sea Wife is told in gripping dual perspectives: Juliet’s first-person narration, after the journey, as she struggles to come to terms with the dire, life-changing events that unfolded at sea; and Michael’s captain’s log – that provides a riveting, slow-motion account of those same inexorable events.

Exuberant, harrowing, witty, and exquisitely written, Sea Wife is impossible to put down.


Dear Child
Romy Hausmann

A windowless shack in the woods. Lena’s life and that of her two children follows the rules set by their captor, the father: Meals, bathroom visits, study time are strictly scheduled and meticulously observed. He protects his family from the dangers lurking in the outside world and makes sure that his children will always have a mother to look after them.

One day Lena manages to flee – but the nightmare continues. It seems as if her tormentor wants to get back what belongs to him. And then there is the question whether she really is the woman called ‘Lena’, who disappeared without a trace 14 years ago. The police and Lena’s family are all desperately trying to piece together a puzzle which doesn’t quite seem to fit.


Like a House on Fire
Caroline Hulse

Things Stella and George have had blazing rows about:

– Misquoting Jurassic Park.
– Leaving a Coke can on the side of the bath.
– Fitting car seats for their hypothetical kids.

In other news, they’re getting divorced.

But first, Stella’s mum is throwing a murder mystery party and – with her dad losing his job, her mum’s recent diagnosis, and some very odd behaviour from her sister – now is not the time to tell everyone. All Stella and George have to do is make it through the day without their break-up being discovered – though it will soon turn out that having secrets runs in the family…


Catherine House
Elisabeth Thomas

That was the Catherine experiment: give the house three years – three profound, total years – then become anything or anyone you want to be. Watch all your dreams come true

Catherine House is an American college with a difference. Only the most brilliant minds enter, and its graduates earn prestige, wealth and honour. But over the three years they attend the school, they remain within its black gates; they have no contact with their loved ones; no association with the outside world. Those who break these rules will find themselves facing time in the school’s infamous tower.

Ines enters Catherine House on the run from an incredibly dark secret, and welcomes the school’s isolation. Sharing a room with the sweet, damaged Baby, she slowly begins to build the group of friends she never had outside its walls. One day, however, Baby is summoned to the tower – and never returns. Ines is heartbroken, left to uncover the secrets that Catherine House conceals while slowly becoming more and more seduced herself by its dark, magetic power.

Swirling with atmosphere and the subtle tingling of horror, Catherine House is a novel that will steal your heart and swallow you whole.


The Lizard
Dugald Bruce-Lockhart

Obsessed with his ex-girlfriend, Alistair Haston heads off to Greece, where she is on holiday, to try and rekindle their relationship. On the ferry from Athens he is offered a lucrative job, recruiting tourists to pose for and, he later discovers, to sleep with, Heinrich a wealthy and charismatic, German artist.

Swept away on a tide of wild parties, wild sex, fine food and drugs Haston sheds his reserve and throws himself headlong into the pursuit of pleasure. Until, a body is found and the finger of blame points to Haston. His world collapses. Arrested but allowed to escape, the body count piles up and Halston finds himself on the run by land and sea on a journey more breathtaking and more frightening than his wildest dreams.


HRT Husband Replacement Therapy
Kathy Lette

What do you do when you’re told you’ve got terminal cancer at 50? Take up crochet, get religion and bow out gracefully? Or upend your life and spend every remaining minute exploring new pleasures?

Ruby has always been the generous mediator among her friends, family and colleagues, which is why they have all turned up to celebrate her 50th birthday. But after a few too many glasses of champers, Ruby’s speech doesn’t exactly go to plan. Instead of delivering the witty and warm words her guests are expecting, Ruby takes her moment in the spotlight to reveal what she really thinks of every one of them. She also accuses her husband, Harry, of having an affair.

Saving the best till last, Ruby lambasts her octogenarian mother for a lifetime of playing her three daughters against each other. It’s blisteringly brutal. As the stunned gathering gawks at Ruby, the birthday girl concludes her bravura monologue with the throwaway comment that she has terminal cancer. She has cashed in her life savings and plans on taking her two sisters cruising into the sunset for a dose of Husband Replacement Therapy. Courageous? Or ruthlessly selfish?

But, do they even want to go with her now that she’s cast herself off into social Siberia?


If I Had Your Face
Frances Cha

‘I would live your life so much better than you if I had your face . . . ‘

If I Had Your Face plunges us into the mesmerizing world of contemporary Seoul – a place where extreme plastic surgery is as routine as getting a haircut, where women compete for spots in secret ‘room salons’ to entertain wealthy businessmen after hours, where K-Pop stars are the object of all-consuming obsession, and ruthless social hierarchies dictate your every move.

Navigating this cut-throat city are four young women balancing on the razor-edge of survival: Kyuri, an exquisitely beautiful woman whose hard-won status at an exclusive ‘room salon’ is threatened by an impulsive mistake with a client; her flatmate Miho, an orphan who wins a scholarship to a prestigious art school in New York, where her life becomes tragically enmeshed with the super-wealthy offspring of the Korean elite; Wonna, their neighbour, pregnant with a child that she and her husband have no idea how they will afford to raise in a fiercely competitive economy; and Ara, a hair stylist living down the hall, whose infatuation with a fresh-faced K-Pop star drives her to violent extremes.


Blue Ticket
Sophie Mackintosh

Calla knows how the lottery works. Everyone does. On the day of your first bleed, you report to the station to learn what kind of woman you will be. A white ticket grants you children. A blue ticket grants you freedom. You are relieved of the terrible burden of choice. And, once you’ve taken your ticket, there is no going back.

But what if the life you’re given is the wrong one?

Blue Ticket is a devastating enquiry into free will and the fraught space of motherhood. Bold and chilling, it pushes beneath the skin of female identity and patriarchal violence, to the point where human longing meets our animal bodies.


NON-FICTION

Untethered
Hayley Katzen

When urban academic Hayley Katzen moves to a remote Australian cattle property to live with her farmer girlfriend, she hopes, at last, to find home.

But this is no happy-ever-after tree change. Lecture halls, law reform and the arts are replaced with castrating calves, shovelling manure, fire-fighting and anti-gas blockades. In a place that attracts people who live by their own rules, Hayley must confront her limitations and preconceptions to forge her own identity.

Set in the unpredictable beauty of the Australian landscape, and told with Hayley Katzen’s compelling candour and rigour, Untethered charts one migrant’s search for home. Part love story and part off-the-grid adventure, Untethered is a powerful reminder that home can be found in many forms – in love, in family and friends, in ideologies and political movements, in landscapes and communities, and ultimately, in ourselves.


Wild Interiors 
Hilton Carter

Bestselling author Hilton Carter brings his unique eye and love of plants to show you how to create luscious interiors that not only look amazing but are good for your well-being, too.

Hilton first guides you through his own plant journey, his inspirations, and his top ten favorite house plants. He then takes you on a Journey in Greenery where he showcases the homes of 12 inspiring plant parents that demonstrate the versatility of decorating with plants. From a tiny house in Venice, California and a light-filled loft in New York City, to a Berlin apartment decorated with vintage finds, and the Barcelona home of a ceramic artist, there are ideas for all types of spaces and budgets. Hilton then sets you off on your very own plant journey, taking you room by room, profiling the plants that are most suited to each: those that thrive in the tropical humidity of bathrooms, the erratic heat changes of kitchens, and plants that can live happily in the indirect light of an entryway or bedroom.

Packed full of interior design advice such as using &;statement plants like Fiddle-leaf figs to create a focal point, how to layer your greenery by using hanging baskets, and how to assemble the perfect plant shelf, Hilton shows you how bringing houseplants into your home creates instant impact. Be inspired to create your own Wild Interiors with Hilton’s expert styling advice, plus his hints and tips on plant care that take the mystery out of looking after your green friends.


Yes to Life In Spite of Everything
Viktor Frankl

Just months after his liberation from Auschwitz renowned psychiatrist Viktor E. Frankl delivered a series of talks revealing the foundations of his life-affirming philosophy. The psychologist, who would soon become world famous, explained his central thoughts on meaning, resilience and his conviction that every crisis contains opportunity.

Published here for the very first time in English, Frankl’s words resonate as strongly today as they did in 1946. Despite the unspeakable horrors in the camp, Frankl learnt from his fellow inmates that it is always possible to say ‘yes to life’ – a profound and timeless lesson for us all.

With an introduction by Daniel Goleman.


Nonna Knows Best
Jaclyn Crupi

In Nonna Knows Best, Jaclyn Crupi celebrates the passion, generosity of spirit and good old- fashioned wisdom of nonnas and shares the secrets that make them so special, including mouth-watering recipes from la cucina della nonna (nonna’s kitchen), foolproof tips, sayings and advice for every life moment.

Charming, entertaining and insightful, Nonna Knows Best is the perfect gift for anyone in need of a big warm Italian hug (and a container full of leftover pasta).


Humankind: A Hopeful History
Rutger Brugman

It’s a belief that unites the left and right, psychologists and philosophers, writers and historians. It drives the headlines that surround us and the laws that touch our lives. From Machiavelli to Hobbes, Freud to Dawkins, the roots of this belief have sunk deep into Western thought. Human beings, we’re taught, are by nature selfish and governed by self-interest.

Humankind makes a new argument- that it is realistic, as well as revolutionary, to assume that people are good. The instinct to cooperate rather than compete, trust rather than distrust, has an evolutionary basis going right back to the beginning of Homo sapiens. By thinking the worst of others, we bring out the worst in our politics and economics too.

In this major book, international-bestselling author Rutger Bregman takes some of the world’s most famous studies and events and reframes them, providing a new perspective on the last 200,000 years of human history. From the real-life Lord of the Flies to the cooperation seen in the aftermath of the Blitz, the hidden flaws in the Stanford Prison Experiment to the true story of the Kitty Genovese murder, Bregman shows how believing in human kindness and altruism can be a new way to think o and act as the foundation for achieving true change in our society.

It is time for a new view of human nature.


Radio Girl
David Dufty

As you climbed the rickety stairs of an old woolshed at Sydney harbour in 1944, you would hear the thrum of clicks and buzzes. Rows of men and women in uniforms and headsets would be tapping away vigorously at small machines, under the careful watch of their young female trainers. Presiding over the cacophony was a tiny woman, known to everyone as ‘Mrs Mac’, one of Australia’s wartime legends.

A smart girl from a poor mining town who loved to play with her father’s tools, Violet McKenzie became an electrical engineer, a pioneer of radio and a successful businesswoman. As the clouds of war gathered in the 1930s, she defied convention and trained young women in Morse code, foreseeing that their services would soon be sorely needed. Always a champion of women, she was instrumental in getting Australian women into the armed forces.

Mrs Mac was adored by the thousands of young women and men she trained, and came to be respected by the defence forces and the public too for her vision and contribution to the war effort. David Dufty brings her story to life in this heartwarming and captivating biography.


Resistance: A Songwriter’s Story of Hope, Change and Courage
Tori Amos

Since the release of her first, career-defining solo album Little Earthquakes, Tori Amos has been one of the music industry’s most enduring and ingenious artists. From her unnerving depiction of sexual assault in “Me and a Gun” to her post-9/11 album Scarlet’s Walk to her latest album Native Invader, her work has never shied away from intermingling the personal with the political.

Amos began playing piano as a teenager for the politically powerful at hotel bars in Washington, D.C., during the formative years of the post-Goldwater and then Koch-led Libertarian and Reaganite movements. The story continues to her time as a hungry artist in L.A. to the subsequent three decades of her formidable music career. Amos explains how she managed to create meaningful, politically resonant work against patriarchal power structures-and how her proud declarations of feminism and her fight for the marginalized always proved to be her guiding light. She teaches readers to engage with intention in this tumultuous global climate and speaks directly to supporters of #MeToo and #TimesUp, as well as young people fighting for their rights and visibility in the world.

Filled with compassionate guidance and actionable advice-and using some of the most powerful, political songs in Amos’s canon-this book is for readers determined to steer the world back in the right direction.


Inge’s War
Svenja O’Donnell

What does it mean to be on the wrong side of history?

Svenja O’Donnell’s beautiful, aloof grandmother Inge never spoke about the past. All her family knew was that she had grown up in a city that no longer exists on any map: Königsberg in East Prussia, a footnote in history, a place that almost no one has heard of today. But when Svenja impulsively visits this windswept Baltic city, something unlocks in Inge and, finally, she begins to tell her story.

It begins in the secret jazz bars of Hitler’s Berlin. It is a story of passionate first love, betrayal, terror, flight, starvation and violence. As Svenja teases out the threads of her grandmother’s life, retracing her steps all over Europe, she realises that there is suffering here on a scale that she had never dreamt of. And finally, she uncovers a desperately tragic secret that her grandmother has been keeping for sixty years.

Inge’s War listens to the voices that are often missing from our historical narrative – those of women caught up on the wrong side of history. It is a book about memory and heritage that interrogates the legacy passed down by those who survive. It also poses the questions: who do we allow to tell their story? What do we mean by family? And what will we do in order to survive?


Simply Living Well
Julia Watkins

Author Julia Watkins shares rituals, recipes, and projects for living simply and sustainably at home. For every area of your household – kitchen, cleaning, wellness, bath, and garden – Julia shows you how to eliminate wasteful packaging, harmful ingredients, and disposable items. Practical checklists outline easy swaps (instead of disposable sponges, opt for biodegradable sponges or Swedish dishcloths; choose a bamboo toothbrush over a plastic one) and sustainable upgrades for common household tools and products. Projects include scrap apple cider vinegar, wool dryer balls, kitchen bowl covers and cloth produce bags, non-toxic dryer sheets, all-purpose citrus cleaner, herbal tinctures and balms, and more, plus recipes for package-free essentials like homemade nut milk, hummus, ketchup, salad dressings, and veggie stock.

In 2017 Julia started her Instagram account, @simply.living.well, sharing her recipes, projects and thoughts around sustainable healthy living, inspired by wisdom rooted in traditional cultures and that of her own grandparents. Based on her hugely popular Instagram account, Julia’s book, Simply Living Well, is a comprehensive collection of her extensive yet accessible knowledge on sustainable living. Complete with her unique inviting aesthetic, it’s for every parent, millennial or anyone who cares about the health of of the planet we live on.


The Idea of the Brain: A History
Matthew Cobb

We’ve been trying to make sense of the link between our minds and our bodies since the very dawn of civilisation. Now the pace is hotting up.

Join the biologist and historian Matthew Cobb (Life’s Greatest Secret) to explore the weird theories, blasphemous experiments and terrifying operating theatres that got us here, to the cusp of revelation.

Written with ambition and verve and rooted in a solid scientific explanation of the issues, Thinking Matter spans the centuries to reveal how the lives and works of a parade of philosophers, surgeons, mystics and neuroscientists have shaped the way we understand ourselves at the most profound level. From primitive dissections to the latest complex computational models of brain function, Cobb charts the course of this continuing quest, and prepares us for the astonishing discoveries to come.


Orwell: A Man of Our Time
Richard Bradford

Despite the commonplace view that Animal Farm was aimed exclusively at Stalinist Russia, it was far more broadly focussed and the similarities between aspects of the novel and Trump’s America are obvious. `Not only the parallels with the current President, but also by those who feel that his cult of personality is a mandate for collective nastiness. ‘Doublethink’ features in Nineteen Eighty Four and it is the forerunner to ‘Fake News’.

Aside from Orwell’s importance as a political theorist and novelist his life in its own right is a beguiling narrative. His family was caught between upper middle-class complacency and uncertainty, and Orwell’s time at Prep School and as a scholarship boy at Eton caused him to despise the class system that spawned him despite finding himself unable to fully detach himself from it.

His life thereafter mirrored the history of his country; like many from his background he devoted himself to socialism as a salve to his conscience. He died at the point when Britain’s status as an Imperial and world power had waned.

An interest in him endures, principally because it is difficult to differentiate between the man who recorded the terrible events of the depression and the Spanish Civil War as an observer and the fiction writer who used literature to predict grim possibilities and diagnose horribly endemic inclinations. No other British writer of the 20th century has blended ideas, political commentary and literary art in such a manner.

For an author whose work has been regarded as the most important in terms of the turbulent years of the mid-20th century and who eroded the boundaries between literature, journalism and political commentary, there have been relatively few attempts to present a vibrant portrait of the man behind the writings. Fifteen years (closer to eighteen when this book appears) is a long time for the absence of a life of one of one of the best-known authors of the twentieth century.


Run to the Finish
Amanda Brooks

In her first book, popular runner blogger Amanda Brooks lays out the path to finding greater fulfilment in running for those who consider themselves “middle of the pack runners” – they’re not trying to win Boston (or even qualify for Boston); they just want to get strong and stay injury-free so they can continue to enjoy running.

Run to the Finish is not your typical running book. While it is filled with useful strategic training advice throughout, at its core, it is about embracing your place in the middle of the pack with humour and learning to love the run you’ve got without comparing yourself to other runners. Mixing practical advice like understanding the discomfort vs. pain, the mental side of running and movements to treat the most common injuries with more playful elements such as “Favourite hilarious marathon signs” and “Weird Thoughts We all Have at the Start Line,” Brooks is the down-to-earth, inspiring guide for everyone who wants to be happier with their run.


The Gardener’s Book of Patterns
Jack Wallington

Fully endorsed by the Royal Horticultural Society, this practical reference will help readers to create mood, proportion and scale in the garden. Packed with photos, images and illustrated planting plans featuring ‘patterns’ that can be scaled up or down to fit the area being planted. Examples include patterns for ‘natural’ designs as well as more formal approaches that create a stronger sense of order and detail.


Japanese Food Made Easy
Aya Nishimura

Japanese home cooking is simple – no need for the difficult techniques or hard-to-find produce sometimes used in restaurants. All you need are the well-selected ingredients and seasonings that elevate a dish to something truly special.

Japanese Food Made Easy showcases favourite recipes such as ramen, gyoza, teriyaki and tonkatsu, as well as Japanese dishes generally eaten at home, such as grilled peppers with bonito flakes, kakiage fritters and homemade fried tofu. You’ll discover how to make your own teriyaki sauce, tonkatsu sauce, miso dressing and shichimi togarashi (seven chilli mix) – these homemade versions are a healthier alternative to store-bought and will bring instant flavour to the simplest dish. There are also recipes for making dashi broth, sushi or sashimi from scratch, for those who want to try making more traditional Japanese food.


Indistractable
Nir Eyal

We are living through a crisis of distraction. Plans get sidetracked, friends are ignored, work never seems to get done.

Why does it feel like we’re distracting our lives away?

In Indistractable, behavioural designer Nir Eyal shows what life could look like if you followed through on your intentions. Instead of suggesting a digital detox, Eyal reveals the hidden psychology driving you to distraction, and teaches you how to make pacts with yourself to keep your brain on track. Indistractable is a guide to making decisions and seeing them through.

Empowering and optimistic, this is the book that will help you design your time, realise your ambitions, and live the life you really want.


Top End Girl
Miranda Tapsell

Sharing my story is important … I think it is true that you don’t aspire to be what you cannot see. I would like this book to show you that you can push yourself to do things you never dreamed you would do.

As a young Larrakia Tiwi girl Miranda Tapsell often felt like an outsider. Growing up, she looked for faces like hers on our screens. There weren’t many. And too often there was a negative narrative around First Nation lives, and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women especially. As she got older, Miranda stopped expecting others would help change things and set about doing something herself. Combining her pride in her Aboriginality and passion for romantic comedies with her love of Darwin, the Tiwi Islands and the Top End, Miranda co-wrote, produced and starred in the box office hit Top End Wedding.

In this engaging memoir, Miranda shares the path she took to acting and how her role in The Sapphires and then in Love Child inspired her to create a film about coming back to family and culture. And, it would turn out, that as she was writing her romantic lead she was also conjuring up some magic that saw a real-life love ignite. This deadly, ballad-loving rom-com nerd also asks us all to open our minds and our hearts to the importance of country and culture, In doing so, Miranda shows us how we will all be richer for it.

Funny, wise and thought-provoking, Top End Girl will have you at hello.


Perimenopower
Katarina Wilk

We hear a lot these days about the menopause, but there may be up to fifteen years of hormonal changes in a woman’s body before she reaches the point where her periods stop. These years can be turbulent both emotionally and physically – with panic attacks, insomnia, acne, hot flashes, weight gain and low moods. It’s not uncommon for women to feel like they’ve gone crazy.

But you’re not insane, you’re just perimenopausal. As our hormones fluctuate from our mid-thirties, so do the needs of our bodies. With the right lifestyle and dietary changes, you can turn the perimenopause into a powerful life transition towards a stronger, healthier and happier you.

Katarina Wilk’s frank and funny guide is the essential companion to finding your perimenopower.


Everyday Food as Medicine
Kerryn Phelps & Jamie Rose Chambers

Hippocrates famous quote as well as evidence from many other ancient cultures such as the Ayurvedic tradition proves that the link between diet, lifestyle and our health has been well known for thousands of years. Yet despite this, chronic disease is still the major cause of illness and mortality worldwide.

Drawing on the expertise of Prof. Kerryn Phelps and dietitian Jaime Rose Chambers, The Doctor and The Dietitian explain the role food plays in protecting your body against disease. Focusing on the brain, gut and heart, there are more than 100 recipes to help you on your way to better health.


I Quit Plastics and You Can Too
Kate Nelson

Kate Nelson has been disposable-plastic free for a decade. She started small- stopping her use of plastic bags and water bottles, refusing straws and carrying a reusable cup for takeaway coffee. But unhappy with how much plastic she still handled in her day-to-day life, she knew she had to do more. It took years, but Kate has developed effective strategies that others can easily adopt.

I Quit Plastics is an inspiring and practical guide to reducing your use of plastics, packed with information, ‘how-to’s and tips to help you cook, clean, shop, wear and live plastic-free. Kate shows how to reduce your waste and live more simply and sustainably, no matter where you’re starting from.
With over 60 recipes covering nutrition, bodycare, hygiene and cleaning Kate Nelson provides the tools you need to make small personal changes that have lasting global impact.


Limitless
Jim Kwik

For the last 25 years, Jim Kwik has helped everyone from celebrities to CEOs to students improve their memory, increase their decision-making skills, learn to speed-read and unleash their superbrains.

