NOVEMBER NEW RELEASES

FICTION

End of the Ocean
Maja Lunde

In 2019, seventy-year-old Signe sets out on a hazardous voyage to cross an entire ocean in only a sailboat. She is haunted by the loss of the love of her life, and is driven by a singular and all-consuming mission to make it back to him.

In 2041, David flees with his young daughter, Lou, from a war-torn Southern Europe plagued by drought. They have been separated from their rest of their family and are on a desperate search to reunite with them once again, when they find Signe’s abandoned sailboat in a parched French garden, miles away from the nearest shore.

As David and Lou discover personal effects from Signe’s travels, their journey of survival and hope weaves together with Signe’s, forming a heartbreaking, inspiring story about the power of nature and the human spirit in this second novel from the author of the “spectacular and deeply moving” (New York Times bestselling author Lisa See) The History of Bees.


The Sun Sister (Seven Sisters #7)
Lucinda Riley

To the outside world, Electra D’Aplièse seems to be the woman with everything: as one of the world’s top models, she is beautiful, rich and famous. Yet beneath the veneer, and fuelled by the pressure of the life she leads, Electra’s already tenuous control over her state of mind has been rocked by the death of her father, Pa Salt, the elusive billionaire who adopted his six daughters from across the globe. Struggling to cope, she turns to alcohol and drugs to ease the pain, and as those around her fear for her health, Electra receives a letter from a complete stranger who claims to be her grandmother…

In 1939, Cecily Huntley-Morgan arrives in Kenya from New York to nurse a broken heart. Staying with her godmother, a member of the infamous Happy Valley set, on the shores of beautiful Lake Naivasha, she meets Bill Forsythe, a notorious bachelor and cattle farmer with close connections to the proud Maasai tribe. When disaster strikes and war is imminent, Cecily decides she has no choice but to accept Bill’s proposal. Moving up into the Wanjohi Valley, and with Bill away, Cecily finds herself isolated and alone. Until she discovers a new-born baby abandoned in the woods next to her farmhouse…

Sweeping from the frenetic atmosphere of Manhattan to the magnificent wide-open plains of Africa, The Sun Sister is the sixth installment in Lucinda Riley’s multi-million selling epic series, The Seven Sisters.


Damascus
Christos Tsiolkas

‘They kill us, they crucify us, they throw us to beasts in the arena, they sew our lips together and watch us starve. They bugger children in front of their mothers and violate men in front of their wives. The temple priests flay us openly in the streets. We are hunted everywhere and we are hunted by everyone …

We are despised, yet we grow. We are tortured and crucified and yet we flourish. We are hated and still we multiply. Why is that? You have to wonder, how is it that we not only survive but we grow stronger?’

Christos Tsiolkas’ stunning new novel Damascus is a work of soaring ambition and achievement, of immense power and epic scope, taking as its subject nothing less than events surrounding the birth and establishment of the Christian church. Based around the gospels and letters of St Paul, and focusing on characters one and two generations on from the death of Christ, as well as Paul (Saul) himself, Damascus nevertheless explores the themes that have always obsessed Tsiolkas as a writer: class, religion, masculinity, patriarchy, colonisation, exile; the ways in which nations, societies, communities, families and individuals are united and divided – it’s all here, the contemporary and urgent questions, perennial concerns made vivid and visceral.

In Damascus, Tsiolkas has written a masterpiece of imagination and transformation: an historical novel of immense power and an unflinching dissection of doubt and faith, tyranny and revolution, and cruelty and sacrifice.


The Topeka School
Ben Lerner

Adam Gordon is a senior at Topeka High School, class of ’97. His parents are psychologists, his mom a famous author in the field. A renowned debater and orator, an aspiring poet, and – although it requires a lot of posturing and weight lifting – one of the cool kids, he’s also one of the seniors who brings the loner Darren Eberheart into the social scene, with disastrous effects.

Deftly shifting perspectives and time periods, The Topeka School is a riveting story about the challenges of raising a good son in a culture of toxic masculinity. It is also a startling prehistory of the present: the collapse of public speech, the tyranny of trolls and the new right, and the ongoing crisis of identity among white men.


The Bee and the Orange Tree
Melissa Ashley

It’s 1699, and the salons of Paris are bursting with the creative energy of fierce, independent-minded women. But outside those doors, the patriarchal forces of Louis XIV and the Catholic Church are moving to curb their freedoms. In this battle for equality, Baroness Marie Catherine D’Aulnoy invents a powerful weapon: ‘fairy tales’.

When Marie Catherine’s daughter, Angelina, arrives in Paris for the first time, she is swept up in the glamour and sensuality of the city, where a woman may live outside the confines of the church or marriage. But this is a fragile freedom, as she discovers when Marie Catherine’s close friend Nicola Tiquet is arrested, accused of conspiring to murder her abusive husband. In the race to rescue Nicola, illusions will be shattered and dark secrets revealed as all three women learn how far they will go to preserve their liberty in a society determined to control them.

This keenly-awaited second book from Melissa Ashley, author of The Birdman’s Wife, restores another remarkable, little-known woman to her rightful place in history, revealing the dissent hidden beneath the whimsical surfaces of Marie Catherine’s fairy tales. The Bee and the Orange Tree is a beautifully lyrical and deeply absorbing portrait of a time, a place, and the subversive power of the imagination.


The Ocean at the End of the Lane (Illustrated edition)
Neil Gaiman
illustrated by Elise Hurst

“They say you cannot go home again, and that is as true as a knife . . .”

A man returns to the site of his childhood home where, years before, he knew a girl named Lettie Hempstock who showed him the most marvelous, dangerous, and outrageous things, but when he gets there he learns that nothing is as he remembered.

Wondrous, imaginative, impossible, and at times deeply scary, The Ocean at the End of the Lane is classic Neil Gaiman and has captured the hearts of readers everywhere. This beautiful illustrated edition features haunting, emotive artwork by renowned fine artist Elise Hurst, whose illustrations seamlessly interweave the childhood wonder and harrowing danger that infuse Gaiman’s beloved tale.