In Limitless, readers will learn Jim’s revolutionary strategies and shortcuts to break free from their perceived limitations. They’ll learn how to supercharge their brains with simple, actionable tools to sharpen the mind, enhance focus and fast-track their fullest potential. The book is organized into four sections- Mindset, Motivation, Meta- Learning and Mission. Readers will discover the myths they’ve been told about their IQ, abilities and skillset; understand why learning matters; learn core habits and steps to becoming limitless; and explore how they can serve the world. They’ll also learn how to conquer the four supervillains- Distraction, Digital Dementia, Digital Deluge and Depression.

Believing that you are limited is holding you back from achieving your biggest dreams. But we all have superpowers inside of us, and the key to activating those superpowers is unlimiting yourself.


APRIL NEW RELEASES

FICTION

The Dickens Boy
Tom Keneally

In the late 1800s, rather than run the risk of his under-achieving sons tarnishing his reputation at home, Charles Dickens sent two of them to Australia.

The tenth child of Charles Dickens, Edward Bulwer Lytton Dickens, known as Plorn, had consistently proved unable ‘to apply himself ’ to school or life. So aged sixteen, he is sent, as his brother Alfred was before him, to Australia.

Plorn arrives in Melbourne in late 1868 carrying a terrible secret. He has never read a word of his father’s work. He is sent out to a 2000-square-mile station in remotest New South Wales to learn to become a man, and a gentleman stockman, from the most diverse and toughest of companions. In the outback he becomes enmeshed with Paakantji, colonists, colonial-born, ex-convicts, ex-soldiers, and very few women.

Plorn, unexpectedly, encounters the same veneration of his father and familiarity with Dickens’ work in Australia as was rampant in England. Against this backdrop, and featuring cricket tournaments, horse-racing, bushrangers, sheep droving, shifty stock and station agents, frontier wars and first encounters with Australian women, Plorn meets extraordinary people and enjoys wonderful adventures as he works to prove himself.

This is Tom Keneally in his most familiar terrain. Taking historical figures and events and reimagining them with verve, compassion and humour. It is a triumph.


The Dictionary of Lost Words
Pip Williams

Motherless and irrepressibly curious, Esme spends her childhood in the Scriptorium, a garden shed in Oxford where her father and a team of lexicographers are gathering words for the very first Oxford English Dictionary.

Esme’s place is beneath the sorting table, unseen and unheard. One day, she sees a slip containing the word bondmaid flutter to the floor unclaimed. Esme seizes the word and hides it in an old wooden trunk that belongs to her friend, Lizzie, a young servant in the big house. Esme begins to collect other words from the Scriptorium that are misplaced, discarded or have been neglected by the dictionary men. They help her make sense of the world.

Over time, Esme realises that some words are considered more important than others, and that words and meanings relating to women’s experiences often go unrecorded. She begins to collect words for another dictionary: The Dictionary of Lost Words.

Set when the women’s suffrage movement was at its height and the Great War loomed, The Dictionary of Lost Words reveals a lost narrative, hidden between the lines of a history written by men. It’s a delightful, lyrical and deeply thought-provoking celebration of words, and the power of language to shape our experience of the world.


Providence
Max Barry

The video changed everything. Before that, we could believe that we were safe. Special. Chosen. We thought the universe was a twinkling ocean of opportunity, waiting to be explored. 

Afterward, we knew better.

Seven years after first contact, Providence Five launches. It is an enormous and deadly warship, built to protect humanity from its greatest ever threat. On board is a crew of just four-tasked with monitoring the ship and reporting the war’s progress to a mesmerized global audience by way of social media.

But while pursuing the enemy across space, Gilly, Talia, Anders, and Jackson confront the unthinkable: their communications are cut, their ship decreasingly trustworthy and effective. To survive, they must win a fight that is suddenly and terrifyingly real.

An inventive, speculative adventure and the intimate tale of four people facing their most desperate hour – alone, together, at the edge of the universe.


Gathering Dark
Candice Fox

A convicted killer. A gifted thief. A vicious crime boss. A disillusioned cop.
Together they’re a missing girl’s only hope.

Blair Harbour, once a wealthy, respected surgeon in Los Angeles, is now an ex-con down on her luck. She’s determined to keep her nose clean to win back custody of her son.

But when her former cellmate, Sneak Lawlor, begs for help to find her missing daughter, Blair is compelled to put her new-found freedom on the line. Joined by LA’s most feared underworld figure, Ada Maverick, the crew of criminals bring outlaw tactics to the search for Dayly.

Detective Jessica Sanchez has always had a difficult relationship with the LAPD. And her inheritance of a $7 million mansion as a reward for catching a killer has just made her police enemy number one.

It’s been ten years since Jessica arrested Blair for the cold-blooded murder of her neighbour. So when Jessica opens the door to the disgraced doctor and her friends early one morning she expects abuse, maybe even violence.

What comes instead is a plea for help.


The Loudness of Unsaid Things
Hilde Hinton

Miss Kaye works at The Institute. A place for the damaged, the outliers, the not-quite rights. Everyone has different strategies to deal with the residents. Some bark orders. Some negotiate tirelessly. Miss Kaye found that simply being herself was mostly the right thing to do.

Susie was seven when she realised she’d had her fill of character building. She’d lie between her Holly Hobbie sheets thinking how slowly birthdays come around, but how quickly change happened. One minute her Dad was saying that the family needed to move back to the city and then, SHAZAM, they were there. Her mum didn’t move to the new house with them. And Susie hated going to see her mum at the mind hospital. She never knew who her mum would be. Or who would be there. As the years passed, there were so many things Susie wanted to say but never could.

Miss Kaye will teach Susie that the loudness of unsaid things can be music – and together they will learn that living can be more than surviving.


Sheerwater
Leah Swann

Ava and her two young sons, Max and Teddy, are driving to their new home in Sheerwater, hopeful of making a fresh start in a new town, although Ava can’t help but keep looking over her shoulder. They’re almost at their destination when they witness a shocking accident – a light plane crashing in the field next to the road. Ava stops to help, but when she gets back to the car, she realises that somehow, among the smoke, fire and confusion, her sons have gone missing …

From a substantial new Australian writing talent, Sheerwater is tense, emotional, unforgettable. Perfect for readers of Mark Brandi’s Wimmera and Stephanie Bishop’s The Other Side of the World, this is a beautifully written, propulsive, gut-wrenching and unputdownable novel – an aching, powerful story of the heroic acts we are capable of in the name of love.


Stone Sky Gold Mountain
Mirandi Riwoe

Family circumstances force siblings Ying and Lai Yue to flee their home in China to seek their fortunes in Australia. Life on the gold fields is hard, and they soon abandon the diggings and head to nearby Maytown. Once there, Lai Yue finds a job as a carrier on an overland expedition, while Ying finds work in a local store and strikes up a friendship with Meriem, a young white woman with her own troubled past. When a serious crime is committed, suspicion falls on all those who are considered outsiders.

Evoking the rich, unfolding tapestry of Australian life in the late nineteenth century, Stone Sky Gold Mountain is a heartbreaking and universal story about the exiled and displaced, about those who encounter discrimination yet yearn for acceptance.


The Glass Hotel
Emily St John Mandel

Vincent is the beautiful bartender at the Hotel Caiette, a five-star glass-and-cedar palace on the northernmost tip of Vancouver Island. New York financier Jonathan Alkaitis owns the hotel. When he passes Vincent his card with a tip, it’s the beginning of their life together. That same day, a hooded figure scrawls a note on the windowed wall of the hotel: ‘Why don’t you swallow broken glass.’ Leon Prevant, a shipping executive for a company called Neptune-Avramidis, sees the note from the hotel bar and is shaken to his core. Thirteen years later Vincent mysteriously disappears from the deck of a Neptune-Avramidis ship

Weaving together the lives of these characters, Emily St John Mandel’s The Glass Hotel moves between the ship, the skyscrapers of Manhattan, and the wilderness of remote British Columbia, painting a breathtaking picture of greed and guilt, fantasy and delusion, art and the ghosts of our pasts. The extraordinary new novel from the bestselling, award-winning author of Station Eleven.


Hamnet
Maggie O’Farrell

On a summer’s day in 1596, a young girl in Stratford-upon-Avon takes to her bed with a fever. Her twin brother, Hamnet, searches everywhere for help. Why is nobody at home?

Their mother, Agnes, is over a mile away, in the garden where she grows medicinal herbs. Their father is working in London. Neither parent knows that one of the children will not survive the week.

Hamnet is a novel inspired by the son of a famous playwright. It is a story of the bond between twins, and of a marriage pushed to the brink by grief. It is also the story of a kestrel and its mistress; flea that boards a ship in Alexandria; and a glovemaker’s son who flouts convention in pursuit of the woman he loves. Above all, it is a tender and unforgettable reimagining of a boy whose life has been all but forgotten, but whose name was given to one of the most celebrated plays ever written.


The Motion of the Body Through Space
Lionel Shriver

Allergic to group activities of any kind, all her life Serenata has run, swum, and cycled – on her lonesome. But now that she’s hit 60, all that physical activity has destroyed her knees. As she contemplates surgery with dread, her previously sedentary husband Remington, recently and ignominiously redundant, chooses this precise moment to discover exercise.

Which should be good for his health, right? Yet as he joins the cult of fitness that seems increasingly to consume the whole of the Western world, her once-modest husband burgeons into an unbearable narcissist. Ignoring all his other obligations in the service of extreme sport, he engages a saucy, taunting personal trainer named Bambi, who treats his wife with contempt. When Remington announces his intention to compete in a legendarily gruelling triathlon, MettleMan, Serenata is sure he’s going to end up injured or dead – but the stubbornness of an ageing man in Lycra is not to be underestimated.

The story of an obsession, of a marriage, of a betrayal: The Motion of the Body Through Space is Lionel Shriver at her hilarious, sharp-eyed, audacious best.


Redhead by the Side of the Road
Anne Tyler

Micah Mortimer isn’t the most polished person you’ll ever meet. His numerous sisters and in-laws regard him oddly but very fondly, but he has his ways and means of navigating the world. He measures out his days running errands for work – his TECH HERMIT sign cheerily displayed on the roof of his car – maintaining an impeccable cleaning regime and going for runs (7-15, every morning). He is content with the steady balance of his life.

But then the order of things starts to tilt. His woman friend Cassia (he refuses to call anyone in her late thirties a ‘girlfriend’) tells him she’s facing eviction because of a cat. And when a teenager shows up at Micah’s door claiming to be his son, Micah is confronted with another surprise he seems poorly equipped to handle.

Redhead by the Side of the Road is an intimate look into the heart and mind of a man who sometimes finds those around him just out of reach – and a love story about the differences that make us all unique.


Hitler’s Peace
Philip Kerr

Autumn 1943. Hitler knows he cannot win the war: now he must find a way to make peace. FDR and Stalin are willing to negotiate; only Churchill refuses to listen. The upcoming Allied Tehran conference will be where the next steps – whatever they are – will be decided.

Into this nest of double- and triple-dealing steps Willard Mayer, OSS agent and FDR’s envoy to the conference. His job is to secure the peace that the USA and Hitler now crave. The stakes couldn’t be higher.

Showcasing Philip Kerr’s brilliant research and masterful plotting at its best, Hitler’s Peace is a fitting coda to the career of one of the masters of the historical thriller.


NON-FICTION

Friends and Rivals
Brenda Niall

Four Australian women writing in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries-a time when stories of bush heroism and mateship abounded, a time when a writing career might be an elusive thing for a woman.

Friends and Rivals is a vivid and engaging account of the intersecting and entwined lives of Ethel Turner, author of the much loved Seven Little Australians, Barbara Baynton, who wrote of the harshness of bush life, Nettie Palmer, essayist and critic, and Henry Handel Richardson, of The Getting of Wisdom and The Fortunes of Richard Mahoney fame.

Brenda Niall illuminates a fascinating time in Australia’s literary history and brings to life the remarkable women who made it so.


Daddy Cool
Darleen Bungey

Who can ever truly know their parents?

He was a glamorous heart-throb, a famous American singer performing in front of Bette Davis, Katharine Hepburn, Clark Gable and other stars at the Academy Awards. In the 1930s, his recording of ‘Hawaiian Paradise’ outsold those of Bing Crosby and Guy Lombardo.

So how did he become an Australian infantryman, fighting alongside and performing for his fellow Diggers in Palestine, Beirut, Egypt and New Guinea? Why did he leave Hollywood and the ritziest hotels in America for a modest Californian bungalow in suburban Sydney? And what caused him to cease his endless drifting from one woman to another, one marriage to another, and settle with the love of his life?

She was a strong Aussie woman, a talented radio broadcaster and publicity agent. Why did she take a chance on this reckless vagabond and notorious womaniser?

Seeking answers, Darleen Bungey turns her biographical skills on her own family, exploring her father’s multi-layered and at times tempestuous life with a truthful eye and loving heart.


Captain Cook’s Epic Voyage
Geoffrey Blainey

In 1768 Captain James Cook and his crew set sail on a small British naval vessel, the boldly named Endeavour, bound for the Pacific Ocean. He was ordered to establish an observatory at Tahiti in order to record the 1769 transit of Venus, and – with the skills of naturalist Joseph Banks and his team – to collect natural history in this far part of the world. But Cook’s brief also included a secret mission from the British Admiralty: to discover Terra Australis Incognita, an unknown southern land that might prove to be larger and richer than Australia.

Cook was not alone in this quest, and the Endeavour shared the Coral Sea and coastal New Zealand with an armed French merchant ship commanded by Jean de Surville. Eventually in 1770 Cook’s ship crossed the Tasman Sea and reached the southern coast of New South Wales. Sailing north, he charted Australia’s eastern coastline and claimed it for Great Britain. It was the most significant of Cook’s voyages, transforming the world map and the way Europeans viewed the South Pacific Ocean and its lands and peoples.

On this 250th anniversary of his major discovery, Captain Cook’s Epic Voyage reveals the hardships, adventure and achievements of Cook’s most important voyage. Reshaping his previous book, Sea of Dangers , Professor Geoffrey Blainey takes us on a vivid journey, challenging accepted views and the intersection of myth, science and exploration.


Grandmothers: Essays by 21st Century Grandmothers
Helen Elliott

An anthology of essays by twenty-four Australian women, edited by Helen Elliott, about the many aspects of being a grandmother in the 21st century. It seems so different from the experience we had of our grandmothers. Although perhaps the human essential, love, hasn’t shifted much? In thoughtful, provoking, uncompromising writing, a broad range of women reflect on vastly diverse experiences. This period of a woman’s life, a continuation and culmination, is as defining as any other and the words ‘grand’ and ‘mother’ rearrange and realign themselves into bright focus.

The contributors- Stephanie Alexander, Maggie Beer, Judith Brett, Jane Caro, Elizabeth Cheung, Cresside Collette, Ali Cobby Eckermann, Helen Garner, Anastasia Gonis, Glenda Guest, Katherine Hattam, Celestine Hitiura Vaite, Yvette Holt, Cheryl Kernot, Ramona Koval, Alison Lester, Joan London, Jenny Macklin, Auntie Daphnie Milward, Mona Mobarek, Carol Raye and Gillian Triggs.


A Bigger Picture
Malcolm Turnbull

When Malcolm Turnbull took over the nation’s top job there was a sense of excitement in Australia. Sky-high opinion polls followed as the political outsider with a successful business, legal and media career took charge. The infighting that dogged politics for the best part of a decade looked to be over. But a right-wing insurgency brutally cut down Turnbull’s time in office after three years, leaving many Australians asking, ‘Why?’

Exceptionally candid and compelling, A Bigger Picture is the definitive narrative of Malcolm Turnbull’s prime ministership. He describes how he legalised same-sex marriage, established Snowy Hydro 2.0, stood up to Donald Trump, rebooted Australia’s defence industry and many more achievements – remarkable in their pace, significance and that they were delivered in the teeth of so much opposition. But it’s far more than just politics. Turnbull’s life has been filled with colourful characters and controversies, success and failure. From his early years in Sydney, growing up with a single father, to defending ‘Spycatcher’ Peter Wright against the UK Government; the years representing Kerry Packer, leading the Republican Movement and making millions in business; and finally toppling Tony Abbott to become Prime Minister of Australia. For the first time he tells it all – in his own words.

With revelatory insights on the workings of Canberra and the contentious events of Turnbull’s life, A Bigger Picture explores the strengths and vulnerabilities of one of Australia’s best-known and dynamic business and political leaders. Lyrically written in highly readable and entertaining prose, this is a genuine page-turner that’s not just for political junkies.


Falastin
Sami Tamimi & Tara Wigley

FALASTIN is a love letter to Palestine, the land and its people; an evocative collection of over 110 unforgettable recipes and stories from the co-authors of Jerusalem and Ottolenghi: The Cookbook, and Ottolenghi SIMPLE.

Travelling through Bethlehem, East Jerusalem, Nablus, Haifa, Akka, Nazareth, Galilee and the West Bank, Sami and Tara invite you to experience and enjoy unparalleled access to Sami’s homeland. As each region has its own distinct identity and tale to tell, there are endless new flavour combinations to discover.

The food is the perfect mix of traditional and contemporary, with recipes that have been handed down through the generations and reworked for a modern home kitchen, alongside dishes that have been inspired by Sami and Tara’s collaborations with producers and farmers throughout Palestine.

With stunning food and travel photography plus stories from unheard Palestinian voices, this innovative cookbook will transport you to this rich and complex land.

So get ready to laden your table with the most delicious of foods – from abundant salads, soups and wholesome grains to fluffy breads, easy one-pot dishes and perfumed sweet treats – here are simple feasts to be shared and everyday meals to be enjoyed. These are stunning Palestinian-inspired dishes that you will want to cook, eat, fall in love with and make your own.


Fourteen
Shannon Molloy

This is a story about my fourteenth year of life as a gay kid at an all-boys rugby-mad Catholic school in regional Queensland. It was a year in which I started to discover who I was, and deeply hated what was revealed. It was a year in which I had my first crush and first devastating heartbreak. It was a year of torment, bullying and betrayal – not just at the hands of my peers, but by adults who were meant to protect me.

And it was a year that almost ended tragically.

I found solace in writing and my budding journalism; in a close-knit group of friends, all growing up too quickly together; and in the fierce protection of family and a mother’s unconditional love. These were moments of light and hilarity that kept me going.

As much as Fourteen is a chronicle of the enormous struggle and adversity I endured, and the shocking consequences of it all, it’s also a tale of survival.

Because I did survive.


Design Lives Here
Penny Craswell

Australian design has forged its own unique trajectory, influenced by geographic isolation, a distinctive natural environment and a modern sensibility. Design Lives Here showcases the best of Australian residential architecture and interiors, and pays homage to the local designers and makers who have crafted bespoke pieces of furniture and lighting for these homes, whether large or small.

From a reimagined Californian bungalow with a dining table inspired by the humble HB pencil to a monumental inner-city residence furnished with more than 100 custom pieces, these houses – and the objects that reside within – offer a compelling snapshot of contemporary Australian design through the lens of materiality, utility, site and place.


Pedantic
Ross Petras & Kathryn Petras

Your boss makes a joke about Schrodinger’s cat – something you’ve heard of, but what exactly happened (or didn’t happen) with that cat? Or you’re reading a New Yorker article that explains that ‘Solecism slipped into solipsism into full-blown narcissistic projection.’ An excellent point . . . if you know what ‘solecism’ means . . . or, for that matter, ‘solipsism’.

Language gurus Ross Petras and Kathryn Petras explain all of the words and phrases smart people should know. Covering the worlds of science, the arts and philosophy, they explore broad topics, like quantum physics and ontology, and more specific ones, like shibboleth and bete noire. From Latin phrases we often hear and read (prima facie, sui generis and the like) to those pesky words that have entered our vocabularies from other languages (bildungsroman, sturm und drang), this book will inform and delight even the most pernickety word nerds.

A compendium of 100 words and phrases smart people use – even if they only kinda sorta (secretly don’t) know what they mean – with pithy definitions and fascinating etymologies to solidify their meanings.


Party Animals: The Secret History of a Labor Fiasco
Samantha Maiden

How did Labor lose the unlosable election?

Secrets, lies, lawyers and covert recordings. If you thought the 2019 election was just about a death tax that didn’t exist, you’re in for a surprise.

From the dark arts of the dirt units to the role of billionaire Clive Palmer, this is the untold story of an election debacle.

The Labor Party was the unbeatable favourite to win the 2019 election right up until the polls closed and voters delivered the surprise verdict.

If the results staggered pundits, they also shocked Bill Shorten and his frontbench, who had spent the final weeks of the campaign carefully planning for their first days in office. Party Animals uncovers the secret history of a Labor fiasco, the untold story behind Scott Morrison’s miracle


Phosphorescence
Julia Baird

Over the last decade, we have become better at knowing what brings us contentment, well-being and joy. We know, for example, that there are a few core truths to science of happiness. We know that being kind and altruistic makes us happy, that turning off devices, talking to people, forging relationships, living with meaning and delving into the concerns of others offer our best chance at achieving happiness. But how do we retain happiness? It often slips out of our hands as quickly as we find it. So, when we are exposed to, or learn, good things, how do we continue to burn with them?

And more than that, when our world goes dark, when we’re overwhelmed by illness or heartbreak, loss or pain, how do we survive, stay alive or even bloom? In the muck and grit of a daily existence full of disappointments and a disturbing lack of control over many of the things that matter most – finite relationships, fragile health, fraying economies, a planet in peril – how do we find, nurture and carry our own inner, living light – a light to ward off the darkness?

Absorbing, achingly beautiful, inspiring and deeply moving, Julia Baird has written exactly the book we need for these times.


The Future of Us: Demography Gets a Makeover
Liz Allen

Demography is far more important than destiny.

By tracing connections between a population’s past and present, demographers can foresee its future. The true wonder of demography, though, is not its ability to predict the future but to shape it. With energy and passion, demographer Liz Allen sets out the potential paths to make Australia better.

Bold, fearless and revealing, The Future of Us does more than help you find your inner statistician. Looking beyond births, deaths and marriages, Allen takes apart inequality, migration, tax and home ownership. She also dissects how the word ‘population’ became so charged, daring to ask what Australia might look like in 20 years if we had zero immigration.
The Future of Us gives demography a makeover and sets out future possibilities for a better us … just like a Choose Your Own Adventure, but for the nation.


Life in a Box
Sarah Jane Adams

Auction catalogues can reveal a lot about a person: their life, their loves and their style. Antique jewellery dealer Sarah Jane Adams became an international model and overnight Instagram sensation in her sixties. She tells her story through a lifetime’s collection of rare pieces and worthless objects, as well as personal photographs and effects from her ‘estate’.

Told with wit, pathos and charm. Life In A Box illustrates the deeply personal connection that we have with our belongings: they are laden with rich meaning and adventure and, above all, redolent of our stories.


An Australian Garden 
Philip Cox

The far south coast of New South Wales is a magical place, with remote coastlines, sheltered lagoons and pristine hinterland meeting mountain ranges. It was also once an area partly depleted by logging and long-term agricultural use. Some forty years ago, renowned architect Philip Cox and a group of like-minded friends purchased 80 hectares as a private retreat and a conservation exercise. Applying his own aesthetic principles of vista, light, texture, colour and mass, Philip worked with nature to reveal and enhance the bushland in an enticing way.

He replanted trees in denuded areas, cleared scrubby undergrowth in others and added lakes and ponds. Carefully, he curated extensive walks through bush and gullies, along the coast and river, offering wondrous experiences. These walks are punctuated with drama and romance as you enter various garden rooms and encounter sculptures, waterlily-adorned lakes, ponds and art-filled pavilions. As the world becomes more global, maintaining indigenous Australian landscapes and gardens becomes important. This book


Fathoms
Rebecca Giggs

When Rebecca Giggs encountered a humpback whale stranded on her local beach in Australia, she began to wonder how the lives of whales might shed light on the condition of our seas. How do whales experience environmental change? Has our connection to these fabled animals been transformed by technology? What future awaits us, and them? And what does it mean to write about nature in the midst of an ecological crisis?

In Fathoms: the world in the whale, Giggs blends natural history, philosophy, and science to explore these questions with clarity and hope. In lively, inventive prose, she introduces us to whales so rare they have never been named; she tells us of the astonishing variety found in whale sounds, and of whale ‘pop’ songs that sweep across hemispheres. She takes us into the deeps to discover that one whale’s death can spark a great flourishing of creatures. We travel to Japan to board whaling ships, examine the uncanny charisma of these magnificent mammals, and confront the plastic pollution now pervading their underwater environment.

In the spirit of Rachel Carson and John Berger, Fathoms is a work of profound insight and wonder. It marks the arrival of an essential new voice in narrative nonfiction and provides us with a powerful, surprising, and compelling view of some of the most urgent issues of our time.


Every Conceivable Way
Despina Meris

After relocating to Australia from New York, Despina Meris and her husband, Bill, settle down to baby-making. What they never expect is a string of heartbreaking unexplained miscarriages, even with the help of IVF. They turn to surrogacy – first in India, then in the Ukraine and finally in Thailand, where their baby is conceived.

But more drama unfolds when, overnight, they are caught up in the Thai government crackdown on commercial surrogacy, leaving them with no way of contacting their pregnant surrogate. Every Conceivable Way, a real-life story that is stranger than fiction, asks how far you would go before you call it quits, when it seems like all the odds are stacked against you.

Every Conceivable Way recounts one couple’s nine-year quest to become parents, while giving an inside peek into the IVF and surrogacy industries, the fertility merry-go-round, and what it’s like to live for years with uncertainty.

Tips for Using our Online Store

There are several ways to access our Online Store:

  1. Click on the orange ‘SHOP ONLINE’ tab, which appears at the left of screen at all times on all pages of our main site (this site) or click the button here to the right:
  2. If you find a book description you like on our website, for example in our monthly New Releases, click the ‘BUY NOW’ button to go directly to that title in the Online Store.
  3. Follow links shared through our Social Media sites (Facebook or Instagram).
  4. Copy and paste the Store address into a new tab or window of your internet browser: https://shop.farrells.com.au.

Always remember you can phone or email us directly during regular trading hours if you can’t find what you a looking for – we will always be happy to help.

Browsing the Online Store

Use the Featured menus in the Store sidebar:
  • New Releases displays all titles in our system which are to be published in the current month. For items listing as out of stock under this menu, check their publication date – they may not be due for release until later in the month.
  • Reading Guides displays all items appearing in our various seasonal catalogues. Select the catalogue you wish to browse. Alternatively you can view the catalogues directly by clicking on the images in the slider at the top of the Store.
  • For all items in the Featured menus, titles will display as being in stock or out of stock. If an item is listed as out of stock, you can still order it through the website – we will contact you to advise likely time frame for fulfillment of your order.
Select the genre sidebar heading you are interested in – browse through the titles listed.
  • For all items in the genre menus, only items currently in stock will be displayed or appear in search results. This does not mean the item is unavailable – we may simply have sold out temporarily and be awaiting further stock. Always contact us directly by phone or email if you can’t find an item you are looking for – we will happily investigate further for you.
  • We have thousands of titles in stock at any time – consider using the ‘Search’ box at the top right of the Store to narrow your results by a favourite author or title you may have heard about. See tips below.

Searching for a specific author or book

You can search by title keyword, author name or ISBN (a unique book identifying number – 13 digits, starting with a ‘9’).
Tips for searching:
  • Use less common words – this will narrow your search results.
    • Example: One Hundred Years of Solitude – searching by ‘solitude’ will give fewer results than searching by ‘one’ or ‘hundred’
  • For long titles, only use one or two keywords – do not enter the whole title.
    • Example: The One Hundred Year Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared – search using ‘hundred’ only.
  • Do not use punctuation.
    • Example: For Gulliver’s Wife, remove the apostrophe before searching: gullivers NOT gulliver’s.
  • Use combination searches of title keyword and author to narrow your search results.
    • Example: For Lee Child’s Blue Moon, instead of searching by ‘child’, ‘blue’ or ‘moon’ (all common words), use a combination such as ‘child blue’ or ‘child moon’ to narrow the results.
If you get a ‘no match’ message for your search, there may be several reasons:
  • we do not currently have that item in stock.
  • you may have misspelled a word or have a title or author’s name incorrect:
    • Example: Many people mistakenly refer to Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale as The Handmaiden’s Tale. Searching by ‘handmaiden’ as a keyword will return a ‘no match’ even if we have the book in stock.
  • you may have included too many search terms (see earlier tips for searching).
In all cases, if you get a ‘no match’ result – phone or email us and we can investigate further for you.

Always be sure to read the Frequently Asked Questions page on the Online Store before purchasing to ensure you understand the process for buying online. If we haven’t covered your question, just phone or email us and we’ll be happy to help.

Pandemic 2020: All Up to Date Information

Last updated: 7pm Saturday 23 May 2020

TRADING HOURS:

Monday – Friday 9am til 4pm

Saturday 9am til 2pm

Sundays CLOSED

ONLINE SALES 24 / 7 @ www.farrells.com.au

The following restrictions to our services currently apply:

  • Prepayment by phone / online order with quick collection is still preferred to minimise contact for staff and customers.
  • Customers will be allowed in store, subject to the following entry conditions:
    • using hand sanitister on entry and prior to handling any stock;
    • observing social distance of 1.5m from staff and other customers at all times;
    • browsing time will be limited to 15 minutes;
    • minimal touching of stock;
    • number of customers in store at any one time will be limited by staff as required – if you are asked to wait until someone has exited to enter the store, please be patient and observe social distancing while waiting outside. Maximum numbers in different areas of the shop may also be enforced independently to the total number of customers in the shop (eg. if there are too many people in the children’s area at one time, customers may be asked to take turns in order to keep numbers to safe levels in the smaller space).
  • Payment by EFTPOS or gift voucher only
  • We are not currently accepting cash
  • Staff time to provide recommendations will be limited.
  • Postage is available throughout Australia. $11 flat rate. Express post available also – price dependent on purchase. Delivery times entirely dependent on Australia Post service.

We thank you for your understanding and patience as we continue to take measures to find balance between the need to provide a safe environment for our staff and community and to still continue trying to meet our customer needs.

Please be kind to our staff – they are doing their utmost to help everyone, but are operating under very difficult circumstances. We will do our best to help you however we can.

We will continue to provide updates on our trading hours and conditions here and on social media as any official advice changes.

Thanks again for your ongoing support.

Farrells’ Response to COVID-19 Pandemic

We wanted to let you know what we’re doing here at Farrells in response to the COVID-19 corona virus pandemic.

Like all of you, we’re concerned primarily with the safety and wellbeing of family, friends and staff. We are monitoring all official advice as it comes to hand and updating our responses accordingly when and where required.  As you would be aware things are changing constantly and at times very rapidly – please be assured we are doing our best to respond as required.  In light of this, also bear in mind that the information in this update may change, in which case we will update you again if and when required. 

We have taken a number of measures to do what we can to mitigate the health risk if you come into the shop, but also want to provide you with risk-free alternatives for purchasing books if you are in quarantine or self-isolation or are simply trying to minimise your public contact where possible.
Please note our IN STORE measures and HOME DELIVERY SERVICE detailed below.


In Store Measures

Firstly, to try and stay open, with healthy people serving you, for as long as possible, these are the steps we have implemented:

  • Hygiene measures—increased regular cleaning, using disinfectant, of all surfaces, door handles, EFTPOS machines and computers; regular hand-washing / sanitising.
  • Changes to store layout—to improve the ability to adhere to social distancing recommendations of 1.5m between people. 
  • Reduced staff numbers—we have a number of vulnerable family members in our extended Farrells family and as such have given staff the option of voluntary leave. This means we are operating on reduced staff and would appreciate your patience and understanding in how this may impact our ability to serve you quickly. 
  • Staff health—staff exhibiting any signs of illness will not be attending work until well. 
  • Contactless card payments—are preferred to minimise passing of cash from hand to hand, though cash will still be accepted.  Staff will wash hands after handling cash transactions—please be patient when this is required.
  • Prepayment for quick collection—books may be ordered by phone (5975 5034) or email (info@farrells.com.au) with prepayment by phone for quick collection in store, minimising your contact time in public (NB: this is not an option if you are in self isolation or quarantine following return from overseas – see other options available). 
  • Compliance with non-essential gatherings directives—numbers of people in store will be kept under the 4m2 directive and all coming events have been cancelled including Preschool Storytime sessions, March author visits and Book Club groups.  Decisions on later events will be made based on advice closer to the time.


Temporary Home Delivery Service

We will be providing a temporary local home delivery service as of Thursday 19 March. This is to continue service for those in self isolation or quarantine and to encourage people to comply with social distancing recommendations–if you are unwell, please consider others and stay at home.  However, we are a small business covering a large geographic area with limited resources—please consider whether you need home delivery or can opt to prepay and collect in store instead

There are two ways you can order a book for home delivery – the first and fastest is by phoning us on 5975 5034 during our regular trading hours, the second is by emailing us at info@farrells.com.au (note we will only process email orders during our regular trading hours Monday to Friday). 

Terms and Conditions for FREE Local Home Delivery
  • Minimum purchase value of $25
  • Payment by credit card only
  • Deliveries Monday to Friday only
  • Purchases will be delivered to your letterbox or doorstep and delivery confirmed with a text message, so please ensure your address and mobile number are correct when you place your order.
  • Orders processed before 3pm each day will be delivered:

Farrells reserves the right to vary any and all home delivery
terms and conditions at any time without prior notice

Support Your LOCAL Small Businesses

A note on Western Port suburbs – we are aware we have many regular customers in these areas and wish to continue supplying you where possible, however we would also urge to you consider supporting our friends at Peterson’s Bookshop in Hastings (5979 8233) if it is easier / faster for you to access their service than wait for home delivery from us.

Similarly for the Southern Peninsula (all suburbs south of Rosebud), please contact our friends at Antipodes Bookshop in Sorrento (5984 4217) to see how they can meet your needs at this time.

We would urge you all to support your local small businesses of all kinds however you can – this situation will have a long term impact.  We will be doing our best to adapt and be innovative so please ensure you take the time to see how you can continue to support us and them and ensure that we can keep as many in our community open and providing employment as long as possible.  


Special Orders

As always, if we do not have an item you require in stock we are happy to order it in for you (pending availability).  Until further notice, however, please note the following exceptions to special order items:

  • for items coming from certain smaller suppliers we will be requiring payment in full at time of order.  We will advise if your order is impacted by this. 
  • we will not be ordering overseas stock items.  This is because of the uncertainties around delivery timeframes due to disruptions to shipping and air freight routes and in pricing due to current volatility in exchange rate fluctuations. Where an item is warehoused in Australia, we will do our best to order it in for you. 

The Importance of Community

These are uncertain times and many people are understandably feeling anxious and worried about the present and future.  Farrells has been a part of the Mornington Peninsula community for more than 40 years and we understand and are proud that many consider us an important part of their lives – as a meeting place for community, support and shared love of books and reading and all the ways they can enrich our lives. 

We strongly believe we can get through this unusual time if we stay strong in our community ties and look out for each other and especially the most vulnerable amongst us.  We would urge everyone to show compassion and choose kindness, ask for or offer help where and when it is needed, and stay calm in response to events unfolding.  If you are feeling overly anxious, turn off the news for a while, sit outside in the sunshine, call and speak to a friend, listen to some music – focus on the things you can control and try not to worry too much about those you can’t.  

Remember that reading and books can provide a wonderful escape from the stressors of the present – they also don’t requiring charging or broadband and don’t have expiry dates. 

Please stay safe and well and let us know however we may be of continued service to you.  The sun is currently shining and is a great way to kill off bugs – so get outside and enjoy it with a good read!

Best wishes,
Ian, Meredith, Kate, Suzie and all the Farrells Gang

MARCH NEW RELEASES

FICTION

The Mirror and the Light (Wolf Hall #3)
Hilary Mantel

England, May 1536. Anne Boleyn is dead, decapitated in the space of a heartbeat by a hired French executioner. As her remains are bundled into oblivion, Thomas Cromwell breakfasts with the victors. The blacksmith’s son from Putney emerges from the spring’s bloodbath to continue his climb to power and wealth, while his formidable master, Henry VIII, settles to short-lived happiness with his third queen, before Jane dies giving birth to the male heir he most craves.

Cromwell is a man with only his wits to rely on; he has no great family to back him, no private army. Despite rebellion at home, traitors plotting abroad and the threat of invasion testing Henry’s regime to breaking point, Cromwell’s robust imagination sees a new country in the mirror of the future. But can a nation, or a person, shed the past like a skin? Do the dead continually unbury themselves? What will you do, the Spanish ambassador asks Cromwell, when the king turns on you, as sooner or later he turns on everyone close to him?

With The Mirror and the Light, Hilary Mantel brings to a triumphant close the trilogy she began with Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies. She traces the final years of Thomas Cromwell, the boy from nowhere who climbs to the heights of power, offering a defining portrait of predator and prey, of a ferocious contest between present and past, between royal will and a common man’s vision: of a modern nation making itself through conflict, passion and courage.


Sweetness and Light
Liam Pieper

India, monsoon season.

Connor, an Australian expat with a brutal past, spends his time running low-stakes scams on tourists in a sleepy beachside town. Sasha, an American in search of spiritual guidance, heads to an isolated ashram in the hope of mending a broken heart.

When one of Connor’s grifts goes horribly wrong, it sets in motion a chain of events that brings the two lost souls together – and as they try to navigate a world of gangsters, gurus and secret agendas, they begin to realise that within the ashram’s utopian community, something is deeply, deeply wrong…

Racing from the beaches of Goa to the streets of Delhi to the jungles of Tamil Nadu, Sweetness and Light is an intoxicating, unsettling story of the battle between light and dark, love and lust, morality and corruption. This is an explosive and unforgettable novel that confirms Liam Pieper’s place as one of Australia’s finest, sharpest writers.


The Good Turn (Cormac Reilly #3)
Dervla McTiernan

Police corruption, an investigation that ends in tragedy and the mystery of a little girl’s silence – three unconnected events that will prove to be linked by one small town.

While Detective Cormac Reilly faces enemies at work and trouble in his personal life, Garda Peter Fisher is relocated out of Galway with the threat of prosecution hanging over his head. But even that is not as terrible as having to work for his overbearing father, the local copper for the pretty seaside town of Roundstone.

For some, like Anna and her young daughter Tilly, Roundstone is a refuge from trauma. But even this village on the edge of the sea isn’t far enough to escape from the shadows of evil men.


Swimming in the Dark
Tomasz Jedrowski

You were right when you said that people can’t always give us what we want from them.

Poland, 1980. Anxious, disillusioned Ludwik Glowacki, soon to graduate university, has been sent along with the rest of his class to an agricultural camp. Here he meets Janusz – and together, they spend a dreamlike summer swimming in secluded lakes, reading forbidden books – and falling in love.

But with summer over, the two are sent back to Warsaw, and to the harsh realities of life under the Party. Exiled from paradise, Ludwik and Janusz must decide how they will survive; and in their different choices, find themselves torn apart.

Swimming in the Dark is an unforgettable debut about youth, love, and loss – and the sacrifices we make to live lives with meaning.


Melting Moments
Anna Goldsworthy

It is 1941. Eighteen-year-old Ruby leaves behind the family farm, her serious mother and roguish father, and heads for Adelaide. After a brief courtship, she enters into a hasty marriage with a soldier about to go to war – who returns a changed man.

In this absorbing novel, Anna Goldsworthy recreates the world of Adelaide half a century ago, and portrays the phases of a woman’s life with intimacy and sly humour. We follow Ruby as she contends with her damaged husband and eccentric in-laws. We see her experience motherhood and changing social circumstances, until, in a moving twist, a figure from the past reappears, to kindle a late-life romance.

In her captivating fiction debut, Goldsworthy evokes a woman’s life in a pre-feminist world. In this tender, funny book, she combines an Austenesque wit with Alice Munro’s feeling for human complexity.


The Recovery of Rose Gold
Stephanie Wrobel

Rose Gold Watts believed she was sick for eighteen years.

She thought she needed the feeding tube, the surgeries, the wheelchair…

Turns out her mum, Patty, is a really good liar.

After five years in prison Patty Watts is finally free. All she wants is to put old grievances behind her, reconcile with her daughter – and care for her new infant grandson. When Rose Gold agrees to have Patty move in, it seems their relationship is truly on the mend.

But Rose Gold knows her mother. Patty won’t rest until she has her daughter back under her thumb. Which is inconvenient because Rose Gold wants to be free of Patty. Forever.

Only one Watts will get what she wants.

Will it be Patty or Rose Gold?

Mother, or daughter?


The Coconut Children
Vivian Pham

Life in a troubled neighbourhood demands too much too young. But Sonny wouldn’t really know.

Watching the world from her bedroom window, she exists only in second-hand romance novels and falls for any fast-food employee who happens to spare her a glance.

Everything changes with the return of Vince, a boy who became a legend after he was hauled away in handcuffs at fourteen.

Sonny and Vince used to be childhood friends. But with all that happened in-between, childhood seems so long ago. It will take two years of juvie, an inebriated grandmother and a porn stash for them to meet again.

The Coconut Children is an urgent, moving and wise debut from a young and gifted storyteller.


The Boy from the Woods
Harlan Coben

Thirty years ago, a child was found in the New Jersey backwoods.

He had been living a feral existence, with no memory of how he got there or even who he is. Everyone just calls him Wilde.

Now a former soldier and security expert, he lives off the grid, shunned by the community – until they need him.

A child has gone missing. With her family suspecting she’s just playing a disappearing game, nobody seems concerned except for criminal attorney Hester Crimstein. She contacts Wilde, asking him to use his unique skills to find the girl.

But even he can find no trace of her. One day passes, then a second, then a third.

On the fourth, a human finger shows up in the mail.

And now Wilde knows this is no game. It’s a race against time to save the girl’s life – and expose the town’s dark trove of secrets…


The Origin of Me
Bernard Gallate

Lincoln Locke’s fifteen-year-old life is turned upside down when he’s thrust into bachelor-pad living with his father, after his parents’ marriage breaks up, and into an exclusive new school. Crestfield Academy offers Lincoln a new set of peers – the crème de la crème of gifted individuals, who also happen to be financially loaded – and a place on the swim relay team with a bunch of thugs in Speedos. Homunculus, the little voice inside his head, doesn’t make life any easier; nor does Lincoln’s growing awareness of a genetic anomaly that threatens to humiliate him at every turn.

On a search for answers to big LIFE questions, he turns to the school library, where he spies a nineteenth-century memoir, My One Redeeming Affliction by Edwin Stroud, a one-time star of Melinkoff’s Astonishing Assembly of Freaks. As Lincoln slowly reads this peculiar, life-changing book, the past reaches into his present in fascinating and alarming ways.

Ways that defy imagination…

Audacious, funny and wonderfully inventive, The Origin of Me is a song to friendship, to young love, to the joy of imagination, and to celebrating differences.


We Were Never Friends
Margaret Bearman

Lotti lives under the shadow of a genius: her father George Coates is a brilliant and celebrated Australian painter.

When Lotti meets the outcast waif Kyla at a suburban Canberra school, two worlds are set to collide. Slowly Kyla is drawn into the orbit of the Coates family.

Or is it the other way around?

As Lotti and Kyla navigate their way towards adulthood, dark secrets start to unravel, with devastating consequences…

We Were Never Friends is a compelling and powerful novel about friendship, the pursuit of a creative life and the legacies we leave behind.


The Yellow Bird Sings
Jennifer Rosner

Poland, 1941. After the Jews in their town are rounded up, Róza and her five-year-old daughter, Shira, spend day and night hidden in a farmer’s barn. Forbidden from making a sound, only the yellow bird from her mother’s stories can sing the melodies Shira composes in her head.

Róza does all she can to take care of Shira and shield her from the horrors of the outside world. They play silent games and invent their own sign language. But then the day comes when their haven is no longer safe, and Róza must face an impossible choice: whether to keep her daughter close by her side, or give her the chance to survive by letting her go…

The Yellow Bird Sings is a powerfully gripping and deeply moving novel about the unbreakable bond between parent and child and the triumph of humanity and hope in even the darkest circumstances.


You Are Not Alone
Greer Hendricks & Sarah Pekkanen

Shay Miller has three strikes against her: no job, no apartment, no love in her life. But when she witnesses a perfectly normal looking young woman about her age make the chilling decision to leap in front of an ongoing subway train, Shay realizes she could end up in the same spiral.

She is intrigued by a group of women who seem to have it all together, and they invite her with the promise: “You are not alone.” Why not align herself with the glamorous and seductive Moore sisters, Cassandra and Jane? They seem to have beaten back their demons, and made a life on their own terms – a life most people can only ever envy. They are everything Shay aspires to be, and they seem to have the keys to getting exactly what they want.

As Shay is pulled deeper and deeper under the spell of the Moore sisters, she finds her life getting better and better. But what price does she have to pay? What do Cassandra and Jane want from her? And what secrets do they, and Shay, have that will come to a deadly confrontation?

You are not alone: Is it a promise? Or a threat?