The Starless Sea
Erin Morgenstern

Zachary Ezra Rawlins is a graduate student in Vermont when he discovers a strange book hidden in the library stacks. As he turns the pages, entranced by tales of lovelorn prisoners, key collectors, and nameless acolytes, he reads something strange: a story from his own childhood. Bewildered by this inexplicable book and desperate to make sense of how his own life came to be recorded, Zachary uncovers a series of clues – a bee, a key, and a sword – that lead him to a masquerade party in New York, to a secret club, and through a doorway to a subterranean library, hidden far below the surface of the earth.

What Zachary finds in this curious place is more than just a buried home for books and their guardians – it is a place of lost cities and seas, lovers who pass notes under doors and across time, and of stories whispered by the dead. Zachary learns of those who have sacrificed much to protect this realm, relinquishing their sight and their tongues to preserve this archive, and also those who are intent on its destruction.

The author of international bestseller The Night Circus returns with a magical, timeless and wholly original love story set in a secret underground world.


Olive, Again
Elizabeth Strout

Olive, Again follows the blunt, contradictory yet deeply loveable Olive Kitteridge as she grows older, navigating the second half of her life as she comes to terms with the changes – sometimes welcome, sometimes not – in her own existence and in those around her.

Olive adjusts to her new life with her second husband, challenges her estranged son and his family to accept him, experiences loss and loneliness, witnesses the triumphs and heartbreaks of her friends and neighbours in the small coastal town of Crosby, Maine – and, finally, opens herself to new lessons about life.


CRIME / THRILLERS

You Don’t Know Me
Sara Foster

Lizzie Burdett was eighteen when she vanished, and Noah Carruso has never forgotten her. She was his first crush, his unrequited love. She was also his brother’s girlfriend.

Tom Carruso hasn’t been home in over a decade. He left soon after Lizzie disappeared under a darkening cloud of suspicion, and now he’s back for the inquest into Lizzie’s death – intent on telling his side of the story. As the inquest looms, Noah meets Alice Pryce on holiday. They fall for each other fast and hard, but Noah can’t bear to tell Alice his deepest fears. And Alice is equally stricken – she carries a terrible secret of her own. Is the truth worth telling if it will destroy everything?


Dead Man Switch
Tara Moss

She’s a woman in a man’s world …

Sydney, 1946. Billie Walker is living life on her own terms. World War II has left her bereaved, her photojournalist husband missing and presumed dead. Determined not to rely on any man for her future, she re-opens her late father’s detective agency.

Billie’s bread and butter is tailing cheating spouses – it’s easy, pays the bills and she has a knack for it. But her latest case, the disappearance of a young man, is not proving straightforward …

Soon Billie is up to her stylish collar in bad men, and not just the unfaithful kind – these are the murdering kind. Smugglers. Players. Gangsters. Billie and her loyal assistant must pit their wits against Sydney’s ruthless underworld and find the young man before it’s too late.


The Siberian Dilemma
Martin Cruz Smith

Journalist Tatiana Petrovna is on the move. Arkady Renko, iconic Moscow investigator and Tatiana’s part-time lover, hasn’t seen her since she left on assignment over a month ago. When she doesn’t arrive on her scheduled train, he’s positive something is wrong. No one else thinks Renko should be worried—Tatiana is known to disappear during deep assignments—but he knows her enemies all too well and the criminal lengths they’ll go to keep her quiet.

Renko embarks on a dangerous journey to find Tatiana and bring her back. From the banks of Lake Baikal to rundown Chita, Renko slowly learns that Tatiana has been profiling the rise of political dissident Mikhail Kuznetsov, a golden boy of modern oil wealth and the first to pose a true threat to Putin’s rule in over a decade. Though Kuznetsov seems like the perfect candidate to take on the corruption in Russian politics, his reputation becomes clouded when Boris Benz, his business partner and best friend, turns up dead. In a land of shamans and brutally cold nights, oligarchs wealthy on northern oil, and sea monsters that are said to prowl the deepest lake in the world, Renko needs all his wits about him to get Tatiana out alive.


A Minute to Midnight (Atlee Pine#2)
D
avid Baldacci

‘My sister was abducted from here nearly thirty years ago. The person who took her was never found. And neither was she. Her abductor nearly killed me. So I’m back here now trying to find the truth.’

Atlee Pine has spent most of her life trying to find out what happened that fateful night in Andersonville, Georgia. Her six-year-old twin sister, Mercy, was taken and Atlee was left for dead while their parents were apparently partying downstairs. One person who continues to haunt her is notorious serial killer, Daniel James Tor, confined to a Colorado maximum security prison. Does he really know what happened to Mercy?

The family moved away. The parents divorced. And Atlee chose a career with the FBI dedicating her life to catching those who hurt others. When she oversteps the mark on the arrest of a dangerous criminal, she’s given a leave of absence offering the perfect opportunity to return to where it all began, and find some answers. But the trip to Andersonville turns into a roller-coaster ride of murder, long-buried secrets and lies.

And a revelation so personal that everything she once believed to be true is fast turning to dust.


Blue Moon (Jack Reacher #24)
Lee
Child

Jack Reacher is back in a brand new white-knuckle read from Lee Child, creator of ‘today’s James Bond, a thriller hero we can’t get enough of’ (Ken Follett).

In a nameless city, two ruthless rival criminal gangs, one Albanian, the other Ukrainian, are competing for control. But they hadn’t counted on Jack Reacher arriving on their patch.

Reacher is trained to notice things. He’s on a Greyhound bus, watching an elderly man sleeping in his seat, with a fat envelope of cash hanging out of his pocket. Another passenger is watching too … obviously hoping to get rich quick.

As the mugger makes his move, Reacher steps in. The old man is grateful, yet he turns down Reacher’s offer to help him home. He’s vulnerable, scared, and clearly in big, big trouble.

What hold could the gangs possibly have on the old guy? Will Reacher sit back and let bad things happen? Or can he twist the situation to everyone’s benefit?

‘This is a random universe,’ he says. ‘Once in a blue moon things turn out just right.’

The odds are better with Reacher involved. That’s for damn sure.