Amnesty
Aravind Adiga

Danny – Dhananjaya Rajaratnam – is an illegal immigrant in Sydney, denied refugee status after he has fled from his native Sri Lanka. Working as a cleaner, living out of a grocery storeroom, for three years he’s been trying to create a new identity for himself. And now, with his beloved vegan girlfriend, Sonja, with his hidden accent and highlights in his hair, he is as close as he has ever come to living a normal Australian life.

But then one morning, Danny learns a female client of his has been murdered. When Danny recognizes a jacket left at the murder scene, he believes it belongs to another of his clients – a doctor with whom he knows the woman was having an affair. Suddenly Danny is confronted with a choice: come forward with his knowledge about the crime and risk being deported, or say nothing, and let justice go undone? Over the course of a single day, evaluating the weight of his past, his dreams for the future, and the unpredictable, often absurd reality of living invisibly and undocumented, he must wrestle with his conscience and decide if a person without rights still has responsibilities.


Shuggie Bain
Douglas Stuart

It is 1981. Glasgow is dying and good families must grift to survive. Agnes Bain has always expected more from life. She dreams of greater things: a house with its own front door and a life bought and paid for outright (like her perfect, but false, teeth). But Agnes is abandoned by her philandering husband, and soon she and her three children find themselves trapped in a decimated mining town. As she descends deeper into drink, the children try their best to save her, yet one by one they must abandon her to save themselves. It is her son Shuggie who holds out hope the longest.

Shuggie is different. Fastidious and fussy, he shares his mother’s sense of snobbish propriety. The miners’ children pick on him and adults condemn him as no’ right. But Shuggie believes that if he tries his hardest, he can be normal like the other boys and help his mother escape this hopeless place.

Douglas Stuart’s Shuggie Bain lays bare the ruthlessness of poverty, the limits of love, and the hollowness of pride. A counterpart to the privileged Thatcher-era London of Alan Hollinghurst’s The Line of Beauty, it also recalls the work of Édouard Louis, Frank McCourt, and Hanya Yanagihara, it is a blistering debut by a brilliant novelist with a powerful and important story to tell.


Desire Lines
Felicity Volk

Arctic Circle, 2012. On a lightless day at the end of the polar winter, landscape architect Evie Waddell finds herself exhuming the past as she buries Australian seeds in a frozen mountain vault – insurance against catastrophe.

Molong, 1953. Catastrophe is all seven-year-old Paddy O’Connor has known. Shipped from institutional care in London to an Australian farm school, his world is a shadowy place where lies scaffold fragile truths and painful memories. To Paddy’s south in Canberra, young Evie is safe in her family’s embrace, yet soon learns there are some paths from which you can’t turn back; impulses and threats that she only half understands but seems to have known forever.

Blue Mountains, 1962. From their first meeting as teenagers at a country market, Paddy and Evie grow a compulsive, unconventional love that spans decades, taking them in directions neither could have foreseen.

Set against the uneasy relationship society has with its own truth-telling in history, war and politics, Desire Lines is an epic story of love and the lies we tell ourselves to survive – and a reminder that even truths which seem lost forever can find their way home.


The Salt Madonna
Catherine Noske

This is the story of a crime. This is the story of a miracle. There are two stories here.

Hannah Mulvey left her island home as a teenager. But her stubborn, defiant mother is dying, and now Hannah has returned to Chesil, taking up a teaching post at the tiny schoolhouse, doing what she can in the long days of this final year.

But though Hannah cannot pinpoint exactly when it begins, something threatens her small community. A girl disappears entirely from class. Odd reports and rumours reach her through her young charges. People mutter on street corners, the church bell tolls through the night and the island’s women gather at strange hours…And then the miracles begin.

A page-turning, thought-provoking portrayal of a remote community caught up in a collective moment of madness, of good intentions turned terribly awry. A blistering examination of truth and power, and how we might tell one from the other.


The Bell in the Lake
Lars Mytting

Norway, 1880. In the secluded village of Butangen at the end of the valley, headstrong Astrid dreams of a life beyond marriage, hard work and children. And then Pastor Kai Schweigaard comes into her life, taking over the 700-year-old stave church with its carvings of pagan deities. The two church bells were forged by her forefather in the sixteenth century, in memory of conjoined sisters Halfrid and Gunhild Hekne, and are said to have supernatural powers. But now the pastor wants to tear it down, to replace it with a modern, larger church. Though Astrid is drawn to him, this may be a provocation too far.

Talented architecture student Gerhard Schonauer arrives from Dresden to oversee the removal of the church and its reconstruction in the German city. Everything about elegant Schonauer is so different, so cosmopolitan. Astrid must make a choice: for her homeland and the pastor, or for a daunting and uncertain future in Germany.

Then the bells begin to toll…

Translated from the Norwegian by Deborah Dawkin


The Girl with the Louding Voice
Abi Dare

All you have are your words.

As the only daughter of a broke father, she is a valuable commodity. Removed from school and sold as a third wife to an old man, Adunni’s life amounts to this: four goats, two bags of rice, some chickens and a new TV. When unspeakable tragedy swiftly strikes in her new home, she is secretly sold as a domestic servant to a household in the wealthy enclaves of Lagos, where no one will talk about the strange disappearance of her predecessor, Rebecca. No one but Adunni…

As a yielding daughter, a subservient wife, and a powerless servant, fourteen-year-old Adunni is repeatedly told that she is nothing. But Adunni won’t be silenced. She is determined to find her voice – in a whisper, in song, in broken English – until she can speak for herself, for the girls like Rebecca who came before, and for all the girls who will follow.


The Night Watchman
Louise Erdrich

It is 1953. Thomas Wazhushk is the night watchman at the first factory to open near the Turtle Mountain Reservation in rural North Dakota. He is also a prominent Chippewa Council member, trying to understand a new bill that is soon to be put before Congress. The US Government calls it an ’emancipation’ bill; but it isn’t about freedom – it threatens the rights of Native Americans to their land, their very identity. How can he fight this betrayal?

Unlike most of the girls on the reservation, Pixie – ‘Patrice’ – Paranteau has no desire to wear herself down on a husband and kids. She works at the factory, earning barely enough to support her mother and brother, let alone her alcoholic father who sometimes returns home to bully her for money. But Patrice needs every penny to get if she’s ever going to get to Minnesota to find her missing sister Vera.

In The Night Watchman multi-award winning author Louise Erdrich weaves together a story of past and future generations, of preservation and progress. She grapples with the worst and best impulses of human nature, illuminating the loves and lives, desires and ambitions of her characters with compassion, wit and intelligence.


Fifty Fifty (Harriet Blue #2)
James Patterson & Candice Fox

It’s not easy being a good detective – when your brother’s a serial killer.

Sam Blue stands accused of the brutal murders of three young students, their bodies dumped near the Georges River. Only one person believes he is innocent: his sister, Detective Harriet Blue. And she’s determined to prove it.

Except she’s now been banished to the outback town of Last Chance Valley (population 75), where a diary found on the roadside outlines a shocking plan – the massacre of the entire town. And the first death, shortly after Harry’s arrival, suggests the clock is already ticking.

Meanwhile, back in Sydney, a young woman holds the key to crack Sam’s case wide open.

If only she could escape the madman holding her hostage…


The Rearranged Life of Oona Lockhart
Margarita Montimore

If you knew your future, would you change your past?

Brooklyn, 1982. Oona Lockhart is about to celebrate her 19th birthday and ring in the New Year. But at the stroke of midnight, she is torn from her friends and boyfriend, finding herself in her fifty-one-year-old body, thirty-two years into the future.

Greeted by a friendly stranger, Oona learns that on every birthday she will enter a different year of her adult life at random. Still a young woman on the inside, but ever changing on the outside, who will she be next year? Wealthy philanthropist? Nineties Club Kid? World traveller? Wife to a man she’s never met?

While Oona gets glimpses of the future and thinks she knows what’s to come, living a normal life is challenging. As she struggles between fighting her fate and accepting it, Oona must learn to navigate a life that’s out of order – but is it broken?

Margarita Montimore’s whip-smart debut is an uplifting joyride through an ever-changing world that shows us the endurance of love, the timelessness of family and what it means to truly live in the moment.


Adults
Emma Jane Unsworth

Jenny is unloved, unemployable and emotionally unfiltered. Her long-suffering friends seem sick of her and whilst her social media portrays her life as a bed of roses, it is more of a dying succulent.

Could things get any worse? Her mother is on her doorstep with a suitcase, and Jenny is about to find out…

Adults is a hilarious and heartbreaking novel about living online and trying to find yourself in real life; a hymn to the power of female friendship and an essential read for you and every woman you know.


The Temple House Vanishing
Rachel Donohue

Power. Jealousy. Desire. Twenty-five years ago, a sixteen-year-old schoolgirl and her charismatic teacher disappeared without trace…

In an elite Catholic girls’ boarding-school, the pupils live under the repressive, watchful gaze of the nuns. Seeking to break from the cloistered atmosphere, two of the students – Louisa and Victoria – quickly become infatuated with their young, bohemian art teacher, who encourages their flirtation. Then, he and Louisa vanish.

Years later, a journalist uncovers the troubled past of the school and determines to resolve the mystery of the missing pair.


Below Deck
Sophie Hardcastle 

And then, just like that, a thought bubbles inside me. It’s a beginning; a new beginning; my beginning. The beginning of the story I tell myself in order to survive.   We choose to breathe, don’t we?

Twenty-one-year-old Olivia hears the world in colour, but her life is mottled grey. Estranged from her parents, and living with her grandfather who is drowning in sadness, Oli faces the reality of life beyond university alone.

When she wakes on a boat with no recollection of how she got there, she accepts the help of two strangers who change the course of her future forever. With Mac and Maggie, Oli learns to navigate a life upon open ocean and the world flowers into colours she’s never seen before.

Four years later, Oli, fluent in the language of the sea, is the only woman among men on a yacht delivery from Noumea to Auckland. In the darkness below deck, she learns that at sea, no one can hear you scream.

Moving to London, Oli’s life at sea is buried. When she meets Hugo, the wind changes, and her memories are dust blown into shapes. Reminding her of everything.

Below Deck is about the moments that haunt us, the moments that fan out like ripples through the deep. So that everything else, becomes everything after.


House on Endless Waters
Emuna Elon

At the behest of his agent, renowned author Yoel Blum reluctantly agrees to visit his birthplace of Amsterdam to meet with his Dutch publisher, despite promising his late mother that he would never return to that city. While touring the Jewish Museum with his wife, Yoel stumbles upon a looping reel of photos offering a glimpse of pre-war Dutch Jewish life, and is astonished to see the youthful face of his beloved mother staring back at him, posing with her husband, Yoel’s older sister Nettie…and an infant he doesn’t recognise.

This unsettling discovery launches him into a fervent search for the truth, revealing Amsterdam’s dark wartime history and the underground networks which hid Jewish children away from danger – but at a cost. The deeper into the past Yoel digs, the better he understands his mother’s silence, and the more urgent the question that has unconsciously haunted him for a lifetime – Who am I? – becomes.

Part family mystery, part wartime drama, House on Endless Waters is an unforgettable meditation on identity, belonging, and the inextricable nature of past and present.


A Thousand Moons
Sebastian Barry

Even when you come out of bloodshed and disaster in the end you have got to learn to live.

Winona is a young Lakota orphan adopted by former soldiers Thomas McNulty and John Cole. Living with Thomas and John on the farm they work in 1870s Tennessee, she is educated and loved, forging a life for herself beyond the violence and dispossession of her past. But the fragile harmony of her unlikely family unit, in the aftermath of the Civil War, is soon threatened by a further traumatic event, one which Winona struggles to confront, let alone understand.

Told in Sebastian Barry’s gorgeous, lyrical prose, A Thousand Moons is a powerful, moving study of one woman’s journey, of her determination to write her own future, and of the enduring human capacity for love.  The much anticipated follow up to the acclaimed Days Without End.  


The Inland Sea
Madeleine Watts

In the early 19th century, British explorer John Oxley traversed the then-unknown wilderness of central Australia in search of water. Oxley never found it, but he never ceased to believe it was out there. The myth of the inland sea was taken up by other men, and over the years search parties walked out into the desert, dying as they tried to find it. Two centuries later, his great-great-great-great granddaughter (and our narrator) spends a final year in Sydney reeling from her own self-destructive obsessions.

She’s working part-time as an emergency dispatch operator, drinking heavily, sleeping with strangers, wandering Sydney’s streets late at night, and navigating an affair with an ex-lover. Reckless and adrift, she prepares to leave. Written with down-to-earth lucidity and ethereal breeziness, this is an unforgettable debut about coming of age in a world that seems increasingly hostile. Watts explores feminine fear, apathy and danger, building to a tightly controlled bushfire of ecological and personal crisis.


Where The Truth Lies
Karina Kilmore

She was slipping away. The further she fell, the closer the clouds seemed to come. Wispy transparent slipstreams of white. Cirrus. Pain smashed her head. Floating …

When investigative journalist Chrissie O’Brian lands a senior job at The Argus, she is desperate to escape the nightmares of her past. Her life has become a daily battle to numb the pain. But her job is something she can do better than anyone else – and the only thing that keeps the memories at bay.

A face-off on the waterfront between the unions and big business is just the kind of story to get her career back on track. But after a dockworker who confided in her turns up dead, Chrissie becomes obsessed with unravelling the truth. When a gruesome threat lands on her desk, it’s clear someone is prepared to do anything to stop her.

But who is more dangerous – a ruthless enemy or a woman pushed to the edge? Used to fighting her own demons, this is one battle Chrissie is determined not to lose.


Here We Are
Graham Swift

It is Brighton, 1959, and the theatre at the end of the pier is having its best summer season in years. Ronnie, a brilliant young magician, and Evie, his dazzling assistant, are top of the bill, drawing audiences each night. Meanwhile, Jack – Jack Robinson, as in ‘before you can say’ – is everyone’s favourite compère, a born entertainer, holding the whole show together.

As the summer progresses, the off-stage drama between the three begins to overshadow their theatrical success, and events unfold which will have lasting consequences for all their futures.

Rich, comic, alive and subtly devastating, Here We Are is a masterly piece of literary magicianship which pulls back the curtain on the human condition.


NON-FICTION

Fire Country
Victor Steffensen

Delving deep into the Australian landscape and the environmental challenges we face, Fire Country is a powerful account from Indigenous land management expert Victor Steffensen on how the revival of Indigenous fire practices, including improved ’reading’ of country and undertaking ’cool burns’, could help to restore our nation.

Victor developed a passion for traditional cultural and ecological knowledge from a young age, but it was after leaving high school that Victor met two Elders who became his mentors, particularly to revive cultural burning. Developed over many generations, this knowledge shows clearly that Australia actually needs fire – with burning done in a controlled manner – for land care and healing.

Victor’s story is unassuming and honest, written in a way that reflects the nature of yarning. And while some of the knowledge shared in his book may be unclear to western world views, there is much evidence that, if adopted, it could benefit all Australians.

For every copy sold, Hardie Grant will donate $1 to Firesticks, which empowers Indigenous fire management practitioners to revive cultural burning.


We Can’t Say We Didn’t Know
Sophie McNeill

For more than 15 years, award-winning journalist Sophie McNeill has reported on some of the most war-ravaged and oppressive places on earth, including Syria, Gaza, Yemen, West Bank and Iraq.

In We Can’t Say We Didn’t Know , Sophie tells the human stories of devastation and hope behind the headlines – of children, families and refugees, of valiant doctors, steadfast dissidents and Saudi women seeking asylum. These innocent civilians bear the brunt of the lawlessness of the current age of impunity, where war crimes go unpunished and human rights are abused. Many risk everything they know to stand up for what they believe in and to be on the right side of history, and their courage is extraordinary and inspiring. 

McNeill also examines what happens when evidence and facts become subjective and debatable, and how and why disinformation, impunity and hypocrisy now reign supreme. We can’t say we didn’t know – the question now is, what are you going to do about it?


FAST Asleep
Dr Michael Mosley with Dr Clare Bailey

Getting a good night’s sleep can improve your mood, cut your risk of depression, help you fight chronic disease, keep you slim and even improve your memory; so why is it that so many of us don’t prioritise the necessary 7-8 hours a night?

In Fast Asleep, Dr Michael Mosley brings together the latest science to explain exactly what happens to us when we sleep and why it is so important that we get enough of it. Prone to insomnia, he has taken part in numerous sleep experiments and tested every sleep remedy going. He explains why so many of us struggle with sleep, what works and what doesn’t and shares his own myth-busting programme to help you achieve a good night’s rest.

Along with fascinating case studies, 50 delicious, sleep-promoting recipes and menu plans by his wife Dr Clare Bailey, this book explains why gut health and meal times matter, explores the science of dreaming and reveals tips and tricks to help you not just to sleep better but to reduce stress levels and feel happier and healthier in general.


Sustainable Escapes
Lonely Planet

This is Lonely Planet’s guide to the world’s best eco-friendly resorts and experiences. From eco-lodges with cutting-edge sustainability initiatives to tours designed to protect wildlife and empower communities, you’ll discover remarkable places where you can feel good about spending your time and money. 

There are nearly 180 escapes to choose from, organised across five themes: Nature, Relaxation, Culture, Urban and Learning, to make it easy for you to find your perfect getaway – from tracking rare black rhinos in Namibia to a high-end private island hideaway in Indonesia, or a remastered heritage hotel in Monaco to an innovative community tourism project in Cuba.

Each escape is labelled with the key sustainability features you can enjoy while staying at the hotel or participating on the tour – whether it’s wildlife spotting, sustainable dining, conservation opportunities, homestays, expert talks and more. We also tell you what makes each retreat so special, what you can do there, what’s on its doorstep, and provide contact details to help you find out more or book a visit.


The Watermill
Arnold Zable

Ranging from remote provinces in China and Cambodia to pre- and post-war Yiddish Poland, Kurdish Iraq and Iran, and Indigenous and present-day Melbourne, Arnold Zable’s quartet of stories depicts the ebbs and flows of trauma and healing, memory and forgetting, the ancient and the contemporary. And ever-recurring journeys in search of belonging.


Cry Me a River: The Tragedy of the Murray-Darling Basin (QE 77)
Margaret Simons

The Murray-Darling Basin is the food bowl of Australia, and it’s in trouble. What does this mean for the future – for water and food, and for the people and towns that depend on it?

In this Quarterly Essay, acclaimed journalist Margaret Simons takes a trip through the basin, all the way from Queensland to South Australia. She shows that its plight is environmental but also economic, and enmeshed in ideology and identity. Her essay is both a portrait of the Murray-Darling Basin and an explanation of its woes. It looks at rural Australia and the failure of political processes over the last few generations to meet the needs of communities forced to bear the heaviest burden of change. It considers corruption and resource politics, drought and climate change.


Growing Pineapples in the Outback
Rebecca Lister & Tony Kelly

When Rebecca Lister and Tony Kelly move from Melbourne to Mount Isa to care for Rebecca’s elderly mother, Diana, they have no idea what they’ve signed up for. The isolation, sweltering heat and limited employment opportunities make settling into the mining town a challenge. While Rebecca deals with her mother’s declining health and delves into her own past, Tony takes on a new role in native title law.

However, caring for Diana – a witty, crossword-loving 92-year-old – proves to be a more enriching experience than either Tony or Rebecca thought possible. As they make deeper connections to the land and community, they find themselves flourishing in a most unexpected place.

Growing Pineapples in the Outback explores the highs and lows of caring for an ageing parent, while also celebrating the rewards of a simpler life.


Beatrix Bakes
Natalie Paull

Nat Paull’s recipes are inspired by classics the world over, but they are irreverent too, and in this book she delights in showing readers that once they get the foundations right the truest magic will come from a willingness to play (with the insurance of her many clever ideas and back-up plans in their apron pocket ). The pages are filled with authentic photography that works as a stunning visual endorsement of Natalie’s favorite treats. The recipes are divided across ten chapters: Crusts, Doughs, Pastries & Crusts; Tarts, Pies, A Crostata & a Galette; The Cake List; One in the Hand; Yeasted Bakes; Fruit-full; Creams, Custards, Fillings, Glazes and Buttercreams; and Finishing Touches. Peppered throughout are infographics, offering readers a visual (pie chart) guide to following their baking hearts.

Beatrix Bakes embraces the unparalleled joys of baking seasonally and creatively. It invites you to choose your own adventure with unique features that inspire you to mix-and-match and create magic out of even the worst baking fails and to celebrate indulgence, slowing down and being in the (sweetest) moment.


We Need to Talk About Mum and Dad
Jean Kitson

This warm and witty practical guide is a one-stop shop for information on how to support your ageing loved ones: how to protect their health and wellbeing, keep them safe and secure, and enable them to be self-determining and independent for as long as possible.

Full of expert advice and first-hand experience, this is your go-to resource to help you:

  • Navigate the bureaucratic maze while remaining sane
  • Understand what is needed for your elder’s health and wellbeing and how to get it, especially in a medical emergency
  • Survive the avalanche of legal papers and official forms
  • Choose the best place for them to live – home, retirement village, residential aged care, or granny and grandpa flat – and help your elders relocate with love and respect.

Compelled to discuss some of life’s most confronting questions, Jean shares heartfelt stories and clear facts alongside wonderful cartoons from much-loved Australian cartoonist, Patrick Cook.

We Need to Talk About Mum and Dad is a guide to what happens when we become parents of our parents.


Grounded: A Companion for Slow Living
Anna Carlie

Grounded (adjective): used to describe a person who has a good understanding of what is really important in life.

This book is your entry into a world that spins slowly and draws its inspiration from the earth, the ocean, the sun and the sky. Each turn of the page through projects organized into chapters for the four seasons will lead to discover a new way to practice slow living and weave nature into your everyday life. Build a garden bed and plant seeds. Watch your vegetable garden grow, and pluck a tomato or two to make a salad. Go on a walk in the woods, build a campfire and then read the moon. Rediscover a childlike joy of nature through over 20 projects to cook, make or do outside. 

Grounded is the ideal way to put down your devices and spend time in natural surrounds with your friends, your family and, of course, yourself.


Rust: A Memoir of Steel and Grit
Eliese Colette Goldbach

Steel is the only thing that shines in the belly of the mill…

To ArcelorMittal Steel Eliese is known as #6691: Utility Worker, but this was never her dream.

Fresh out of college, eager to leave behind her conservative hometown and come to terms with her Christian roots, Eliese found herself applying for a job at the local steel mill. The mill is everything she was trying to escape, but it’s also her only shot at financial security in an economically devastated and forgotten part of America.