In Darkness Visible
Tony Jones

In 2005, Marin Katich, living in Croatia under an alias, is being watched. Before the year is out, he has been assaulted, arrested, charged with serious war crimes and locked up in Scheveningen Prison in The Hague, waiting for his case to come before the International War Crimes Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia.

In Sydney, Anna Rosen, a freelance journalist, is sent photos on her computer of a man she knows to be dead-gunned down in a brutal ambush in Bosnia over a decade ago. A man she’d once loved but who had betrayed her. Is it possible that the photos really are of Marin Katich? And if so, what the hell had happened in 1992?

From Croatia to The Hague to Bosnia and Herzegovina to Sydney, Anna and Marin’s intertwined history fuels her determination to tear apart, piece-by-piece, his secrets, while continuing to keep her own.

In a dangerous pursuit of justice and revenge, navigating the murky world of national and international secret agencies and those who would still be warlords, Anna fights for what she believes in and for those she loves.

Tony Jones, one of Australia’s most admired journalists, blurs the lines between fiction and political reality, creating a page-turning, intriguing and gripping thriller.


NON-FICTION

Tell Me Why
Archie Roach

No one has lived as many lives as Archie Roach – stolen child, seeker, teenage alcoholic, lover, father, musical and lyrical genius, and leader – but it took him almost a lifetime to find out who he really was.

Roach was only two years old when he was forcibly removed from his family. Brought up by a series of foster parents until his early teens, his world imploded when he received a letter that spoke of a life he had no memory of.

In this intimate, moving and often shocking memoir, Archie’s story is an extraordinary odyssey through love and heartbreak, family and community, survival and renewal – and the healing power of music. Overcoming enormous odds to find his story and his people, Archie voices the joy, pain and hope he found on his path through song to become the legendary singer-songwriter and storyteller that he is today – beloved by fans worldwide.

Tell Me Why is a stunning account of resilience and the strength of spirit – and of a great love story.


Eat More Vegan
Luke Hines

Luke Hines is well known for his creative and healthy paleo takes on everyday favourites. This new book is filled with delicious recipes – all completely plant-based and gluten and grain free. Regardless of your food philosophy, we can all agree that we need to eat more plants and in Eat More Vegan Luke shares nutritious recipes that are packed with flavour and full of vibrant colour. This book is a celebration of amazing, generous and abundant vegan food – real food, there’s not a packet ingredient in sight!

There are flavourful and hearty breakfasts, such as herby carrot fritters with dream cheese, whole roasted hemp-crusted mushrooms and zucchini carpaccio with fresh lemon and olives. Salads, soups and sautés for any time of the day, such as amazing avocado salad with macadamia pesto, pumpkin soup with macadamia cream & crispy pumpkin skin shards, and spicy peanut stew.

More substantial roasts, bakes and barbecues, such as loaded hasselback sweet potatoes, sticky eggplant, spaghetti with sunflower bolognese and a hemp burger with the lot. And sweets to finish off, such as the ultimate chocolate mousse with roasted hazelnut crumb, blueberry bounty bars, and crunchy hazelnut butter bites.


Please, Gamble Irresponsibly
Titus O’Reily

Australians lose more money gambling than any other country. But how did we get here? In his inimitable, hilarious style, sports historian Titus O’Reily charts the rise, fall and rise of sport gambling in Australia.

We’ll gamble on anything, from two flies crawling up a wall to less important things like federal elections. And thanks to the internet, phones and gambling-tax loving governments, these days Australians can indulge their love of a punt no matter what they’re doing. Aussies could be at the birth of a child or performing open-heart surgery and still put a bet on.

It wasn’t always this easy. Once, you could only gamble on sport illegally. Which, it turns out, was actually also pretty easy. But over the last thirty years gambling on sport has been legalised, first slowly and then very quickly. Now almost every ad on TV is about sport betting, and even some of the players are getting in on the wagering.

Please, Gamble Irresponsibly traces the history of gambling in Australia from horseracing in the colonial era, through the rise of SP bookies and organised crime, to the commercialisation of the industry and its impact on communities and the integrity of sport. With billions of dollars involved, what are the odds of putting the genie back in the bottle?


Against All Odds
Craig Challen & Richard Harris

‘I just want to warn you. You’re going to dive to the end of the cave. You’re going to see these kids. They’re all looking healthy and happy and smiley. Then, you’re going to swim away, and they’re probably all going to die.’

In June 2018, for seventeen days, the world watched and held its breath as the Wild Boar soccer team were trapped deep in a cave in Thailand. Marooned beyond flooded cave passages after unexpected rains, they were finally rescued, one-by-one, against almost impossible odds, by an international cave-diving team which included Australians Dr Richard Harris and Dr Craig Challen.

These two men were chosen for their medical expertise and cave diving knowledge, but this dangerous rescue asked so much more of them. They had to remain calm under extreme pressure and intense scrutiny, adapt to constantly changing circumstances and importantly, build trust among the rescue team and with the young boys and their coach, whose lives were in their hands. Here is the story of these two Australian men who became international heroes – it is a story of determination, cunning and triumph that will long be remembered.


Dr Karl’s Random Road Trip Through Science
Karl Kruszelnicki

In this, his 45th book, Dr Karl goes full kolour, with brilliant and funny illustrations to match his dress sense. So take a technikolour trip through science with the intrepid Dr Karl, Australia’s favourite science guru.

Q: HOW MANY DR KARL BOOKS ARE THERE IN THE UNIVERSE?

A: MORE THAN A MILLION!

Dr Karl is on a mission to track down Awe and Wonder in the Universe.

Why do wombats poo cubes?

What nearly destroyed humanity on Halloween 2015?

How do you use an incinerating toilet?

Find out why we’ve sent a spacecraft with Dr Karl’s name on it to kiss the Sun, whether cannibalism is nutritious, and the answer to the Biggeset Question of All – why does spaghetti always break into three pieces? Plus a whole lot more.

So strap in and get ready for a random ride through the Universe. Who knows where you’ll end up!


The Golden Era
Rod Laver

From the 1950s to the 1970s, Australia was the world’s tennis superpower, producing players who dominated amateur grand slam tournaments, the Davis Cup and the professional circuit,and none was more successful, famous or influential than Rod Laver, whose two singles Grand Slams – winning the Australian, French, Wimbledon and United States championships in a calendar year – have never been equalled.

The Golden Era is Rod’s deeply personal account of those great years. As a participant and eye-witness, he captures the excitement and drama of the great wins, and gives us genuine insight into the band of supremely talented Australian champions who balanced playing hard with a legendary sportsmanship.Written with all of Rod’s peerless tennis knowledge, and including key interviews with Frank Sedgman, Ken Rosewall, the late Lew Hoad, Neale Fraser, Mal Anderson, Ashley Cooper, Roy Emerson, Fred Stolle, John Newcombe and Margaret Court, The Golden Era is the definitive story of the two decades of Australian tennis domination that will almost certainly never be repeated.


The Two Good Cook Book: Recipes. Stories. Community
Two Good Co.

It includes essays on food memories and the power of food from four of Australia’s finest contemporary authors – Charlotte Wood, Markus Zusak, Liane Moriarty and Thomas Keneally – paintings by artist Zoe Young, and more than 60 recipes by leading Australian and international chefs for simple nutritious family meals and celebratory feasts.

From an organic soup kitchen in Kings Cross, social enterprise Two Good has expanded to sell restaurant quality salads and soups designed by some of Australia’s leading chefs, delivered in distinctive glass jars. With every meal sold another is donated to a woman in a safe house. Two Good also provides training and employment pathways for domestic violence survivors.

Words by Liane Moriarty, Thomas Keneally, Charlotte Wood, Markus Zusak.

Recipes by Neil Perry, Maggie Beer, Ben Shewry, Nigella Lawson, Peter Gilmore, Yotam Ottolenghi, Skye Gyngell, Greg Doyle, Colin Fassnidge, Kylie Kwong, Pasi Petanen, Jackie Middleton, Danielle Alvarez, Chris Manfield, Analiese Gregory, Sarah Wilson, George Calombaris, Mitch Orr, Mat Lindsay, Hetty McKinnon, Matt Wilkinson, Jacqui Challinor, Mike McEnearney, Hamish Ingham, O’Tama Carey, Jonathan Barthelmess, Matt Moran.


Chika
Mitch Albom

Chika Jeune was born three days before the devastating earthquake that decimated Haiti in 2010. She spent her infancy in a landscape of extreme poverty, and when her mother died giving birth to a baby brother, Chika was brought to The Have Faith Haiti Orphanage that Albom operates in Port Au Prince.

With no children of their own, the forty-plus children who live, play, and go to school at the orphanage have become family to Mitch and his wife, Janine. Chika’s arrival makes a quick impression. Brave and self-assured, even as a three-year-old, she delights the other kids and teachers. But at age five, Chika is suddenly diagnosed with something a doctor there says, “No one in Haiti can help you with.”

Mitch and Janine bring Chika to Detroit, hopeful that American medical care can soon return her to her homeland. Instead, Chika becomes a permanent part of their household, and their lives, as they embark on a two-year, around-the-world journey to find a cure. As Chika’s boundless optimism and humor teach Mitch the joys of caring for a child, he learns that a relationship built on love, no matter what blows it takes, can never be lost.

Told in hindsight, and through illuminating conversations with Chika herself, this is Albom at his most poignant and vulnerable. Finding Chika is a celebration of a girl, her adoptive guardians, and the incredible bond they formed—a devastatingly beautiful portrait of what it means to be a family, regardless of how it is made.


We Are Here
Meg Mundell

How can you feel anchored when you have no place to call your own?

Australia has a large shadow population of people who experience homelessness – whether couch-surfing, staying in a refuge, boarding house or caravan park, or sleeping rough. Too often they are dismissed or blamed. They are spoken for, and about, but rarely get to speak for themselves.

Edited by former BIG ISSUE deputy editor Meg Mundell, We Are Here is a vibrant and moving collection of true stories showcasing the creative talents of people who have known homelessness. From cold city doorways to lonely bush camps, from a borrowed couch to a discreetly parked car, from dodgy boarding houses to the humid hell of Manus Island, these powerful, defiant and illuminating stories will make every reader question their place in the world. And the kind of place they want the world to be.

All profits from the sale of this book will be donated to charities that work with people experiencing homelessness. The writers and visual artists featured in We Are Here have been paid for their contributions.


Who Owns History?
Geoffrey Roberston

Hard on the heels of his best-selling autobiography Rather His Own Man, one of Australia’s foremost public intellectuals turns his mind to one of the most important contemporary questions that divides the world of art and culture: the restitution of heritage treasures removed in earlier times from subjugated peoples who now want them back.

Taking his cue from Cicero, the great Roman barrister, Geoffrey Robertson argues that justice requires the return not only of the ‘Elgin’ Marbles to Greece, but of many looted antiquities on display in the museums of Britain, Europe and America. He argues that the Gweagal Shield – dropped when Cook shot at Aboriginals in Botany Bay in 1770 – should be returned to Australia from the British Museum. He wants the government to acquire the hull of HMS Endeavour recently located off Rhode Island. He has located Arthur Phillip’s tombstone for Yemmerrawanne, the first Australian expatriate, in a South London churchyard, and he wants to bring it back.

Robertson’s judgement is uncompromising: cultural heritage belongs to the people of whose history it is a part, unless its return would be attended by danger to the artwork itself. And since the movement for the restitution of cultural property is based on human rights, governments that want it back must show respect for the rights of the peoples on whose behalf they make the claim.

Who Owns History? not only delves into the crucial debate over the Marbles, but examines how the past can be experienced by everyone, as well as by the people of the country of origin.


Rick Stein’s Secret France
Rick Stein

Over fifty years ago Rick Stein first set foot in France. Now, he returns to the food and cooking he loves the most … and makes us fall in love with French food all over again.

Rick’s meandering quest through the byways and back roads of rural France sees him pick up inspiration from Normandy to Provence. With characteristic passion and joie de vivre, Rick serves up incredible recipes: chicken stuffed with mushrooms and Comté, grilled bream with aioli from the Languedoc coast, a duck liver parfait bursting with flavour, and a recipe for the most perfect raspberry tart plus much, much more.