In Rust, Eliese brings the reader inside the belly of the mill and the middle American upbringing that brought her there in the first place. She takes a long and intimate look at her Rust Belt childhood and struggles to reconcile her desire to leave without turning her back on the people she’s come to love. The people she sees as the unsung backbone of the nation.

Faced with the financial promise of a steelworker’s paycheck, and the very real danger of working in an environment where a steel coil could crush you at any moment or a vat of molten iron could explode because of a single drop of water, Eliese finds unexpected warmth and camaraderie among the gruff men she labors beside each day.

Appealing to readers of Hillbilly Elegy and EducatedRust is a story of the humanity Eliese discovers in the most unlikely and hellish of places, and the hope that therefore begins to grow.


Australia’s Best 100 Walks
Australian Geographic

Our free time is precious and few people have the time to survey a range of walks – it can years to find a handful of good ones. Over 150 issues and 33 years Australian Geographic has explored Australian landscapes. Our editors, writers and photographers have the energy, expertise and contacts to know where all the most exciting and exhilarating walks are to be found. In this much anticipated book, we reveal our best 100 with detailed descriptions and stunning photography to inspire both walkers and armchair travellers.

The Australian Geographic guide to Australia’s Best 100 Walks will have walkers itching to lace their boots up with this showcase of the sheer beauty and diversity of our landscapes and wildlife. With this book, walkers can set out knowing they’re going to have an incredible day outdoors. A great walk can be an exhilarating experience that will stay with you forever. Perhaps you’re stirred by endless mountain views or soothed by stepping into a living green cathedral. Maybe the challenge drives you harder and farther than you thought possible. Sometimes you’ll find yourself in the presence of a rare creature and feel a jolt of connection. There’s always magic to be found when walking but the very best walks will do all of these things. Fortunately, Australia is full of extraordinary walks – here’s our collection of the best to be found in every corner of this country.


Plants for the People: A Modern Guide to Plant Medicine
Erin Lovell Verinder

Plants are our past. Plants are our future. We are diminished if we can’t celebrate plants, properly understand their powers and harness their energy to heal ourselves.

Plants for the People is an exploration of the plant world through the eyes of a master herbalist, weaving ancient wisdom with a modern approach to plant medicine. This is a beginner’s guide to using plants to restore vitality and a general sense of wellbeing, with recipes for easy-to-make teas, tinctures, syrups, balms and baths. Throughout there are golden tips and tonics for addressing common ailments such as bloating, bad skin, lack of energy, winter coughs and colds, jangling nerves and many other present-day complaints.

An evolution of herbal-medicine books of the past, Plants for the People is a modern presentation of an ancient craft. This is plant medicine’s time to shine.


My Lucky Stroke
Sarah Brooker

Sarah Brooker was an ambitious young woman studying to be a neuroscientist. She had the world at her feet. On New Year’s Eve, 2002, an unbelievable series of events occurred: a brain aneurysm, a devastating car accident, a body broken and a mind shattered. A life was changed forever.

Several weeks later Sarah woke from a coma with no idea of who or where she was or what had happened. But thanks to an extraordinary quirk of the brain, Sarah could remember neuroscience. In fact, when doctors came to visit her during the many months she spent in hospital, Sarah assumed they were consulting her as the brain expert, not attending to her as a patient.

My Lucky Stroke is an extraordinary memoir, full of life and insight, humour and drama, a story about rebuilding a life from square one that you won’t easily forget.


Missing William Tyrrell
Caroline Overington

One minute a little boy is playing outside his foster nana’s house, the next minute, he’s gone. How can a three year old child simply disappear?

On Friday 12 September 2014, William Tyrrell – a playful three-year-old boy dressed in a fire-engine red Spider-Man suit – disappears from a quiet street in broad daylight. It’s assumed he’s lost in the nearby bushland, but despite an intensive search, he’s not found, and police start to suspect he’s been abducted. No trace of William – not a shoe, not a hair – has ever been found, but now is not the time to surrender. How can a little boy just vanish? We have to find him.

From best-selling author and Walkley Award-winning journalist, Caroline Overington, Missing William Tyrrell is a moving and compelling exploration of one of Australia’s most baffling and heartbreaking mysteries.


Anxiety
Dr Mark Cross

Consultant psychiatrist Dr Mark Cross knows a lot about anxiety. Many of his patients are sufferers, which is hardly surprising, given anxiety is the most common mental health condition in Australia, affecting up to one in four people at some point in their lives. But Mark also knows about anxiety from another perspective, because he too has suffered from anxiety all his life.

In this book, the well-known author of Changing Minds, who featured on the award-winning ABC TV series of the same name, demystifies this mental illness in his trademark warm and friendly style. He looks at causes, treatments, both medical and natural, anxiety in the workplace and more, sharing his own experiences as well as stories from others.


Now For Something Sweet
Monday Morning Cooking Club

We are always dreaming of soft, airy, pale chiffon cake, thinking about chocolate-swirled, glossy yeasted babke, imagining flaky, chewy, jammy strudel, baking almond-studded, citrus-glazed Dutch buns, frying golden, syrup-drenched coiled fishuelas, biting into hot, sugared jam-filled doughnuts, eating crisp-shelled, marshmallowy vanilla-flecked meringues, feasting on sticky, steaming, sweet butterscotch pudding and sharing it all with abundance and love…’

After three best-selling cookbooks, the irrepressible Monday Morning Cooking Club returns with a stunning fourth book, a collection of mostly sweet heirloom recipes that are as treasured as they are mouthwatering.

Now for Something Sweet is the result of an intensive search to uncover, curate and celebrate the very best, most cherished sweet recipes from the Jewish community in Australia and around the world. (Including one outstanding savoury chapter to provide delicious relief from all the sweetness.) Alongside the recipes, they recount heart-warming and poignant stories of family, friendship, community and survival.

Ranging from the straightforward to the more elaborate, these recipes are always impressive and often show stopping. From the simple passionfruit-iced coconut slab cake to a Russian yeasted kulich which is worth the day it takes to make, from quick-bake chocolate-sandwiched romany cream biscuits to the perfect vanilla slice (mille feuille) for the home cook, this book has it all. Step-by-step ‘how to’ guides for a few essential techniques provide a helping hand to those who need it, and the more complex recipes offer a challenge for those who crave it.


Truganini
Cassandra Pybus

Cassandra Pybus’s ancestors told a story of an old Aboriginal woman who would wander across their farm on Bruny Island, in south-east Tasmania, in the 1850s and 1860s. As a child, Cassandra didn’t know this woman was Truganini, and that Truganini was walking over the country of her clan, the Nuenonne.

For nearly seven decades, Truganini lived through a psychological and cultural shift more extreme than we can imagine. But her life was much more than a regrettable tragedy. Now Cassandra has examined the original eyewitness accounts to write Truganini’s extraordinary story in full.

Hardly more than a child, Truganini managed to survive the devastation of the 1820s, when the clans of south-eastern Tasmania were all but extinguished. She spent five years on a journey around Tasmania, across rugged highlands and through barely penetrable forests, with George Augustus Robinson, the self-styled missionary who was collecting the survivors to send them into exile on Flinders Island. She has become an international icon for a monumental tragedy – the so-called extinction of the original people of Tasmania.

Truganini’s story is inspiring and haunting – a journey through the apocalypse.


Plant Tribe
Igor Josifovic & Judith de Graaff

This new book by the authors of the bestselling Urban Jungle addresses the life-changing magic of living with and caring for plants. Aimed at a wider audience than typical houseplant books, each chapter combines easily digestible plant knowledge, style guidance via real home interiors, and inspiring advice for using plants to increase energy, creativity, and well-being and to attract love and prosperity.

Also included: real-world @urbanjungleblog followers’ FAQs; a section on plants and pets; and plant care for the different stages of a houseplant’s life. The focus is on using plants to raise the positive energy of every room in the house and to live happily ever after with plants.


Man Raises Boy
Rob Sturrock

Welcome to Rob Sturrock’s journey into parenting. Since the birth of his daughter, Rob has been passionate about being an active and present father, but this hasn’t always been straightforward. Struggling with stereotypes, judgement, identity and isolation while on parental leave, Rob has tried to balance supporting his wife and young children with the societal expectation of being a breadwinner for his family.

With the arrival of his son, a new set of anxieties was born. In today’s climate, how do you raise a boy? The roar of the #MeToo movement has meant that men have had to learn to listen, and to confront their masculinity and what it means to be a man. Through extensive research and interviews with dads doing it differently – including Tony Sheldon, Adam Liaw and Bernie Shakeshaft – Rob Sturrock explores a new era of fathering that balances strength and vulnerability, allowing men to voice their insecurities and uncertainties, and encouraging them to truly cherish their families.

Man Raises Boy is at once an insightful and necessary call to arms for all new fathers, a guiding hand in the maze of love, guilt, anxiety and joy in fatherhood – and an ordinary dad’s beautifully moving love letter to his son.


The Feel-Good Family Food Plan
Joanna McMillan & Melissa Clark

Packed with simple solutions, easy-to-follow advice and expert tips, The Feel-Good Family Food Plan does the thinking for you, so you get delicious home-cooked food on the table, even on the most hectic of work and school days.

  • 60 weeknight dinners the whole family will love.
  • 4 weeks of meal plans take the stress out of shopping and cooking.
  • Great ideas for getting the kids involved in the kitchen.
  • Plant-rich meals to encourage good eating habits for life.
  • Ideas for fussy eaters and getting kids to love vegies.
  • Quick healthy breakfasts, lunch boxes and snacks, for fuel on the run.
  • Tips for savvy shopping, storing and freezing.

When Life Is Not Peachy
Pip Lincolne

A warm hug in book form.

When life has taken a difficult turn, our heart is aching and we’re only just holding it together, it’s easy to question everything. Who even am I, and how will I keep going? We need someone in our corner to travel this journey with us and help keep our spirits up.

This book is a gentle guide for navigating loss, grief or other sad times – a resource both for those who are downhearted and those supporting a loved one. With thoughtful advice on dealing with friends and family; healthy tips for eating and exercise when you don’t feel like it; and a just-keep-yourself-going ‘101’ for when you’re feeling very low. It’s the bolstering force we need to feel a bit closer to ourselves, or find a bit of peace.

For years Pip Lincolne has had a dedicated readership through her blog Meet Me At Mike’s and frankie magazine. She wrote this book during some tough times of her own, in the hope that what she learned might help someone else feel a little better some day.


Grow Yourself Healthy
Beth Marshall & Marianne Majerus

Explore how gardening is good for your gut – emotionally, physically and psychologically.

There is currently a huge upsurge in interest into recent scientific research highlighting the importance gardening for health.  This focuses on the activity of gardening for mental and physical health, as well as the way that if you garden for your gut you can improve your digestion too. The microbiome is the plethora of microbes that humans host in their gut, and other cells, and which are fundamental to well-being. Recent studies link digestive health and the human microbiome to a range of health conditions such as depression and anxiety, obesity, cancer, diabetes and autism. Interest in the topic has led to an array of related popular science publications, diet and recipe books. There is currently however very little literature on how to grow produce which has high nutritional value, and which optimizes the microbial life within our digestive systems.

What types of vegetable, fruit, and herbs should we being growing to encourage beneficial internal microbes? How do we design and plan a productive garden that supports gut health?

Grow Yourself Healthy introduces relevant recent science in an accessible way, provides practical guidance on how to grow, produce and design a productive garden to optimize your health, and provides information on how to grow and store vegetables for fermentation, including select recipes for gut health.


Going Dark: The Secret Social Lives of Extremists
Julia Ebner

By day, Julia Ebner works at a counter-extremism think tank, monitoring radical groups from the outside. But two years ago, she began to feel she was only seeing half the picture; she needed to get inside the groups to truly understand them. She decided to go undercover in her spare hours – late nights, holidays, weekends – adopting five different identities, and joining a dozen extremist groups from across the ideological spectrum.

Her journey would take her from a Generation Identity global strategy meeting in a pub in Mayfair, to a Neo-Nazi Music Festival on the border of Germany and Poland. She would get relationship advice from ‘Trad Wives’ and Jihadi Brides and hacking lessons from ISIS. She was in the channels when the alt-right began planning the lethal Charlottesville rally, and spent time in the networks that would radicalise the Christchurch terrorist.

In Going Dark, Ebner takes the reader on a deeply compulsive journey into the darkest recesses of extremist thinking, exposing how closely we are surrounded by their fanatical ideology every day, the changing nature and practice of these groups, and what is being done to counter them.


The Power of Suffering 
David Roland

The Power of Suffering is psychologist David Roland’s personal investigation into the nature of human suffering. When our world is turned upside down, what does it do to us, how do we survive it, and, most importantly, how can we grow as a result? David takes the lived experience of eleven incredible people and follows them along each step of their journey from crisis through to acceptance and triumph. Within each story, David draws on his own experience of life-altering trauma and clinical research to offer insights we all can gain from.

Each life story examined is a moving testimony of the human spirit’s ability to rise and rise again – an executive tragically loses his family in a car crash and finds healing in the rehabilitation of wildlife, a teenage victim of domestic violence becomes a fierce advocate for abused women and brain-injured youth, a football superstar overcomes bigotry and dyslexia to forge a career in acting, a mother experiences the aching depth of love lost after her teenage child’s life is tragically cut short. These are but a few of the intimately told stories, all pointing to a path through the storm and beyond.

The Power of Suffering is a revelatory account of how the darkest night can lead to the most profound dawn.


When Time Stopped
Ariana Neumann

In 1941, the first Neumann family member was taken by the Nazis, arrested in German-occupied Czechoslovakia for bathing in a stretch of river forbidden to Jews. He was transported to Auschwitz. Eighteen days later his prisoner number was entered into the morgue book.

Of thirty-four Neumann family members, twenty-five were murdered by the Nazis. One of the survivors was Hans Neumann, who, to escape the German death net, travelled to Berlin and hid in plain sight under the Gestapo’s eyes. What Hans experienced was so unspeakable that, when he built an industrial empire in Venezuela, he couldn’t bring himself to talk about it. All his daughter Ariana knew was that something terrible had happened.

When Hans died, he left Ariana a small box filled with letters, diary entries and other memorabilia. Ten years later Ariana finally summoned the courage to have the letters translated and she began reading. What she discovered launched her on a worldwide search that would deliver indelible portraits of a family loving, finding meaning, and trying to survive amid the worst that can be imagined.

When Time Stopped is an unputdownable detective story and an epic family memoir, spanning nearly ninety years and crossing oceans. Neumann brings each relative to vivid life. In uncovering her father’s story after all these years, she discovers nuance and depth to her own history and liberates poignant and thought-provoking truths about the threads of humanity that connect us all.

NEW RELEASES: January & February

FICTION

American Dirt
Jeanine Cummins

Fear keeps them running. Hope keeps them alive.

Yesterday, Lydia had a bookshop.
Yesterday, Lydia was married to a journalist.
Yesterday, she was with everyone she loved most in the world.

Today, her eight-year-old son Luca is all she has left.

For him, she will carry a machete strapped to her leg.
For him, she will leap onto the roof of a high speed train.
For him, she will find the strength to keep running.

Vivid, visceral, utterly compelling, American Dirt is the first novel to explore the experience of attempting to illegally cross the US-Mexico border. Described as ‘A Grapes of Wrath for our times’ (Don Winslow) it is a story that will leave you utterly changed.


A Long Petal of the Sea
Isabel Allende

September 3, 1939, the day of the Spanish exiles’ splendid arrival in Chile, the Second World War broke out in Europe.

Victor Dalmau is a young doctor when he is caught up in the Spanish Civil War, a tragedy that leaves his life – and the fate of his country – forever changed. Together with his sister-in-law, the pianist Roser Bruguera, he is forced out of his beloved Barcelona and into exile.

When opportunity to seek refuge in Chile arises, they take it, boarding a ship chartered by the poet Pablo Neruda to the promised ‘long petal of sea and wine and snow’ over the seas. There, they find themselves enmeshed in a rich web of characters who come together in love and tragedy over the course of four generations, destined to witness the battle between freedom and repression as it plays out across the world.

A masterful work of historical fiction about hope, exile and belonging, A Long Petal of the Sea is Isabel Allende at the height of her powers.


Such a Fun Age
Kiley Reid

When Emira is apprehended at a supermarket for ‘kidnapping’ the white child she’s actually babysitting, it sets off an explosive chain of events. Her employer Alix, a feminist blogger with a ‘personal brand’ and the best of intentions, resolves to make things right.

But Emira herself is aimless, broke and wary of Alix’s desire to help. When she meets someone from Alix’s past, the two women find themselves on a crash course that will upend everything they think they know – about themselves, each other, and the messy dynamics of privilege.


Maggie’s Going Nowhere
Rose Hartley

Maggie Cotton’s life is a hot mess.

In one day, she’s dumped by her boyfriend, disinherited by her mum, and kicked out of the three-year degree she’d stretched to a decade. And that was before she received the letter saying she owed the government $70,000.

But that’s no reason to grow up, is it?

With a decrepit 1960s caravan to call home, Maggie has to prove to her mother she can survive without a safety net, stop her loyal best friend Jen from marrying a scumbag, and convince her sexy workmate Rueben that she’s not a walking disaster. For someone who’s spent her life avoiding hard work, she sure can move mountains when she’s got a little motivation – just don’t ask her to move the caravan.

Maggie’s Going Nowhere is a fierce and funny debut introducing a thoroughly relatable and offbeat heroine. If you enjoy Fleabag, you’ll adore Maggie!


Nothing to See Here
Kevin Wilson

Lillian and Madison were unlikely roommates and yet inseparable friends at their elite boarding school. Then Lillian had to leave the school unexpectedly in the wake of a scandal and they’ve barely spoken since. Until now, when Lillian gets a letter from Madison pleading for her help.

Madison’s twin stepkids are moving in with her family and she wants Lillian to be their carer. However, there’s a catch: the twins spontaneously combust when they get agitated, flames igniting from their skin in a startling but beautiful way. Lillian is convinced Madison is pulling her leg, but it’s the truth.

Thinking of her dead-end life at home, Lillian figures she has nothing to lose. Over the course of one humid, demanding summer, Lillian and the twins learn to trust each other—and stay cool—while also staying out of the way of Madison’s buttoned-up politician husband. Surprised by her own ingenuity yet unused to the intense feelings of protectiveness she feels for them, Lillian ultimately begins to accept that she needs these strange children as much as they need her. Couldn’t this be the start of the amazing life she’d always hoped for?


Long Bright River
Liz Moore

Kensington Ave, Philadelphia: 
The first place you go for drugs and sex.
The last place you want to look for your sister.

Mickey Fitzpatrick has been patrolling the 24th District for years. She knows most of the working women by name. She knows what desperation looks like and what people will do when they need a fix. She’s become used to finding overdose victims: their numbers are growing every year. But every time she sees someone sprawled out, slumped over, cold to the touch, she has to pray it’s not her sister, Kacey.

When the bodies of murdered sex workers start turning up on the Ave, the Chief of Police is keen to bury the news. They’re not the kind of victims that generate a whole lot of press anyway. But Mickey is obsessed, dangerously so, with finding the perpetrator – before Kacey becomes the next victim.


In The Clearing
J.P. Pomare

Amy has only ever known life in the Clearing. She knows what’s expected of her. She knows what to do to please her elders, and how to make sure the community remains happy and calm. That is, until a new young girl joins the group. She isn’t fitting in; she doesn’t want to stay. What happens next will turn life as Amy knows it on its head.

Freya has gone to great lengths to feel like a ‘normal person’. In fact, if you saw her go about her day with her young son, you’d think she was an everyday mum. That is, until a young girl goes missing and someone from her past, someone she hasn’t seen for a very long time, arrives in town.

As secrets of the past bubble up to the surface, this small town’s dark underbelly will be exposed and lives will be destroyed.


A Silent Death
Peter May

A silent vow
Spain, 2020. When ex-pat fugitive Jack Cleland watches his girlfriend die, gunned down in a pursuit involving officer Cristina Sanchez Pradell, he promises to exact his revenge by destroying the policewoman.

A silent life
Cristina’s aunt Ana has been deaf-blind for the entirety of her adult life: the victim of a rare condition named Usher Syndrome. Ana is the centre of Cristina’s world – and of Cleland’s cruel plan.

A silent death
John Mackenzie – an ingenious yet irascible Glaswegian investigator – is seconded to aid the Spanish authorities in their manhunt. He alone can silence Cleland before the fugitive has the last, bloody, word.

Peter May’s latest bestseller unites a strong, independent Spaniard with a socially inept Scotsman; a senseless vendetta with a sense-deprived victim, and a red-hot Costa Del Sol with an ice-cold killer.


The Land Beyond the Sea
Sharon Penman

1172. The Kingdom of Jerusalem, also known as Outremer – the land beyond the sea.

A young realm, Outremer was baptized in blood when the men of the First Crusade captured Jerusalem from the Saracens in 1099. The crusaders who stayed have adapted to an utterly new world: a landscape of blazing heat, exotic customs and enemies who are also neighbours.

Seeking retribution for the massacre in 1099, Saladin, leader of the vast Saracen army, launches a campaign to reclaim the sacred land from its current ruler, Baldwin IV. But while the young king proves to be intelligent, courageous and dedicated to the welfare and protection of his people, he lives his life under the terrible affliction of leprosy which has plagued him from an early age.

While the scheming of rival factions and fierce political deception plague the halls of the royal court, the ever-present threat from Saladin weighs heavily on the young king’s shoulders. Furthermore, there are few that Baldwin can trust, including the archbishop William of Tyre and Lord Balian d’Ibelin, a charismatic leader who has been one of the few to maintain the peace. But war is coming…


Fauna
Donna Mazza

How far would you go to save your daughter?

Set seventeen years into a very recognisable future, Fauna is an astonishing psychological drama with an incredible twist: What if the child you are carrying is not entirely human?

Using DNA technology, scientists have started to reverse the extinction of creatures like the mammoth and the Tasmanian Tiger. The benefits of this radical approach could be far-reaching. But how far will they go?

Longing for another child, Stacey is recruited by LifeBLOOD®, a company that offers massive incentives for her to join an experimental genetics program. As part of the agreement, Stacey and her husband’s embryo will be blended with edited cells. Just how edited, Stacey doesn’t really know. Nor does she have any idea how much her longed-for new daughter will change her life and that of her family. Or how hard she will have to fight to protect her.

Fauna is a transformative, lyrical and moving novel about love and motherhood, home and family-and what it means to be human.