Simple fare, wonderful ingredients, all perfectly assembled; Rick finds the true essence of a food so universally loved, and far easier to recreate than you think.


Big Sister, Little Sister, Red Sister
Jung Chang

The best-known modern Chinese fairy tale is the story of three sisters from Shanghai, who for most of the twentieth century were at the centre of power in China. It was sometimes said that ‘One loved money, one loved power and one loved her country’, but there was far more to the Soong sisters than these caricatures. As China battled through a hundred years of wars, revolutions and seismic transformations, each sister played an important, sometimes critical role, and left an indelible mark on history.

Red Sister, Ching-ling, married Sun Yat-sen, founding father of the Chinese republic, and later became Mao’s vice-chair. Little Sister, May-ling, was Madame Chiang Kai-shek, first lady of the pre-Communist Nationalist China and a major political figure in her own right. Big Sister, Ei-ling, was Chiang’s unofficial main adviser. She made herself one of China’s richest women – and her husband Chiang’s prime minister. All three sisters enjoyed tremendous privilege and glory, but also endured constant attacks and mortal danger. They showed great courage and experienced passionate love, as well as despair and heartbreak. The relationship between them was highly charged emotionally, especially once they had embraced opposing political camps and Ching-ling dedicated herself to destroying her two sisters’ world.

Big Sister, Little Sister, Red Sister is a gripping story of love, war, exile, intrigue, glamour and betrayal, which takes us on a monumental journey, from Canton to Hawaii and New York, from exiles’ quarters in Japan and Berlin to secret meeting rooms in Moscow, and from the compounds of the Communist elite in Beijing to the corridors of power in democratic Taiwan. In a group biography that is by turns intimate and epic, Jung Chang reveals the lives of three extraordinary women who helped shape the history of twentieth-century China.


James Cook
Peter FitzSimons

The name Captain James Cook is one of the most recognisable in Australian history – an almost mythic figure who is often discussed, celebrated, reviled and debated. But who was the real James Cook?

This Yorkshire farm boy would go on to become the foremost mariner, navigator and cartographer of his era, and to personally map a third of the globe. His great voyages of discovery were incredible feats of seamanship and navigation. Leading a crew of men into uncharted territories, Cook would face the best and worst of humanity as he took himself and his crew to the edge of the known world – and beyond.

With his masterful storytelling talent, Peter FitzSimons brings James Cook to life. Focusing on his most iconic expedition, the voyage of the Endeavour, where Cook first set foot on Australian and New Zealand soil, FitzSimons contrasts Cook against another figure who looms large in Australasian history: Joseph Banks, the aristocratic botanist. As they left England, Banks, a rich, famous playboy, was everything that Cook was not. The voyage tested Cook’s character and would help define his legacy.

Now, 240 years after James Cook’s death, FitzSimons reveals what kind of man James was at heart. His strengths, his weaknesses, his passions and pursuits, failures and successes.

James Cook reveals the man behind the myth.


Surf Like a Girl
Carolina Amell

Whether they’re threading a barrel or shredding a swell, these amazing women are making enormous waves in the world of surfing.

If you thought surfing was a male-dominated sport, think again. The thirty women surfers profiled in this thrilling collection can rip a wave with the best of them. Hailing from all over the world, each surfer is featured in spectacular photography and with their own inspirational words. There’s American professional surfer Lindsay Steinriede on how her father’s death has inspired her career; French board shaper Valerie Duprat on how she got her start “sculpting foam”; Conchita Rossler, founder of Mooana Retreat in Portugal, on connecting mind, body, and spirit; and Australian photographer Cait Miers on empowering women.

You’ll also meet surfers who are over sixty, who surf while pregnant, who captain boats, teach yoga, and make movies. Breathtaking photography captures these women from every angle, on and off the waves, in some of the world’s most visually stunning locations. The perfect gift for surfing enthusiasts, this unique compilation of stunning pictures and hard-won wisdom proves that the thrill of catching a wave, riding it, and kicking out belongs to everyone.


The Commons
Matthew Evans

We all want more air in our lives. Brighter skies, slower days, more time for growing, for cooking, for family. In The Commons, a book inspired by the hit SBS television show Gourmet Farmer, Matthew Evans captures Fat Pig Farm’s year of growing, cooking and feasting. It’s part how-to, part evocative diary, part cookbook (with more than 100 recipes).

It’s the perfect inspiration for those about to embark on a simpler life, a handy reference for those who already have done just that, and a vicarious solution for those who just want to dream the dream without leaving home.


The History of the World in Fifty Dogs
Mackenzi Lee

Most dog lovers know Fidoand Laika, but how about Martha, Paul McCartney’s Old English Sheepdog? Or Peritas, Alexander the Great’s trusted canine companion?

As long as there have been humans, those humans have had beloved companions—their dogs. From the ancient Egyptians mummifying their pups, to the Indian legend of the king who refused to enter the afterlife unless his dog was allowed there too, to the modern meme and popularity of terms like the corgi sploot, humans are undeniably obsessed with their dogs.

Told in short, illustrated essays that are interspersed with both historical and canine factoids, The History of the World in Fifty Dogs brings to life some of history’s most memorable moments through the stories of the dogs that saw them happen.


More
Matt Preston

Maybe you want to eat more vegetables, or less meat, or try cooking some tasty vegan meals to broaden your repertoire and still put a broad smile on the faces of those you are feeding?

Maybe you want save money or the environment by eating more plant-based meals, or maybe you just want to keep the vegan or vego in the family happy at dinnertime without having to cook two meals?

Maybe you just want to enjoy a meat-free Monday every so often and don’t want to feel like you’re missing out?

Here are over 100 recipes full of vibrant colours and flavours that celebrate the pure, unadulterated pleasure that food can give you. All the recipes are vegetarian or vegan – but if you decide you’d like to add a little bacon or a slab of fish, we’re not going to wag a finger. We’ve even included a separate cooking guide for your meaty add-ons.

Gone are the grey-meat-and-potatoes menus of the past. Each of these recipes capture the happiness that good food can bring. More combines Matt’s passion for simple, hearty recipes with his love of the humble veggie to bring the whole family to the table for a delicious meal.


Adam Spencer’s Numberland
Adam Spencer

Australia’s funniest mathematician returns in 2019 with more rollicking romps through the world of science, technology, numbers and all things nerdy.

This terrific new fully illustrated title follows on from Adam’s bestselling Big Book of Numbers (2014); World of Numbers (2015), Time Machine (2016), The Number Games (2017), and Top 100 (2018), and is packed full of fascinating facts, tantalising trivia, brainbusting number puzzles, and much much more.


Bowie’s Books
John O’Connell

Three years before he died, David Bowie made a list of the one hundred books that had transformed his life – a list that formed something akin to an autobiography. From Madame Bovary to A Clockwork Orange, the Iliad to the Beano, these were the publications that had fuelled his creativity and shaped who he was.

In Bowie’s Books, John O’Connell explores this list in the form of one hundred short essays, each offering a perspective on the man, performer and creator that is Bowie, his work as an artist and the era that he lived in.

Bowie’s Books is much more than a list of books you should read in your lifetime: it is a unique insight into one of the greatest minds of our times, and an indispensable part of the legacy that Bowie left behind.


Just Desserts
Charlotte Ree

You’d butter believe this is the only baking book you’ll need this Christmas!

Instagram sensation Charlotte Ree is famous for her simple and delicious sweets … and her love of puns. Her easy, user-friendly creations are designed to taste amazing, rather than just look pretty (though pretty they most certainly are!).

Just Desserts showcases 30 of Charlotte’s most popular and delicious cake, biscuit, slice and dessert recipes in one outrageously gorgeous little package. Featuring essentials, such as chocolate brownies, shortbread caramel slice and chocolate-chip cookies through to show stoppers, such as layered berry pavlova and chocolate ganache & blackberry bundt, Just Desserts is the ideal gift for the baker and sweet-lover in your life – even if that’s YOU!


Your Own Kind of Girl
Clare Bowditch

Clare Bowditch has always had a knack for telling stories. Through her music and performing, this beloved Australian artist has touched hundreds of thousands of lives. But what of the stories she used to tell herself? That ‘real life’ only begins once you’re thin or beautiful, that good things only happen to other people.

Your Own Kind of Girl reveals a childhood punctuated by grief, anxiety and compulsion, and tells how these forces shaped Clare’s life for better and for worse. This is a heartbreaking, wise and at times playful memoir. Clare’s own story told raw and as it happened. A reminder that even on the darkest of nights, victory is closer than it seems.

With startling candour, Clare lays bare her truth in the hope that doing so will inspire anyone who’s ever done battle with their inner critic. This is the work of a woman who has found her true power – and wants to pass it on. Happiness, we discover, is only possible when we take charge of the stories we tell ourselves.


Tea and Scotch with Bradman
Roland Perry

In 1995, journalist and author Roland Perry wrote to Sir Donald Bradman requesting an interview for a biography he was planning of the great cricketer. Surprisingly, the Don agreed. It was the start of a conversation that continued for years, during which the real Bradman shone, not only as a great sportsman but musician, brilliant thinker and humourist with a fondness for tea and a Scotch or two.

In Tea and Scotch with Bradman, Perry paints an intimate and revealing portrait of the man many regard as the greatest Australian cricketer of all time.


Acid for the Children
Flea

The strange tale of a boy named Flea starts in Rye, NY. It was all very normal. But soon his parents divorced and his mother Patricia remarried a jazz musician. Flea’s stepfather frequently invited musicians to his house for jam sessions which sparked Flea’s interest in music. The family moved to Los Angeles, where Flea became fascinated with the trumpet, idolizing musicians like Miles, Dizzy, and Louis.

But the family soon fell apart, “I was raised in a very violent, alcoholic household,” Flea later said. “I grew up being terrified of my parents, particularly my father figures. It caused [me] a lot of trouble later in life.” He began smoking weed at 13, and became a daily user of harder drugs. He was on the streets by 14 and soon after, met another social outcast and drug user named Anthony Kiedis. They form a band that would become the Red Hot Chili Peppers.

Acid For The Children is pure, uncut Flea, with nothing left unsaid.


Australian Designers at Home
Jenny Rose-Innes

Australian Designers at Home invites readers into the homes of 20 of the country’s leading names in interior design. With unfettered access to their most private retreats, we see where the best of the industry express their true, unfiltered selves. Jenny Rose-Innes celebrates the designers who have inspired her, sharing their histories and houses, as well as professional insights and practical tips on decorating. This book provides an invaluable resource for designers, decorators and interiors enthusiasts alike.

Richly illustrated throughout with stunning colour photography by Simon Griffiths, Australian Designers at Home takes readers on an intimate journey, revealing how the most influential designers decorate their own houses. Find out what home means from the people who create them for a living.


Between the Stops
Sandi Toksvig

Between the Stops is a sort of a memoir, my sort. It’s about a bus trip really, because it’s my view from the Number 12 bus (mostly top deck, the seat at the front on the right), a double-decker that plies its way from Dulwich, in South East London, where I was living, to where I sometimes work – at the BBC, in the heart of the capital. It’s not a sensible way to write a memoir at all, probably, but it’s the way things pop into your head as you travel, so it’s my way’.

From London facts including where to find the blue plaque for Una Marson, ‘The first black woman programme maker at the BBC’, to discovering the best Spanish coffee under Southwark’s railway arches; from a brief history of lady gangsters at Elephant and Castle to memories of climbing Mount Sinai and, at the request of a fellow traveller, reading aloud the Ten Commandments; from the story behind Pissarro’s painting of Dulwich Station to performing in Footlights with Emma Thompson; from painful memoires of being sent to Coventry while at a British boarding school to thinking about how Wombells Travelling Circus of 1864 haunts Peckham Rye;from anecdotes about meeting Prince Charles, Monica Lewinsky and Grayson Perry to Bake Off antics; from stories of a real and lasting friendship with John McCarthy to the importance of family and the daunting navigation of the Zambezi River in her father’s canoe, this Sandi Toksvig-style memoir is, as one would expect and hope, packed full of surprises.