Good Dogs Don’t Make it to the South Pole
Hans-Olaf Thyvoid

The best thing you can aspire to in this world, is company. Whether it’s for pleasure or pain, a crowning or an execution: everything is better with company. You might say it all went to hell with Mrs. Thorkildsen, but you know what? It could have been worse, because Mrs. Thorkildsen had me to keep her company. And I had her. That’s what we had in common, her and me, what bound us together. We were company.

“Look at this!” Mrs Thorkildsen says, holding the book open to a certain page, and I again feel the quick jolt of fear that sooner or later she will lose track of daily existence, when I once again have to remind her that: “Dogs can’t read.”

At a nursing home, The Major, a World War II veteran, breathes his last. Watching over him are his wife and his faithful companion, Tassen, the story’s narrator, who is, by his own admission, a couch potato and a one-man dog.

After the Major is gone, Tassen and Mrs Thorkildsen settle into their new life surrounded by books and stories of the Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen’s race with Britain’s Captain Robert F Scott to reach the South Pole in 1911. Regular visits to the local library and the bar next door provide all types of enlightenment. And Tassen and Mrs Thorkildsen provide company for each other.

However when Mrs Thorkildsen becomes ill, Tassen’s secure world begins to wobble.

Beguiling, poignant, funny and thoughtful, this utterly entertaining novel is destined to become a favourite.


The Bass Rock
Evie Wyld

Surging out of the sea, the Bass Rock has for centuries watched over the lives that pass under its shadow on the Scottish mainland. And across the centuries the fates of three women are linked: to this place, to each other.

In the early 1700s, Sarah, accused of being a witch, flees for her life.

In the aftermath of the Second World War, Ruth navigates a new house, a new husband and the strange waters of the local community.

Six decades later, the house stands empty. Viv, mourning the death of her father, catalogues Ruth’s belongings and discovers her place in the past – and perhaps a way forward.

Each woman’s choices are circumscribed, in ways big and small, by the men in their lives. But in sisterhood there is the hope of survival and new life.

Intricately crafted and compulsively readable, The Bass Rock burns bright with anger and love.


Riptides
Kirsten Alexander

One bad decision can tear your world apart…

December 1974. Abby Campbell and her brother Charlie are driving to their father’s farm on a dark country road when they swerve into the path of another car, forcing it into a tree. The pregnant driver is killed instantly.

In the heat of the moment, Abby and Charlie make a fateful decision. They flee, hoping heavy rain will erase the fact they were there. They both have too much to lose.

But they have no idea who they’ve just killed or how many lives will be affected by her death. Soon the truth is like a riptide they can’t escape, as their terrible secret pulls them down deeper by the day.


Actress
Anne Enright

This is the story of Irish theatre legend Katherine O’Dell, as told by her daughter Norah. It tells of early stardom in Hollywood, of highs and lows on the stages of Dublin and London’s West End. Katherine’s life is a grand performance, with young Norah watching from the wings.

But this romance between mother and daughter cannot survive Katherine’s past, or the world’s damage. As Norah uncovers her mother’s secrets, she acquires a few of her own. Then, fame turns to infamy when Katherine decides to commit a bizarre crime.

Actress is about a daughter’s search for the truth: the dark secret in the bright star, and what drove Katherine finally mad.

Brilliantly capturing the glamour of post-war America and the shabbiness of 1970s Dublin, Actress is an intensely moving, disturbing novel about mothers and daughters and the men in their lives. A scintillating examination of the corrosive nature of celebrity, it is also a sad and triumphant tale of freedom from bad love, and from the avid gaze of the crowd.


Grown Ups
Marian Keyes

They’re a glamorous family, the Caseys.

Johnny Casey, his two brothers Ed and Liam, their beautiful, talented wives and all their kids spend a lot of time together – birthday parties, anniversary celebrations, weekends away. And they’re a happy family. Johnny’s wife, Jessie – who has the most money – insists on it.

Under the surface, though, conditions are murkier. While some people clash, other people like each other far too much…

Everything stays under control until Ed’s wife Cara, gets concussion and can’t keep her thoughts to herself. One careless remark at Johnny’s birthday party, with the entire family present, starts Cara spilling out all their secrets.

In the subsequent unravelling, every one of the adults finds themselves wondering if it’s time – finally – to grow up?

 


The Hungry and the Fat
Timur Vermes

Refugee camps in Africa are swelling.
And Europe has closed its borders. The refugees have no future, no hope, and no money to pay the vast sums now demanded by people smugglers. But what they do have is time.

And then an angel arrives from reality T.V.
When model and star presenter Nadeche Hackenbusch comes to film at the largest of the camps, one young refugee sees a unique opportunity: to organise a march to Europe, in full view of the media. Viewers are gripped as the vast convoy moves closer, but the far right in Germany is regrouping and the government is at a loss. Which country will halt the refugees in their tracks?

The hungry and the fat.
A devastating, close-to-the-knuckle satire about the haves and have-nots in our divided world by one of Europe’s finest and most perceptive writers, in which an outlandish conceit follows a kind of impeccable logic to a devastating conclusion.

Translated from the German by Jamie Bulloch


The Last Smile in Sunder City
Luke Arnold

I’m Fetch Phillips, just like it says on the window. There are a few things you should know before you hire me:

1. Sobriety costs extra.
2. My services are confidential – the cops can never make me talk.
3. I don’t work for humans.

It’s nothing personal – I’m human myself. But after what happened, Humans don’t need my help. Not like every other creature who had the magic ripped out of them when the Coda came…

I just want one real case. One chance to do something good.

Because it’s my fault the magic is never coming back.


Apeirogon
Colum McCann

Rami Elhanan and Bassam Aramin live near one another – yet they exist worlds apart. Rami is Israeli. Bassam is Palestinian. Rami’s license plate is yellow. Bassam’s license plate is green. It takes Rami fifteen minutes to drive to the West Bank. The same journey for Bassam takes an hour and a half.

Both men have lost their daughters. Rami’s thirteen-year-old girl Smadar was killed by a suicide bomber while out shopping with her friends. Bassam’s ten-year-old daughter Abir was shot and killed by a member of the border police outside her school. There was a candy bracelet in her pocket she hadn’t had time to eat yet.

The men become the best of friends.

In this epic novel – named for a shape with a countably infinite number of sides – Colum McCann crosses centuries and continents, stitching time, art, history, nature and politics into a tapestry of friendship, love, loss, and belonging. Musical, muscular, delicate and soaring, it is a book for our times from a writer at the height of his powers.


Tyll
Daniel Kehlmann

He’s a trickster, a player, a jester. His handshake’s like a pact with the devil, his smile like a crack in the clouds; he’s watching you now and he’s gone when you turn. Tyll Ulenspiegel is here!

In a village like every other village in Germany, a scrawny boy balances on a rope between two trees. He’s practising. He practises by the mill, by the blacksmiths; he practises in the forest at night, where the Cold Woman whispers and goblins roam. When he comes out, he will never be the same.

Tyll will escape the ordinary villages. In the mines he will defy death. On the battlefield he will run faster than cannonballs. In the courts he will trick the heads of state. As a travelling entertainer, his journey will take him across the land and into the heart of a never-ending war.

A prince’s doomed acceptance of the Bohemian throne has European armies lurching brutally for dominion and now the Winter King casts a sunless pall. Between the quests of fat counts, witch-hunters and scheming queens, Tyll dances his mocking fugue; exposing the folly of kings and the wisdom of fools.

With macabre humour and moving humanity, Daniel Kehlmann lifts this legend from medieval German folklore and enters him on the stage of the Thirty Years’ War. When citizens become the playthings of politics and puppetry, Tyll, in his demonic grace and his thirst for freedom, is the very spirit of rebellion – a cork in water, a laugh in the dark, a hero for all time.


When We Were Vikings
Andrew David MacDonald

Sometimes life isn’t as simple as heroes and villains.

For Zelda, a twenty-one-year-old Viking enthusiast who lives with her older brother, Gert, life is best lived with some basic rules:

1. A smile means “thank you for doing something small that I liked.”
2. Fist bumps and dabs = respect.
3. Strange people are not appreciated in her home.
4. Tomatoes must go in the middle of the sandwich and not get the bread wet.
5. Sometimes the most important things don’t fit on lists.

But when Zelda finds out that Gert has resorted to some questionable-and dangerous-methods to make enough money to keep them afloat, Zelda decides to launch her own quest. Her mission: to be legendary. It isn’t long before Zelda finds herself in a battle that tests the reach of her heroism, her love for her brother, and the depth of her Viking strength.

When We Were Vikings is an uplifting debut about an unlikely heroine whose journey will leave you wanting to embark on a quest of your own, because after all…


Saving Missy
Beth Morrey

Prickly. Stubborn. Terribly lonely.

But everyone deserves a second chance…

Missy Carmichael’s life has become small.

Grieving for a family she has lost or lost touch with, she’s haunted by the echoes of her footsteps in her empty home; the sound of the radio in the dark; the tick-tick-tick of the watching clock.

Spiky and defensive, Missy knows that her loneliness is all her own fault. She deserves no more than this; not after what she’s done. But a chance encounter in the park with two very different women opens the door to something new.

Another life beckons for Missy, if only she can be brave enough to grasp the opportunity. But seventy-nine is too late for a second chance. Isn’t it?


My Dark Vanessa
Kate Elizabeth Russell

Vanessa Wye was fifteen-years-old when she first had sex with her English teacher.

She is now thirty-two and in the storm of allegations against powerful men in 2017, the teacher, Jacob Strane, has just been accused of sexual abuse by another former student.

Vanessa is horrified by this news, because she is quite certain that the relationship she had with Strane wasn’t abuse. It was love. She’s sure of that.

Forced to rethink her past, to revisit everything that happened, Vanessa has to redefine the great love story of her life – her great sexual awakening – as rape. Now she must deal with the possibility that she might be a victim, and just one of many.

Nuanced, uncomfortable, bold and powerful, My Dark Vanessa goes straight to the heart of some of the most complex issues our age.


NON FICTION

Denali
Ben Moon

This is the story of two friends, one relying on the other through a rough divorce, cancer at a young age, an embarrassing colostomy bag, a struggling career, and rough break ups. Eventually that friend supporting the other through his own debilitating cancer and death. This is the story of friendship and love.

This is the story of Ben Moon and his dog Denali.

After Denali succumbed to cancer, Ben and a couple of filmmaker friends made a short film as a tribute to the beast that he admits helped form him into an adult. They didn’t expect much, but the film struck an intense chord with millions of viewers capturing powerfully the connection people all over the world have with their dogs.

Denali tells the story behind the story. From the moment that Ben and Denali met in an adoption center in Oregon, through their adventures across the west in a van, through their shared struggles with a debilitating disease, Ben Moon’s memoir shows the many forms that friendship can take, and how it is one of the most powerful bonds in our lives.


Ten Feet Tall and Not Quite Bulletproof
Cameron Hardiman

Cameron Hardiman lived a life most young boys could only dream of. Every morning he put on a navy blue police flight suit, grabbed his flight helmet, and prepared to work on the police helicopter. He could be called to anything during a shift, to search for a missing child, to pull an injured driver from a wrecked car, or a dangerous sea rescue.

He saw his fair share of trauma and dealt with it like most coppers would: he quickly put each dangerous job out of his mind as soon as it was over. But one particular rescue in Bass Strait brought about a reckoning – and Cameron was never the same again.

This is the brilliantly told, white-knuckle story of one cop learning every lesson the hard way – and coming to find out that being not quite bulletproof doesn’t mean that you’re not a good cop.


Tiny Habits: The Small Changes that Change Everything
BJ Fogg

How can you make real, lasting change in your life?

Forget the latest exhausting fitness fad. Forget resolutions that last for a few weeks. Forget the guilt. Forget feeling bad. Improving your life is much easier than you think:

Try any habit,
make it tiny,
find where it fits naturally in your life
and nurture its growth.

Silicon Valley legend BJ Fogg, pioneering research psychologist, founder of the iconic Behavior Design Lab at Stanford, and one of Fortune’s ‘10 New Gurus You Should Know’, has cracked the code of habit formation. Based on twenty years’ research and used by over 60,000 people, his TINY HABITS® method reveals that the key to changing behaviour is the opposite of what you’ve always been told. It isn’t about willpower.

By focusing on what is easy to change, not what is hard; focusing on what you want to do, not what you should do, you’ll discover that creating happier, healthier lives can be easy, and surprisingly fun.


Shark Arm
Phillip Roope & Kevin Meagher

Truth can be stranger than fiction. In a Coogee aquarium in 1935 a shark coughed up a man’s tattooed arm. The authors of Shark Arm have unravelled an extraordinary tale of high-class smuggling around Sydney Harbour and police collusion that has eluded many investigations into this famous cold case.

It all started with a ruthless murder. An ex-boxer and petty police informer was efficiently disposed of, sending a ghastly warning to others. That would have been the end of it, had not a shark, in a million-to-one chance, vomited up the victim’s arm in an aquarium and shone an unwelcome light into some very dark places.

With so much at stake, the guilty closed ranks and gradually, with intimidation, money, and the murder of a mate who they feared would betray them, they re-imposed their control and the light was turned off again. The memory of those events, and the terrible fear they inspired, kept those who knew the truth silent unto the grave.

Others have written about the Shark Arm murder but Phillip Roope and Kevin Meagher, having digested the entire cold-case police file, reveal a very different story: an extraordinary tale of high-class smuggling, a frantic cover-up and the truth behind one of the most infamous cases in Australia. Except there were actually two gruesome murders…


The Plan Buy Cook Book
Gaby Chapman & Jan Petrovic

Are you always making frantic (and expensive) evening supermarket trips? Do you constantly seem to have a fridge full of food but nothing to cook? Do you feel like you’re serving up the same old meals every week?

The Plan Buy Cook Book is your guide to beating the daily dinner grind while saving time, money, food waste – and your sanity.

  • PLAN with the 4+2+1 formula (which will cut your weekly cooking time in half), along with seasonal meal-plan suggestions and handy tips on how to store food.
  • BUY with a guide to pantry and fridge essentials, how to shop and save, and eliminating food waste.
  • COOK with more than 80 simple, healthy and delicious recipes that even fussy eaters will love, from fast pad Thai to eat-and-freeze tagines, fresh BBQ salads and speedy sides.

Lose the five o’clock panic and set up for a lifetime of good food habits with The Plan Buy Cook Book.


Riding with Giants
Peter Holmes a Court

In 2011, international businessman Peter Holmes à Court left the executive world and found himself living deep in rural France with only his seven-year-old twin girls for company.

Peter was struggling as a single father in a foreign country – unsettled by the sudden move away from a traditional job, and completely baffled by the society around him. His only plan: to ride L’Etape du Tour, the challenging amateur leg of the Tour de France. In an effort to find some new friends in the community – and a bike for the race – he discovered the region’s small bicycle factory.

He was soon spending his days there: photographing his custom bike being built, meeting the locals, and learning about the rich traditions of artisan craftsmanship. Trying to enjoy the simple things and become a better father, Peter slowed down, and started to reflect seriously on history, industry and the structure of our modern economy. He and his daughters finally began to put down roots and understand the beauty and calm of a small-scale existence – and a very different approach to excellence and the well-lived life.

This is one man’s compelling, informative and funny story about the wisdom of children, the nature of work today, and the science of bicycles.


The Lotus Eaters
Emily Clements

When a stand-off with her best friend sees nineteen-year-old Emily stranded in Vietnam, she is alone for the first time and adrift in a new environment. With seemingly nothing to lose, she makes the biggest decision of her life – to stay. But Emily’s attempts to bridge a yawning loneliness spur a downward spiral of recklessness, as she hurtles from one sexual encounter to the next. It will take a truly terrifying experience for her to understand that sex is both a weapon and a wound in her battle for self-worth and empowerment.

Delicately interweaving past and present, The Lotus Eaters is a sharply written story of self-redemption from an exciting young voice in Australian memoir that dissects the patterns of blame and shame women can form around their bodies and relationships.


The Family Travel Handbook
Lonely Planet

Full of practical advice, ideas and inspiration from Lonely Planet’s parents to you, this essential guide gives you the lowdown on the wealth of amazing travel experiences around the world – and how to plan and enjoy them with your family. From navigating air and train travel to approaching unfamiliar meals and a change in routine, The Family Travel Handbook encourages curiosity, exploration and independence.

This handy trip planner brings all our expertise together into one useful guide that you can refer to for everything from ideas about exploring the great outdoors to how to pack up everything and take the kids on a round-the-world trip. It’ll help you to explore more confidently and, if you’re willing, take you out of your comfort zone to experience even more remarkable sights and activities.

We also include a section of recommendations on the best places to go, whatever sort of trip you’re after – from the top five places for infants, toddlers, tweens and teenagers, and the top five budget destinations, to our favourite family-friendly cruises, wildlife-spotting adventures and beach holidays.

Whether your family are experienced jet-setters or unsure where to start taking your kids, we’ll show you how rewarding and memorable opportunities for family travel exist at every turn.


Life Without Diabetes
Professor Roy Taylor

For centuries type 2 diabetes was regarded as an incurable, lifelong condition. Even worse, it seemed to be inevitably progressive – but no longer.

Professor Roy Taylor is one of the world’s leading experts on type 2, the man who in 2006 finally found the missing piece of the jigsaw explaining that it was actually a reversible condition. With his team of researchers at Newcastle University, he launched a series of studies leading to a remarkable, multi-million-dollar trial, which in 2019 confirmed that simple advice about diet could bring about lasting remission.

In this book, Taylor brings all the knowledge and experience of four decades of treating people with diabetes. He explains exactly what is happening in the body as type 2 diabetes develops and shows how you can live a full and healthy life beyond it.


30 Days 30 Ways to Overcome Depression
Bev Aisbett

When you’re suffering from depression, sometimes it’s as much as you can do to get out of bed, let alone read a book. But this just isn’t any other book. This is a practical day-by-day workbook, with clear, simple daily building blocks and exercises designed to help pull you out of the inertia of depression. It’s a highly approachable, concise and above all practical way to help manage depression.

Featuring all-new material from experienced counsellor and bestselling author of the self-help classics Living with IT and Taming the Black Dog, Bev Aisbett has based this book on many of the exercises she has been teaching and writing about for the past twenty years to help people manage their depression.


Older But Better, But Older
Caroline de Maigret & Sophie Mas

With playful wit, worldly advice and savvy observation, the bestselling authors of How to Be Parisian tackle the Parisian art of growing up.  Caroline de Maigret and Sophie Mas are back to amuse you, saying what you don’t expect to hear, just the way you want to hear it. But this time they reveal how they are modifying their favourite bad girl habits and mischievous mindsets now they are more ‘madam’ than ‘mademoiselle’.

These iconoclastic, bohemian Parisiennes advise on love, seduction, fashion and dating as well as family, work, living alone and accepting imperfections.

Both poignant and laugh-out-loud funny, this gorgeous, tongue-in-cheek guide astutely illuminates what it means to be a fully-fledged woman.


Home is Where You Make It
Geneva Vanderzeil

Add style and individuality to your home with DIY, even when you’re renting. Home Is Where You Make It channels the simplicity and beauty of modern living. This is your room-by-room guide to making and DIYing your own place, with hundreds of clever styling hacks, repurposing, and upstyling ideas, and easy weekend projects to create the home of your dreams.


Interval Weight Loss For Women
Dr Nick Fuller

Women are constantly bombarded with information about the latest diets – diets that can result paradoxically in weight gain and aren’t grounded in any studies. Now it’s time to cut through all those fads.

There are countless reasons women gain weight, including:

Years of dieting
Going on the contraceptive pill
Long hours at work
Pregnancy
Menopause
Ageing

In Interval Weight Loss for Women Dr. Nick Fuller explains the six key principles behind successful, sustainable weight loss. He addresses all the common pitfalls and the hurdles women face, and provides simple, effective advice based on his work with women facing similar issues.

Containing delicious recipes and meal plans, Interval Weight Loss for Women allows you, week by week, to take back control of your body – and to stop the yo-yo dieting for good.


So…You’re Having a Teenager
Sarah Macdonald & Cathy Wilcox

So, you’re having a teenager? Congratulations/commiserations.

Worried about drugs? We recommend Valium, wine and HRT.

Happy you survived the toddler tantrums? Let us introduce you to the eye roll, the cold shoulder and the incoherent mumble.

On the bright side, you’ve reduced your need for Google – your adolescent is now able to frequently correct, hector and lecture you with their strong opinion on everything. And if you feel tired, you’re not imagining it. Teen years are like dog years: for every year your teen ages, you age seven.

You need a survival guide for the testing times ahead. Friends, next-door neighbours and fellow mums of teens Sarah Macdonald and Cathy Wilcox have lived through it all and produced this straight-talking, not entirely sarcastic, informative guide to what for many parents are the most challenging – but interesting and exciting – years in the role.

From A is for Argumentative, Awkward and Angst, to Z is for Zits and Zzzzzs. Because having a toddler is a doddle.


Leadership Strategy and Tactics
Jocko Willink

Leadership Strategy and Tactics takes the guesswork out of leadership by translating theory into practical skills and manoeuvers that leaders at all levels can apply, practice and execute.

Decorated ex-US Navy SEAL officer Jocko Willink delivers hard-won leadership principles that have been tested and proven on the battlefield, in business and in life.

NOVEMBER NEW RELEASES

FICTION

End of the Ocean
Maja Lunde

In 2019, seventy-year-old Signe sets out on a hazardous voyage to cross an entire ocean in only a sailboat. She is haunted by the loss of the love of her life, and is driven by a singular and all-consuming mission to make it back to him.

In 2041, David flees with his young daughter, Lou, from a war-torn Southern Europe plagued by drought. They have been separated from their rest of their family and are on a desperate search to reunite with them once again, when they find Signe’s abandoned sailboat in a parched French garden, miles away from the nearest shore.

As David and Lou discover personal effects from Signe’s travels, their journey of survival and hope weaves together with Signe’s, forming a heartbreaking, inspiring story about the power of nature and the human spirit in this second novel from the author of the “spectacular and deeply moving” (New York Times bestselling author Lisa See) The History of Bees.