A funny and moving trip through memories, musings and the many delights on the Number 12 route, Between the Stops is also an inspiration to us all to get off our phones, look up and to talk to each other because as Sandi says: ‘some of the greatest trips lie on our own doorstep’.


The Man in the Red Coat
Julian Barnes

In the summer of 1885, three Frenchmen arrived in London for a few days’ shopping. One was a Prince, one was a Count, and the third was a commoner with an Italian name, who four years earlier had been the subject of one of John Singer Sargent’s greatest portraits. The commoner was Samuel Pozzi, society doctor, pioneer gynaecologist and free-thinker – a rational and scientific man with a famously complicated private life.

Pozzi’s life played out against the backdrop of the Parisian Belle Epoque. The beautiful age of glamour and pleasure more often showed its ugly side: hysterical, narcissistic, decadent and violent, a time of rampant prejudice and blood-and-soil nativism, with more parallels to our own age than we might imagine.

The Man in the Red Coat is at once a fresh and original portrait of the Belle Epoque – its heroes and villains, its writers, artists and thinkers – and a life of a man ahead of his time. Witty, surprising and deeply researched, the new book from Julian Barnes illuminates the fruitful and longstanding exchange of ideas between Britain and France, and makes a compelling case for keeping that exchange alive.


Icons of Footy
Kevin Sheedy

Footy legend Kevin Sheedy crosses team alliances to profile the 21 most iconic Aussie Rules players and coaches of his lifetime. He also sits down for interviews with nine icons he has long admired and who don’t normally (for various reasons) have their stories told. Packed full of wisdom and wit, insight and memories, Icons of Footy is a treasure-trove for football fans of all tribes and ages, from one of the most unique and colourful characters in Australian sport.

This beautifully-packaged hardback includes: Gary Ablett Senior, Allen Aylett, Ron Barassi, Kevin Bartlett, Malcolm Blight, Barry Cable, Wayne Carey, Alastair Clarkson, Jason Dunstall, Graham Farmer, Lance Franklin, Adam Goodes, Royce Hart, Francis Hughes, James Hird, Alex Jesaulenko, Leigh Matthews, Kevin Murray, John Nicholls, Barrie Robran, Michael Tuck.


In An Australian Light
Thames & Hudson

Australia is drenched in a light that is different from anywhere else in the world. A light so distinctive, we know it can only be of one place.

Imagined as a celebration of the particular beauty of Australian light, this generous publication roams the country, from rugged coastline to arid outback, to reveal how light shapes our wide, brown land. Wind-etched rocks, patterns in sand. Teal oceans. Surfers, slick in their wetsuits against the morning sun. A beach filled with people. A beach with no people. Rockpools. High-rise buildings against sand and sea. Golden sunsets over city skylines. Rays reaching through forest branches to frosted ground. Paddocks muted by mist, trees laden with luminous snow. The variation in the fall of light on our landscape seems limitless.

With an introduction by a galactic astrophysicist, In an Australian Light reminds us of the myriad ways we experience light in this vast and diverse land.


The Lost Boys
Paul Byrnes

In the First World War of 1914–1918, thousands of boys across Australia and New Zealand lied about their age, forged a parent’s signature and left to fight on the other side of the world. Though some were as young as thirteen, they soon found they could die as well as any man. Like Peter Pan’s lost boys, they have remained forever young. These are their stories.

This extraordinary book captures the incredible and previously untold stories of forty Anzac boys who fought in the First World War, from Gallipoli to the Armistice. Featuring haunting images of the boys taken at training camps and behind the lines, these tales are both heartbreaking and rousing, full of daring, ingenuity, recklessness, random horror and capricious luck.

A unique perspective on the First World War, The Lost Boys is military history made deeply personal, a powerful homage to youthful bravery and a poignant reminder of the sacrifice of war.


Perspective
Ellyse Perry

Ellyse Perry is among the all-time cricket greats – she’s the only player, female or male, to represent Australia in both cricket and soccer World Cups, with her international debuts in both sports at age 16, and was the youngest ever Test debut at the age of 17 … and she is just getting started.

From the lessons of a high-performance athlete’s career to appreciating the small things in life – this inspiring illustrated book, for fans of Ellyse Perry, features stories and reflections from her childhood and career on the themes of dreaming, belief, work, resilience, acceptance, opportunity, balance and perseverance – and their importance in everything we do.

Perspective is an empowering book with a unique view of what it is to be an elite athlete from one of Australia’s most admired sports stars.


Iconic: Modern Australian Houses 1950-2000
McCartney

Iconic: Modern Australian Houses 1950–2000 showcases, in a fresh, new and collectible edition, the best residential projects from the previously published works 50/60/70 and 70/80/90 and which formed successful exhibitions shown at the Museum of Sydney. Completely redesigned in a new format, with revised introduction, this classic will find audiences both new to and familiar with the gems of Australian modernist architecture.

Featuring houses from: Harry Seidler, Peter Muller, Roy Grounds, Peter McIntyre, Russell Jack, Robin Boyd, McGlashan Everist, Enrico Taglietti, Neville Gruzman, Bruce Rickard, Hugh Buhrich, Ian McKay, Iwan Iwanoff, Ian Collins, Richard Leplastrier, Glenn Murcott, Barrie Marshall, Ken Woolley, Lovell Chen, Wood Marsh, Andresen O’Gorman, Durbach Block, Sean Godsell, Stutchbury and Harper, Donovan Hill, John Wardle.

OCTOBER NEW RELEASES

FICTION

The Weekend
Charlotte Wood

People went on about death bringing friends together, but it wasn’t true. The graveyard, the stony dirt – that’s what it was like now . . . Despite the three women knowing each other better than their own siblings, Sylvie’s death had opened up strange caverns of distance between them.

Four older women have a lifelong friendship of the best kind: loving, practical, frank and steadfast. But when Sylvie dies, the ground shifts dangerously for the remaining three. Can they survive together without her?

They are Jude, a once-famous restaurateur, Wendy, an acclaimed public intellectual, and Adele, a renowned actress now mostly out of work. Struggling to recall exactly why they’ve remained close all these years, the grieving women gather for Christmas at Sylvie’s old beach house – not for festivities, but to clean the place out before it is sold.