The Sun Sister (Seven Sisters #7)
Lucinda Riley

To the outside world, Electra D’Aplièse seems to be the woman with everything: as one of the world’s top models, she is beautiful, rich and famous. Yet beneath the veneer, and fuelled by the pressure of the life she leads, Electra’s already tenuous control over her state of mind has been rocked by the death of her father, Pa Salt, the elusive billionaire who adopted his six daughters from across the globe. Struggling to cope, she turns to alcohol and drugs to ease the pain, and as those around her fear for her health, Electra receives a letter from a complete stranger who claims to be her grandmother…

In 1939, Cecily Huntley-Morgan arrives in Kenya from New York to nurse a broken heart. Staying with her godmother, a member of the infamous Happy Valley set, on the shores of beautiful Lake Naivasha, she meets Bill Forsythe, a notorious bachelor and cattle farmer with close connections to the proud Maasai tribe. When disaster strikes and war is imminent, Cecily decides she has no choice but to accept Bill’s proposal. Moving up into the Wanjohi Valley, and with Bill away, Cecily finds herself isolated and alone. Until she discovers a new-born baby abandoned in the woods next to her farmhouse…

Sweeping from the frenetic atmosphere of Manhattan to the magnificent wide-open plains of Africa, The Sun Sister is the sixth installment in Lucinda Riley’s multi-million selling epic series, The Seven Sisters.


Damascus
Christos Tsiolkas

‘They kill us, they crucify us, they throw us to beasts in the arena, they sew our lips together and watch us starve. They bugger children in front of their mothers and violate men in front of their wives. The temple priests flay us openly in the streets. We are hunted everywhere and we are hunted by everyone …

We are despised, yet we grow. We are tortured and crucified and yet we flourish. We are hated and still we multiply. Why is that? You have to wonder, how is it that we not only survive but we grow stronger?’

Christos Tsiolkas’ stunning new novel Damascus is a work of soaring ambition and achievement, of immense power and epic scope, taking as its subject nothing less than events surrounding the birth and establishment of the Christian church. Based around the gospels and letters of St Paul, and focusing on characters one and two generations on from the death of Christ, as well as Paul (Saul) himself, Damascus nevertheless explores the themes that have always obsessed Tsiolkas as a writer: class, religion, masculinity, patriarchy, colonisation, exile; the ways in which nations, societies, communities, families and individuals are united and divided – it’s all here, the contemporary and urgent questions, perennial concerns made vivid and visceral.

In Damascus, Tsiolkas has written a masterpiece of imagination and transformation: an historical novel of immense power and an unflinching dissection of doubt and faith, tyranny and revolution, and cruelty and sacrifice.


The Topeka School
Ben Lerner

Adam Gordon is a senior at Topeka High School, class of ’97. His parents are psychologists, his mom a famous author in the field. A renowned debater and orator, an aspiring poet, and – although it requires a lot of posturing and weight lifting – one of the cool kids, he’s also one of the seniors who brings the loner Darren Eberheart into the social scene, with disastrous effects.

Deftly shifting perspectives and time periods, The Topeka School is a riveting story about the challenges of raising a good son in a culture of toxic masculinity. It is also a startling prehistory of the present: the collapse of public speech, the tyranny of trolls and the new right, and the ongoing crisis of identity among white men.


The Bee and the Orange Tree
Melissa Ashley

It’s 1699, and the salons of Paris are bursting with the creative energy of fierce, independent-minded women. But outside those doors, the patriarchal forces of Louis XIV and the Catholic Church are moving to curb their freedoms. In this battle for equality, Baroness Marie Catherine D’Aulnoy invents a powerful weapon: ‘fairy tales’.

When Marie Catherine’s daughter, Angelina, arrives in Paris for the first time, she is swept up in the glamour and sensuality of the city, where a woman may live outside the confines of the church or marriage. But this is a fragile freedom, as she discovers when Marie Catherine’s close friend Nicola Tiquet is arrested, accused of conspiring to murder her abusive husband. In the race to rescue Nicola, illusions will be shattered and dark secrets revealed as all three women learn how far they will go to preserve their liberty in a society determined to control them.

This keenly-awaited second book from Melissa Ashley, author of The Birdman’s Wife, restores another remarkable, little-known woman to her rightful place in history, revealing the dissent hidden beneath the whimsical surfaces of Marie Catherine’s fairy tales. The Bee and the Orange Tree is a beautifully lyrical and deeply absorbing portrait of a time, a place, and the subversive power of the imagination.


The Ocean at the End of the Lane (Illustrated edition)
Neil Gaiman
illustrated by Elise Hurst

“They say you cannot go home again, and that is as true as a knife . . .”

A man returns to the site of his childhood home where, years before, he knew a girl named Lettie Hempstock who showed him the most marvelous, dangerous, and outrageous things, but when he gets there he learns that nothing is as he remembered.

Wondrous, imaginative, impossible, and at times deeply scary, The Ocean at the End of the Lane is classic Neil Gaiman and has captured the hearts of readers everywhere. This beautiful illustrated edition features haunting, emotive artwork by renowned fine artist Elise Hurst, whose illustrations seamlessly interweave the childhood wonder and harrowing danger that infuse Gaiman’s beloved tale.


The Starless Sea
Erin Morgenstern

Zachary Ezra Rawlins is a graduate student in Vermont when he discovers a strange book hidden in the library stacks. As he turns the pages, entranced by tales of lovelorn prisoners, key collectors, and nameless acolytes, he reads something strange: a story from his own childhood. Bewildered by this inexplicable book and desperate to make sense of how his own life came to be recorded, Zachary uncovers a series of clues – a bee, a key, and a sword – that lead him to a masquerade party in New York, to a secret club, and through a doorway to a subterranean library, hidden far below the surface of the earth.

What Zachary finds in this curious place is more than just a buried home for books and their guardians – it is a place of lost cities and seas, lovers who pass notes under doors and across time, and of stories whispered by the dead. Zachary learns of those who have sacrificed much to protect this realm, relinquishing their sight and their tongues to preserve this archive, and also those who are intent on its destruction.

The author of international bestseller The Night Circus returns with a magical, timeless and wholly original love story set in a secret underground world.


Olive, Again
Elizabeth Strout

Olive, Again follows the blunt, contradictory yet deeply loveable Olive Kitteridge as she grows older, navigating the second half of her life as she comes to terms with the changes – sometimes welcome, sometimes not – in her own existence and in those around her.

Olive adjusts to her new life with her second husband, challenges her estranged son and his family to accept him, experiences loss and loneliness, witnesses the triumphs and heartbreaks of her friends and neighbours in the small coastal town of Crosby, Maine – and, finally, opens herself to new lessons about life.


CRIME / THRILLERS

You Don’t Know Me
Sara Foster

Lizzie Burdett was eighteen when she vanished, and Noah Carruso has never forgotten her. She was his first crush, his unrequited love. She was also his brother’s girlfriend.

Tom Carruso hasn’t been home in over a decade. He left soon after Lizzie disappeared under a darkening cloud of suspicion, and now he’s back for the inquest into Lizzie’s death – intent on telling his side of the story. As the inquest looms, Noah meets Alice Pryce on holiday. They fall for each other fast and hard, but Noah can’t bear to tell Alice his deepest fears. And Alice is equally stricken – she carries a terrible secret of her own. Is the truth worth telling if it will destroy everything?


Dead Man Switch
Tara Moss

She’s a woman in a man’s world …

Sydney, 1946. Billie Walker is living life on her own terms. World War II has left her bereaved, her photojournalist husband missing and presumed dead. Determined not to rely on any man for her future, she re-opens her late father’s detective agency.

Billie’s bread and butter is tailing cheating spouses – it’s easy, pays the bills and she has a knack for it. But her latest case, the disappearance of a young man, is not proving straightforward …

Soon Billie is up to her stylish collar in bad men, and not just the unfaithful kind – these are the murdering kind. Smugglers. Players. Gangsters. Billie and her loyal assistant must pit their wits against Sydney’s ruthless underworld and find the young man before it’s too late.


The Siberian Dilemma
Martin Cruz Smith

Journalist Tatiana Petrovna is on the move. Arkady Renko, iconic Moscow investigator and Tatiana’s part-time lover, hasn’t seen her since she left on assignment over a month ago. When she doesn’t arrive on her scheduled train, he’s positive something is wrong. No one else thinks Renko should be worried—Tatiana is known to disappear during deep assignments—but he knows her enemies all too well and the criminal lengths they’ll go to keep her quiet.

Renko embarks on a dangerous journey to find Tatiana and bring her back. From the banks of Lake Baikal to rundown Chita, Renko slowly learns that Tatiana has been profiling the rise of political dissident Mikhail Kuznetsov, a golden boy of modern oil wealth and the first to pose a true threat to Putin’s rule in over a decade. Though Kuznetsov seems like the perfect candidate to take on the corruption in Russian politics, his reputation becomes clouded when Boris Benz, his business partner and best friend, turns up dead. In a land of shamans and brutally cold nights, oligarchs wealthy on northern oil, and sea monsters that are said to prowl the deepest lake in the world, Renko needs all his wits about him to get Tatiana out alive.


A Minute to Midnight (Atlee Pine#2)
D
avid Baldacci

‘My sister was abducted from here nearly thirty years ago. The person who took her was never found. And neither was she. Her abductor nearly killed me. So I’m back here now trying to find the truth.’

Atlee Pine has spent most of her life trying to find out what happened that fateful night in Andersonville, Georgia. Her six-year-old twin sister, Mercy, was taken and Atlee was left for dead while their parents were apparently partying downstairs. One person who continues to haunt her is notorious serial killer, Daniel James Tor, confined to a Colorado maximum security prison. Does he really know what happened to Mercy?

The family moved away. The parents divorced. And Atlee chose a career with the FBI dedicating her life to catching those who hurt others. When she oversteps the mark on the arrest of a dangerous criminal, she’s given a leave of absence offering the perfect opportunity to return to where it all began, and find some answers. But the trip to Andersonville turns into a roller-coaster ride of murder, long-buried secrets and lies.

And a revelation so personal that everything she once believed to be true is fast turning to dust.


Blue Moon (Jack Reacher #24)
Lee
Child

Jack Reacher is back in a brand new white-knuckle read from Lee Child, creator of ‘today’s James Bond, a thriller hero we can’t get enough of’ (Ken Follett).

In a nameless city, two ruthless rival criminal gangs, one Albanian, the other Ukrainian, are competing for control. But they hadn’t counted on Jack Reacher arriving on their patch.

Reacher is trained to notice things. He’s on a Greyhound bus, watching an elderly man sleeping in his seat, with a fat envelope of cash hanging out of his pocket. Another passenger is watching too … obviously hoping to get rich quick.

As the mugger makes his move, Reacher steps in. The old man is grateful, yet he turns down Reacher’s offer to help him home. He’s vulnerable, scared, and clearly in big, big trouble.

What hold could the gangs possibly have on the old guy? Will Reacher sit back and let bad things happen? Or can he twist the situation to everyone’s benefit?

‘This is a random universe,’ he says. ‘Once in a blue moon things turn out just right.’

The odds are better with Reacher involved. That’s for damn sure.


In Darkness Visible
Tony Jones

In 2005, Marin Katich, living in Croatia under an alias, is being watched. Before the year is out, he has been assaulted, arrested, charged with serious war crimes and locked up in Scheveningen Prison in The Hague, waiting for his case to come before the International War Crimes Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia.

In Sydney, Anna Rosen, a freelance journalist, is sent photos on her computer of a man she knows to be dead-gunned down in a brutal ambush in Bosnia over a decade ago. A man she’d once loved but who had betrayed her. Is it possible that the photos really are of Marin Katich? And if so, what the hell had happened in 1992?

From Croatia to The Hague to Bosnia and Herzegovina to Sydney, Anna and Marin’s intertwined history fuels her determination to tear apart, piece-by-piece, his secrets, while continuing to keep her own.

In a dangerous pursuit of justice and revenge, navigating the murky world of national and international secret agencies and those who would still be warlords, Anna fights for what she believes in and for those she loves.

Tony Jones, one of Australia’s most admired journalists, blurs the lines between fiction and political reality, creating a page-turning, intriguing and gripping thriller.


NON-FICTION

Tell Me Why
Archie Roach

No one has lived as many lives as Archie Roach – stolen child, seeker, teenage alcoholic, lover, father, musical and lyrical genius, and leader – but it took him almost a lifetime to find out who he really was.

Roach was only two years old when he was forcibly removed from his family. Brought up by a series of foster parents until his early teens, his world imploded when he received a letter that spoke of a life he had no memory of.

In this intimate, moving and often shocking memoir, Archie’s story is an extraordinary odyssey through love and heartbreak, family and community, survival and renewal – and the healing power of music. Overcoming enormous odds to find his story and his people, Archie voices the joy, pain and hope he found on his path through song to become the legendary singer-songwriter and storyteller that he is today – beloved by fans worldwide.

Tell Me Why is a stunning account of resilience and the strength of spirit – and of a great love story.


Eat More Vegan
Luke Hines

Luke Hines is well known for his creative and healthy paleo takes on everyday favourites. This new book is filled with delicious recipes – all completely plant-based and gluten and grain free. Regardless of your food philosophy, we can all agree that we need to eat more plants and in Eat More Vegan Luke shares nutritious recipes that are packed with flavour and full of vibrant colour. This book is a celebration of amazing, generous and abundant vegan food – real food, there’s not a packet ingredient in sight!

There are flavourful and hearty breakfasts, such as herby carrot fritters with dream cheese, whole roasted hemp-crusted mushrooms and zucchini carpaccio with fresh lemon and olives. Salads, soups and sautés for any time of the day, such as amazing avocado salad with macadamia pesto, pumpkin soup with macadamia cream & crispy pumpkin skin shards, and spicy peanut stew.

More substantial roasts, bakes and barbecues, such as loaded hasselback sweet potatoes, sticky eggplant, spaghetti with sunflower bolognese and a hemp burger with the lot. And sweets to finish off, such as the ultimate chocolate mousse with roasted hazelnut crumb, blueberry bounty bars, and crunchy hazelnut butter bites.


Please, Gamble Irresponsibly
Titus O’Reily

Australians lose more money gambling than any other country. But how did we get here? In his inimitable, hilarious style, sports historian Titus O’Reily charts the rise, fall and rise of sport gambling in Australia.

We’ll gamble on anything, from two flies crawling up a wall to less important things like federal elections. And thanks to the internet, phones and gambling-tax loving governments, these days Australians can indulge their love of a punt no matter what they’re doing. Aussies could be at the birth of a child or performing open-heart surgery and still put a bet on.

It wasn’t always this easy. Once, you could only gamble on sport illegally. Which, it turns out, was actually also pretty easy. But over the last thirty years gambling on sport has been legalised, first slowly and then very quickly. Now almost every ad on TV is about sport betting, and even some of the players are getting in on the wagering.

Please, Gamble Irresponsibly traces the history of gambling in Australia from horseracing in the colonial era, through the rise of SP bookies and organised crime, to the commercialisation of the industry and its impact on communities and the integrity of sport. With billions of dollars involved, what are the odds of putting the genie back in the bottle?


Against All Odds
Craig Challen & Richard Harris

‘I just want to warn you. You’re going to dive to the end of the cave. You’re going to see these kids. They’re all looking healthy and happy and smiley. Then, you’re going to swim away, and they’re probably all going to die.’

In June 2018, for seventeen days, the world watched and held its breath as the Wild Boar soccer team were trapped deep in a cave in Thailand. Marooned beyond flooded cave passages after unexpected rains, they were finally rescued, one-by-one, against almost impossible odds, by an international cave-diving team which included Australians Dr Richard Harris and Dr Craig Challen.

These two men were chosen for their medical expertise and cave diving knowledge, but this dangerous rescue asked so much more of them. They had to remain calm under extreme pressure and intense scrutiny, adapt to constantly changing circumstances and importantly, build trust among the rescue team and with the young boys and their coach, whose lives were in their hands. Here is the story of these two Australian men who became international heroes – it is a story of determination, cunning and triumph that will long be remembered.


Dr Karl’s Random Road Trip Through Science
Karl Kruszelnicki

In this, his 45th book, Dr Karl goes full kolour, with brilliant and funny illustrations to match his dress sense. So take a technikolour trip through science with the intrepid Dr Karl, Australia’s favourite science guru.

Q: HOW MANY DR KARL BOOKS ARE THERE IN THE UNIVERSE?

A: MORE THAN A MILLION!

Dr Karl is on a mission to track down Awe and Wonder in the Universe.

Why do wombats poo cubes?

What nearly destroyed humanity on Halloween 2015?

How do you use an incinerating toilet?

Find out why we’ve sent a spacecraft with Dr Karl’s name on it to kiss the Sun, whether cannibalism is nutritious, and the answer to the Biggeset Question of All – why does spaghetti always break into three pieces? Plus a whole lot more.

So strap in and get ready for a random ride through the Universe. Who knows where you’ll end up!


The Golden Era
Rod Laver

From the 1950s to the 1970s, Australia was the world’s tennis superpower, producing players who dominated amateur grand slam tournaments, the Davis Cup and the professional circuit,and none was more successful, famous or influential than Rod Laver, whose two singles Grand Slams – winning the Australian, French, Wimbledon and United States championships in a calendar year – have never been equalled.

The Golden Era is Rod’s deeply personal account of those great years. As a participant and eye-witness, he captures the excitement and drama of the great wins, and gives us genuine insight into the band of supremely talented Australian champions who balanced playing hard with a legendary sportsmanship.Written with all of Rod’s peerless tennis knowledge, and including key interviews with Frank Sedgman, Ken Rosewall, the late Lew Hoad, Neale Fraser, Mal Anderson, Ashley Cooper, Roy Emerson, Fred Stolle, John Newcombe and Margaret Court, The Golden Era is the definitive story of the two decades of Australian tennis domination that will almost certainly never be repeated.


The Two Good Cook Book: Recipes. Stories. Community
Two Good Co.

It includes essays on food memories and the power of food from four of Australia’s finest contemporary authors – Charlotte Wood, Markus Zusak, Liane Moriarty and Thomas Keneally – paintings by artist Zoe Young, and more than 60 recipes by leading Australian and international chefs for simple nutritious family meals and celebratory feasts.

From an organic soup kitchen in Kings Cross, social enterprise Two Good has expanded to sell restaurant quality salads and soups designed by some of Australia’s leading chefs, delivered in distinctive glass jars. With every meal sold another is donated to a woman in a safe house. Two Good also provides training and employment pathways for domestic violence survivors.

Words by Liane Moriarty, Thomas Keneally, Charlotte Wood, Markus Zusak.

Recipes by Neil Perry, Maggie Beer, Ben Shewry, Nigella Lawson, Peter Gilmore, Yotam Ottolenghi, Skye Gyngell, Greg Doyle, Colin Fassnidge, Kylie Kwong, Pasi Petanen, Jackie Middleton, Danielle Alvarez, Chris Manfield, Analiese Gregory, Sarah Wilson, George Calombaris, Mitch Orr, Mat Lindsay, Hetty McKinnon, Matt Wilkinson, Jacqui Challinor, Mike McEnearney, Hamish Ingham, O’Tama Carey, Jonathan Barthelmess, Matt Moran.


Chika
Mitch Albom

Chika Jeune was born three days before the devastating earthquake that decimated Haiti in 2010. She spent her infancy in a landscape of extreme poverty, and when her mother died giving birth to a baby brother, Chika was brought to The Have Faith Haiti Orphanage that Albom operates in Port Au Prince.

With no children of their own, the forty-plus children who live, play, and go to school at the orphanage have become family to Mitch and his wife, Janine. Chika’s arrival makes a quick impression. Brave and self-assured, even as a three-year-old, she delights the other kids and teachers. But at age five, Chika is suddenly diagnosed with something a doctor there says, “No one in Haiti can help you with.”

Mitch and Janine bring Chika to Detroit, hopeful that American medical care can soon return her to her homeland. Instead, Chika becomes a permanent part of their household, and their lives, as they embark on a two-year, around-the-world journey to find a cure. As Chika’s boundless optimism and humor teach Mitch the joys of caring for a child, he learns that a relationship built on love, no matter what blows it takes, can never be lost.

Told in hindsight, and through illuminating conversations with Chika herself, this is Albom at his most poignant and vulnerable. Finding Chika is a celebration of a girl, her adoptive guardians, and the incredible bond they formed—a devastatingly beautiful portrait of what it means to be a family, regardless of how it is made.


We Are Here
Meg Mundell

How can you feel anchored when you have no place to call your own?

Australia has a large shadow population of people who experience homelessness – whether couch-surfing, staying in a refuge, boarding house or caravan park, or sleeping rough. Too often they are dismissed or blamed. They are spoken for, and about, but rarely get to speak for themselves.

Edited by former BIG ISSUE deputy editor Meg Mundell, We Are Here is a vibrant and moving collection of true stories showcasing the creative talents of people who have known homelessness. From cold city doorways to lonely bush camps, from a borrowed couch to a discreetly parked car, from dodgy boarding houses to the humid hell of Manus Island, these powerful, defiant and illuminating stories will make every reader question their place in the world. And the kind of place they want the world to be.

All profits from the sale of this book will be donated to charities that work with people experiencing homelessness. The writers and visual artists featured in We Are Here have been paid for their contributions.


Who Owns History?
Geoffrey Roberston

Hard on the heels of his best-selling autobiography Rather His Own Man, one of Australia’s foremost public intellectuals turns his mind to one of the most important contemporary questions that divides the world of art and culture: the restitution of heritage treasures removed in earlier times from subjugated peoples who now want them back.

Taking his cue from Cicero, the great Roman barrister, Geoffrey Robertson argues that justice requires the return not only of the ‘Elgin’ Marbles to Greece, but of many looted antiquities on display in the museums of Britain, Europe and America. He argues that the Gweagal Shield – dropped when Cook shot at Aboriginals in Botany Bay in 1770 – should be returned to Australia from the British Museum. He wants the government to acquire the hull of HMS Endeavour recently located off Rhode Island. He has located Arthur Phillip’s tombstone for Yemmerrawanne, the first Australian expatriate, in a South London churchyard, and he wants to bring it back.

Robertson’s judgement is uncompromising: cultural heritage belongs to the people of whose history it is a part, unless its return would be attended by danger to the artwork itself. And since the movement for the restitution of cultural property is based on human rights, governments that want it back must show respect for the rights of the peoples on whose behalf they make the claim.

Who Owns History? not only delves into the crucial debate over the Marbles, but examines how the past can be experienced by everyone, as well as by the people of the country of origin.


Rick Stein’s Secret France
Rick Stein

Over fifty years ago Rick Stein first set foot in France. Now, he returns to the food and cooking he loves the most … and makes us fall in love with French food all over again.

Rick’s meandering quest through the byways and back roads of rural France sees him pick up inspiration from Normandy to Provence. With characteristic passion and joie de vivre, Rick serves up incredible recipes: chicken stuffed with mushrooms and Comté, grilled bream with aioli from the Languedoc coast, a duck liver parfait bursting with flavour, and a recipe for the most perfect raspberry tart plus much, much more.

Simple fare, wonderful ingredients, all perfectly assembled; Rick finds the true essence of a food so universally loved, and far easier to recreate than you think.


Big Sister, Little Sister, Red Sister
Jung Chang

The best-known modern Chinese fairy tale is the story of three sisters from Shanghai, who for most of the twentieth century were at the centre of power in China. It was sometimes said that ‘One loved money, one loved power and one loved her country’, but there was far more to the Soong sisters than these caricatures. As China battled through a hundred years of wars, revolutions and seismic transformations, each sister played an important, sometimes critical role, and left an indelible mark on history.

Red Sister, Ching-ling, married Sun Yat-sen, founding father of the Chinese republic, and later became Mao’s vice-chair. Little Sister, May-ling, was Madame Chiang Kai-shek, first lady of the pre-Communist Nationalist China and a major political figure in her own right. Big Sister, Ei-ling, was Chiang’s unofficial main adviser. She made herself one of China’s richest women – and her husband Chiang’s prime minister. All three sisters enjoyed tremendous privilege and glory, but also endured constant attacks and mortal danger. They showed great courage and experienced passionate love, as well as despair and heartbreak. The relationship between them was highly charged emotionally, especially once they had embraced opposing political camps and Ching-ling dedicated herself to destroying her two sisters’ world.

Big Sister, Little Sister, Red Sister is a gripping story of love, war, exile, intrigue, glamour and betrayal, which takes us on a monumental journey, from Canton to Hawaii and New York, from exiles’ quarters in Japan and Berlin to secret meeting rooms in Moscow, and from the compounds of the Communist elite in Beijing to the corridors of power in democratic Taiwan. In a group biography that is by turns intimate and epic, Jung Chang reveals the lives of three extraordinary women who helped shape the history of twentieth-century China.


James Cook
Peter FitzSimons

The name Captain James Cook is one of the most recognisable in Australian history – an almost mythic figure who is often discussed, celebrated, reviled and debated. But who was the real James Cook?

This Yorkshire farm boy would go on to become the foremost mariner, navigator and cartographer of his era, and to personally map a third of the globe. His great voyages of discovery were incredible feats of seamanship and navigation. Leading a crew of men into uncharted territories, Cook would face the best and worst of humanity as he took himself and his crew to the edge of the known world – and beyond.

With his masterful storytelling talent, Peter FitzSimons brings James Cook to life. Focusing on his most iconic expedition, the voyage of the Endeavour, where Cook first set foot on Australian and New Zealand soil, FitzSimons contrasts Cook against another figure who looms large in Australasian history: Joseph Banks, the aristocratic botanist. As they left England, Banks, a rich, famous playboy, was everything that Cook was not. The voyage tested Cook’s character and would help define his legacy.

Now, 240 years after James Cook’s death, FitzSimons reveals what kind of man James was at heart. His strengths, his weaknesses, his passions and pursuits, failures and successes.

James Cook reveals the man behind the myth.


Surf Like a Girl
Carolina Amell

Whether they’re threading a barrel or shredding a swell, these amazing women are making enormous waves in the world of surfing.

If you thought surfing was a male-dominated sport, think again. The thirty women surfers profiled in this thrilling collection can rip a wave with the best of them. Hailing from all over the world, each surfer is featured in spectacular photography and with their own inspirational words. There’s American professional surfer Lindsay Steinriede on how her father’s death has inspired her career; French board shaper Valerie Duprat on how she got her start “sculpting foam”; Conchita Rossler, founder of Mooana Retreat in Portugal, on connecting mind, body, and spirit; and Australian photographer Cait Miers on empowering women.

You’ll also meet surfers who are over sixty, who surf while pregnant, who captain boats, teach yoga, and make movies. Breathtaking photography captures these women from every angle, on and off the waves, in some of the world’s most visually stunning locations. The perfect gift for surfing enthusiasts, this unique compilation of stunning pictures and hard-won wisdom proves that the thrill of catching a wave, riding it, and kicking out belongs to everyone.


The Commons
Matthew Evans

We all want more air in our lives. Brighter skies, slower days, more time for growing, for cooking, for family. In The Commons, a book inspired by the hit SBS television show Gourmet Farmer, Matthew Evans captures Fat Pig Farm’s year of growing, cooking and feasting. It’s part how-to, part evocative diary, part cookbook (with more than 100 recipes).

It’s the perfect inspiration for those about to embark on a simpler life, a handy reference for those who already have done just that, and a vicarious solution for those who just want to dream the dream without leaving home.


The History of the World in Fifty Dogs
Mackenzi Lee

Most dog lovers know Fidoand Laika, but how about Martha, Paul McCartney’s Old English Sheepdog? Or Peritas, Alexander the Great’s trusted canine companion?

As long as there have been humans, those humans have had beloved companions—their dogs. From the ancient Egyptians mummifying their pups, to the Indian legend of the king who refused to enter the afterlife unless his dog was allowed there too, to the modern meme and popularity of terms like the corgi sploot, humans are undeniably obsessed with their dogs.

Told in short, illustrated essays that are interspersed with both historical and canine factoids, The History of the World in Fifty Dogs brings to life some of history’s most memorable moments through the stories of the dogs that saw them happen.


More
Matt Preston

Maybe you want to eat more vegetables, or less meat, or try cooking some tasty vegan meals to broaden your repertoire and still put a broad smile on the faces of those you are feeding?

Maybe you want save money or the environment by eating more plant-based meals, or maybe you just want to keep the vegan or vego in the family happy at dinnertime without having to cook two meals?

Maybe you just want to enjoy a meat-free Monday every so often and don’t want to feel like you’re missing out?

Here are over 100 recipes full of vibrant colours and flavours that celebrate the pure, unadulterated pleasure that food can give you. All the recipes are vegetarian or vegan – but if you decide you’d like to add a little bacon or a slab of fish, we’re not going to wag a finger. We’ve even included a separate cooking guide for your meaty add-ons.

Gone are the grey-meat-and-potatoes menus of the past. Each of these recipes capture the happiness that good food can bring. More combines Matt’s passion for simple, hearty recipes with his love of the humble veggie to bring the whole family to the table for a delicious meal.


Adam Spencer’s Numberland
Adam Spencer

Australia’s funniest mathematician returns in 2019 with more rollicking romps through the world of science, technology, numbers and all things nerdy.

This terrific new fully illustrated title follows on from Adam’s bestselling Big Book of Numbers (2014); World of Numbers (2015), Time Machine (2016), The Number Games (2017), and Top 100 (2018), and is packed full of fascinating facts, tantalising trivia, brainbusting number puzzles, and much much more.


Bowie’s Books
John O’Connell

Three years before he died, David Bowie made a list of the one hundred books that had transformed his life – a list that formed something akin to an autobiography. From Madame Bovary to A Clockwork Orange, the Iliad to the Beano, these were the publications that had fuelled his creativity and shaped who he was.

In Bowie’s Books, John O’Connell explores this list in the form of one hundred short essays, each offering a perspective on the man, performer and creator that is Bowie, his work as an artist and the era that he lived in.

Bowie’s Books is much more than a list of books you should read in your lifetime: it is a unique insight into one of the greatest minds of our times, and an indispensable part of the legacy that Bowie left behind.


Just Desserts
Charlotte Ree

You’d butter believe this is the only baking book you’ll need this Christmas!

Instagram sensation Charlotte Ree is famous for her simple and delicious sweets … and her love of puns. Her easy, user-friendly creations are designed to taste amazing, rather than just look pretty (though pretty they most certainly are!).

Just Desserts showcases 30 of Charlotte’s most popular and delicious cake, biscuit, slice and dessert recipes in one outrageously gorgeous little package. Featuring essentials, such as chocolate brownies, shortbread caramel slice and chocolate-chip cookies through to show stoppers, such as layered berry pavlova and chocolate ganache & blackberry bundt, Just Desserts is the ideal gift for the baker and sweet-lover in your life – even if that’s YOU!


Your Own Kind of Girl
Clare Bowditch

Clare Bowditch has always had a knack for telling stories. Through her music and performing, this beloved Australian artist has touched hundreds of thousands of lives. But what of the stories she used to tell herself? That ‘real life’ only begins once you’re thin or beautiful, that good things only happen to other people.

Your Own Kind of Girl reveals a childhood punctuated by grief, anxiety and compulsion, and tells how these forces shaped Clare’s life for better and for worse. This is a heartbreaking, wise and at times playful memoir. Clare’s own story told raw and as it happened. A reminder that even on the darkest of nights, victory is closer than it seems.

With startling candour, Clare lays bare her truth in the hope that doing so will inspire anyone who’s ever done battle with their inner critic. This is the work of a woman who has found her true power – and wants to pass it on. Happiness, we discover, is only possible when we take charge of the stories we tell ourselves.


Tea and Scotch with Bradman
Roland Perry

In 1995, journalist and author Roland Perry wrote to Sir Donald Bradman requesting an interview for a biography he was planning of the great cricketer. Surprisingly, the Don agreed. It was the start of a conversation that continued for years, during which the real Bradman shone, not only as a great sportsman but musician, brilliant thinker and humourist with a fondness for tea and a Scotch or two.

In Tea and Scotch with Bradman, Perry paints an intimate and revealing portrait of the man many regard as the greatest Australian cricketer of all time.


Acid for the Children
Flea

The strange tale of a boy named Flea starts in Rye, NY. It was all very normal. But soon his parents divorced and his mother Patricia remarried a jazz musician. Flea’s stepfather frequently invited musicians to his house for jam sessions which sparked Flea’s interest in music. The family moved to Los Angeles, where Flea became fascinated with the trumpet, idolizing musicians like Miles, Dizzy, and Louis.

But the family soon fell apart, “I was raised in a very violent, alcoholic household,” Flea later said. “I grew up being terrified of my parents, particularly my father figures. It caused [me] a lot of trouble later in life.” He began smoking weed at 13, and became a daily user of harder drugs. He was on the streets by 14 and soon after, met another social outcast and drug user named Anthony Kiedis. They form a band that would become the Red Hot Chili Peppers.

Acid For The Children is pure, uncut Flea, with nothing left unsaid.


Australian Designers at Home
Jenny Rose-Innes

Australian Designers at Home invites readers into the homes of 20 of the country’s leading names in interior design. With unfettered access to their most private retreats, we see where the best of the industry express their true, unfiltered selves. Jenny Rose-Innes celebrates the designers who have inspired her, sharing their histories and houses, as well as professional insights and practical tips on decorating. This book provides an invaluable resource for designers, decorators and interiors enthusiasts alike.

Richly illustrated throughout with stunning colour photography by Simon Griffiths, Australian Designers at Home takes readers on an intimate journey, revealing how the most influential designers decorate their own houses. Find out what home means from the people who create them for a living.


Between the Stops
Sandi Toksvig

Between the Stops is a sort of a memoir, my sort. It’s about a bus trip really, because it’s my view from the Number 12 bus (mostly top deck, the seat at the front on the right), a double-decker that plies its way from Dulwich, in South East London, where I was living, to where I sometimes work – at the BBC, in the heart of the capital. It’s not a sensible way to write a memoir at all, probably, but it’s the way things pop into your head as you travel, so it’s my way’.

From London facts including where to find the blue plaque for Una Marson, ‘The first black woman programme maker at the BBC’, to discovering the best Spanish coffee under Southwark’s railway arches; from a brief history of lady gangsters at Elephant and Castle to memories of climbing Mount Sinai and, at the request of a fellow traveller, reading aloud the Ten Commandments; from the story behind Pissarro’s painting of Dulwich Station to performing in Footlights with Emma Thompson; from painful memoires of being sent to Coventry while at a British boarding school to thinking about how Wombells Travelling Circus of 1864 haunts Peckham Rye;from anecdotes about meeting Prince Charles, Monica Lewinsky and Grayson Perry to Bake Off antics; from stories of a real and lasting friendship with John McCarthy to the importance of family and the daunting navigation of the Zambezi River in her father’s canoe, this Sandi Toksvig-style memoir is, as one would expect and hope, packed full of surprises.

A funny and moving trip through memories, musings and the many delights on the Number 12 route, Between the Stops is also an inspiration to us all to get off our phones, look up and to talk to each other because as Sandi says: ‘some of the greatest trips lie on our own doorstep’.


The Man in the Red Coat
Julian Barnes

In the summer of 1885, three Frenchmen arrived in London for a few days’ shopping. One was a Prince, one was a Count, and the third was a commoner with an Italian name, who four years earlier had been the subject of one of John Singer Sargent’s greatest portraits. The commoner was Samuel Pozzi, society doctor, pioneer gynaecologist and free-thinker – a rational and scientific man with a famously complicated private life.

Pozzi’s life played out against the backdrop of the Parisian Belle Epoque. The beautiful age of glamour and pleasure more often showed its ugly side: hysterical, narcissistic, decadent and violent, a time of rampant prejudice and blood-and-soil nativism, with more parallels to our own age than we might imagine.

The Man in the Red Coat is at once a fresh and original portrait of the Belle Epoque – its heroes and villains, its writers, artists and thinkers – and a life of a man ahead of his time. Witty, surprising and deeply researched, the new book from Julian Barnes illuminates the fruitful and longstanding exchange of ideas between Britain and France, and makes a compelling case for keeping that exchange alive.


Icons of Footy
Kevin Sheedy

Footy legend Kevin Sheedy crosses team alliances to profile the 21 most iconic Aussie Rules players and coaches of his lifetime. He also sits down for interviews with nine icons he has long admired and who don’t normally (for various reasons) have their stories told. Packed full of wisdom and wit, insight and memories, Icons of Footy is a treasure-trove for football fans of all tribes and ages, from one of the most unique and colourful characters in Australian sport.

This beautifully-packaged hardback includes: Gary Ablett Senior, Allen Aylett, Ron Barassi, Kevin Bartlett, Malcolm Blight, Barry Cable, Wayne Carey, Alastair Clarkson, Jason Dunstall, Graham Farmer, Lance Franklin, Adam Goodes, Royce Hart, Francis Hughes, James Hird, Alex Jesaulenko, Leigh Matthews, Kevin Murray, John Nicholls, Barrie Robran, Michael Tuck.


In An Australian Light
Thames & Hudson

Australia is drenched in a light that is different from anywhere else in the world. A light so distinctive, we know it can only be of one place.

Imagined as a celebration of the particular beauty of Australian light, this generous publication roams the country, from rugged coastline to arid outback, to reveal how light shapes our wide, brown land. Wind-etched rocks, patterns in sand. Teal oceans. Surfers, slick in their wetsuits against the morning sun. A beach filled with people. A beach with no people. Rockpools. High-rise buildings against sand and sea. Golden sunsets over city skylines. Rays reaching through forest branches to frosted ground. Paddocks muted by mist, trees laden with luminous snow. The variation in the fall of light on our landscape seems limitless.

With an introduction by a galactic astrophysicist, In an Australian Light reminds us of the myriad ways we experience light in this vast and diverse land.


The Lost Boys
Paul Byrnes

In the First World War of 1914–1918, thousands of boys across Australia and New Zealand lied about their age, forged a parent’s signature and left to fight on the other side of the world. Though some were as young as thirteen, they soon found they could die as well as any man. Like Peter Pan’s lost boys, they have remained forever young. These are their stories.

This extraordinary book captures the incredible and previously untold stories of forty Anzac boys who fought in the First World War, from Gallipoli to the Armistice. Featuring haunting images of the boys taken at training camps and behind the lines, these tales are both heartbreaking and rousing, full of daring, ingenuity, recklessness, random horror and capricious luck.

A unique perspective on the First World War, The Lost Boys is military history made deeply personal, a powerful homage to youthful bravery and a poignant reminder of the sacrifice of war.


Perspective
Ellyse Perry

Ellyse Perry is among the all-time cricket greats – she’s the only player, female or male, to represent Australia in both cricket and soccer World Cups, with her international debuts in both sports at age 16, and was the youngest ever Test debut at the age of 17 … and she is just getting started.

From the lessons of a high-performance athlete’s career to appreciating the small things in life – this inspiring illustrated book, for fans of Ellyse Perry, features stories and reflections from her childhood and career on the themes of dreaming, belief, work, resilience, acceptance, opportunity, balance and perseverance – and their importance in everything we do.

Perspective is an empowering book with a unique view of what it is to be an elite athlete from one of Australia’s most admired sports stars.


Iconic: Modern Australian Houses 1950-2000
McCartney

Iconic: Modern Australian Houses 1950–2000 showcases, in a fresh, new and collectible edition, the best residential projects from the previously published works 50/60/70 and 70/80/90 and which formed successful exhibitions shown at the Museum of Sydney. Completely redesigned in a new format, with revised introduction, this classic will find audiences both new to and familiar with the gems of Australian modernist architecture.

Featuring houses from: Harry Seidler, Peter Muller, Roy Grounds, Peter McIntyre, Russell Jack, Robin Boyd, McGlashan Everist, Enrico Taglietti, Neville Gruzman, Bruce Rickard, Hugh Buhrich, Ian McKay, Iwan Iwanoff, Ian Collins, Richard Leplastrier, Glenn Murcott, Barrie Marshall, Ken Woolley, Lovell Chen, Wood Marsh, Andresen O’Gorman, Durbach Block, Sean Godsell, Stutchbury and Harper, Donovan Hill, John Wardle.

2019 Children’s Book Week and Story Writing Competition Winners

We were delighted to kick off our celebrations for Children’s Book Week yesterday with a visit from the lovely Jane Godwin and the announcement of our Story Competition Winners for 2019.  What an absolutely bumper crowd we had?!  Thanks so much to everyone who was able to come down and enjoy the afternoon’s festivities.

CBW2019

Jane Godwin very generously spoke with us about her own writing approach and ideas and gave the kids her Top 10 Tips for Young Writers, which are a great reference for everyone putting their entries together for next year!

Story Competition Winners

We had more than 200 entries this year from Prep through to Year 12 – it is always such a difficult task to whittle all the wonderful stories down to just a few winners.  All entrants receive a certificate of participation, which can be collected in store until the end of October 2019.

This year’s winners and honourable mentions in each age category were as follows:
(click on the winning titles to read the story – use the tool bar at the bottom to scroll through pages)

Lower Primary School (Prep & Year 1)

WINNERS
Illustrations:  Super Cat: Race to the Crown by Hugo Wright
Picture story: The Chocolate Yaks of the Mornington Peninsula by Tyler McClusky
Short story: Sustainaville by Milly Davies

Middle Primary School (Years 2-4)

WINNERS
Poetry: The Magic Box by Luca Broadbent
Picture Story: The Day My Food Fought Back! by Perry McCluskey
Short Story:
1770 by Signe Hardt
Be Careful What You Wish For by Toby Adeney

HONOURABLE MENTIONS
Picture Story:
The Big Holiday by Gwendolin Mapp
Monster Catastrophe by Charlotte Calvert
Short Stories:
The Best Day by Olivia Natoli
The Medallion Thief by Amy Akers

Upper Primary School (Years 5 & 6)

WINNERS
Poetry: Different by Leah Reaper
Tormented Dreams by Faith Hatch
The White Horse by Viola Turchini

HONOURABLE MENTIONS
Trouble in Tango Bay by Sophie Doye
Water by Lilyana
The Odd Friendship by Ilyssa

Lower Secondary School (Years 7-9)

WINNERS
Freedom by Taylor Branford
Hide by Isobel Dymond

HONOURABLE MENTIONS
The Fire That Shook Me by Adam Houben
Welcome to Whiterock by Isabel York

Upper Secondary School (Years 10-12)

No One Knows Riva by Rebecca Shute

Congratulations to ALL ENTRANTS on your wonderful stories – we can’t wait to see what you have for us next year!!

If you’d like to check out the winners and honours list for this year’s Children’s Book Council of Australia Book Awards, you can see them here.  Note that there are usually supply delays for winners and notables following the announcement, but as always we are happy to place special orders if you would like a particular book.

We have limited signed copies of some of Jane Godwin‘s lovely books available in store now (while stocks last).  Her new books Tilly and One Blue Shoe, will be out in October.

LOVE YOUR BOOKSHOP DAY 2019!

Love Your Bookshop Day is about celebrating bookshops,
bookselling and the culture of books, reading and writing.

So whether you love us for our amazing staff and their awesome advice and friendly service,
our carefully curated range of gorgeous books,
our great events,
or just simply that wonderful sight and smell
when you step through the door,
we’d love to see you on
Saturday 10 August 

to help us celebrate!!


Here’s some of the great stuff we’ve got planned for the day:

  • We know so many of you love our wonderful front window displays, now here’s a chance to ‘win the window’! – thanks to the support of our wonderful publishers, we’ll have a window full of amazing books that you could win, simply by making a purchase of $50 or more in store on Saturday 10 August!  Ask staff for details on how to enter.

  • Children’s Illustrator Extraordinaire, James Hart, will be visiting between 11am and 1pm, drawing pictures on request!  Come on down for your very own personalised piece of art!!

  • We’ll be donating 10% of sales for the day to the Indigenous Literacy Foundation to support the fantastic work they do.  You can find out more about the ILF here.

  • Get creative and sign our graffiti wall – add in your favourite book titles, have a go at illustrating your favourite book character or just tell us what you love most about Farrells!

  • Sausage Sizzle from 11am-1pm, thanks to the Rotary Club of Mornington – proceeds also to the ILF.

  • Face Painting for the kids!  From 11am-1pm we’ll have free face painting for all our youngest bookshop lovers.

  • Colouring in Competition! For kids up to age 12, collect a copy of the picture in store or print a copy off here.  Entries should be returned by 5pm Wednesday 14 August, with the winners announced and prizes awarded at our Children’s Book Week celebration on Saturday 17 August at 3pm.

  • Micro-story Challenge – jump on our social media pages (Facebook and Instagram) to enter our micro-story competition – can you tell a story in only 10 words – no more, no less!?  Great prizes to be won.

  • Lucky book dip!  Make a purchase and then take your chances with our lucky dip – you could score an advanced reading copy of a forthcoming book or perhaps something that might have taken a knock or two but is still just as wonderful on the inside.

  • Double Loyalty Points! – for one day only, if you’re a member of our Friends of Farrells (FOF) Loyalty Program, you’ll earn double points for any eligible transaction (usual FOF rules apply).  Ask in store if you’d like to hear more about the Friends of Farrells Program – perhaps sign up on the day!