Without Sylvie to maintain the group’s delicate equilibrium, frustrations build and painful memories press in. Fraying tempers, an elderly dog, unwelcome guests and too much wine collide in a storm that brings long-buried hurts to the surface – and threatens to sweep away their friendship for good.

The Weekend explores growing old and growing up, and what happens when we’re forced to uncover the lies we tell ourselves. Sharply observed and excruciatingly funny, this is a jewel of a book: a celebration of tenderness and friendship that is nothing short of a masterpiece.


The Eighth Life
Nino Haratischvili
(Translated by Charlotte Collins & Ruth Martin)

At the start of the twentieth century, on the edge of the Russian Empire, a family prospers. It owes its success to a delicious chocolate recipe, passed down the generations with great solemnity and caution. A caution which is justified: this is a recipe for ecstasy that carries a very bitter aftertaste …

Stasia learns it from her Georgian father and takes it north, following her new husband, Simon, to his posting at the centre of the Russian Revolution in St Petersburg. Stasia’s is only the first in a symphony of grand but all too often doomed romances that swirl from sweet to sour in this epic tale of the red century.

Tumbling down the years, and across vast expanses of longing and loss, generation after generation of this compelling family hears echoes and sees reflections. Great characters and greater relationships come and go and come again; the world shakes, and shakes some more, and the reader rejoices to have found at last one of those glorious old books in which you can live and learn, be lost and found, and make indelible new friends.


Bruny
Heather Rose

How far would your government go?

A right-wing US president has withdrawn America from the Middle East and the UN. Daesh has a thoroughfare to the sea and China is Australia’s newest ally. When a bomb goes off in remote Tasmania, Astrid Coleman agrees to return home to help her brother before an upcoming election. But this is no simple task. Her brother and sister are on either side of politics, the community is full of conspiracy theories, and her father is quoting Shakespeare. Only on Bruny does the world seem sane.

Until Astrid discovers how far the government is willing to go.

Bruny is a searing, subversive, brilliant novel about family, love, loyalty and the new world order.


Grand Union: Stories
Zadie Smith

Zadie Smith has established herself as one of the most iconic, critically-respected, and popular writers of her generation. In her first short story collection, she combines her power of observation and inimitable voice to mine the fraught and complex experience of life in the modern world.

With ten extraordinary new stories complemented by a selection of her most lauded pieces for The New YorkerThe Paris Review, and Granta, Grand Union explores a wide range of subjects, from first loves to cultural despair, as well as the desire to be the subject of your own experience. In captivating prose, she contends with race, class, relationships, and gender roles in a world that feels increasingly divided.

Nothing is off limits, and everything–when captured by Smith’s brilliant gaze–feels fresh and relevant. Perfectly paced, and utterly original, Grand Union highlights the wonders Zadie Smith can do.


On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous
Ocean Vuong

On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous is a letter from a son to a mother who cannot read. Written when the speaker, Little Dog, is in his late twenties, the letter unearths a family’s history that began before he was born  a history whose epicentre is rooted in Vietnam  and serves as a doorway into parts of his life his mother has never known, all of it leading to an unforgettable revelation.

At once a witness to the fraught yet undeniable love between a single mother and her son, it is also a brutally honest exploration of race, class, and masculinity. Asking questions central to the American moment, immersed as it is in addiction, violence, and trauma, but undergirded by compassion and tenderness, On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous is as much about the power of telling one’s own story as it is about the obliterating silence of not being heard.

With stunning urgency and grace, Ocean Vuong writes of people caught between disparate worlds, and asks how we heal and rescue one another without forsaking who we are. The question of how to survive, and how to make of it a kind of joy, powers the most important debut novel of many years.


The Museum of Broken Promises
Elizabeth Buchan

Paris, today. The Museum of Broken Promises is a place of wonder and sadness, hope and loss. Every object in the museum has been donated – a cake tin, a wedding veil, a baby’s shoe. And each represent a moment of grief or terrible betrayal. The museum is a place where people come to speak to the ghosts of the past and, sometimes, to lay them to rest. Laure, the owner and curator, has also hidden artefacts from her own painful youth amongst the objects on display.

Prague, 1985. Recovering from the sudden death of her father, Laure flees to Prague. But life behind the Iron Curtain is a complex thing: drab and grey yet charged with danger. Laure cannot begin to comprehend the dark, political currents that run beneath the surface of this communist city. Until, that is, she meets a young dissident musician. Her love for him will have terrible and unforeseen consequences.

It is only years later, having created the museum, that Laure can finally face up to her past and celebrate the passionate love which has directed her life.


Paris Savages
Katherine Johnston

Fraser Island, 1882. The population of the Badtjala people is in sharp decline following a run of brutal massacres. When German scientist Louis Müller offers to sail three Badtjala people – Bonny, Jurano and Dorondera – to Europe to perform to huge crowds, the proud and headstrong Bonny agrees, hoping to bring his people’s plight to the Queen of England.

Accompanied by Müllers bright, grieving daughter, Hilda, the group begins their journey to belle-époque Europe to perform in Hamburg, Berlin, Paris and eventually London. While crowds in Europe are enthusiastic to see the unique dances, singing, fights and pole climbing from the oldest culture in the world, the attention is relentless, and the fascination of scientists intrusive. When disaster strikes, Bonny must find a way to return home.

A story of love, bravery, culture, and the fight against injustice, Paris Savages brings a little-known part of history to blazing life, from award-winning novelist Katherine Johnson.


Cilka’s Journey
Heather Morris

In 1942 Cilka is just sixteen years old when she is taken to Auschwitz-Birkenau Concentration Camp. The Commandant at Birkenau, Schwarzhuber, notices her long beautiful hair, and forces her separation from the other women prisoners. Cilka learns quickly that power, even unwillingly given, equals survival.  After liberation, Cilka is charged as a collaborator for sleeping with the enemy and sent to a desolate, brutal prison camp in Siberia known as Vorkuta, inside the Arctic Circle.

Innocent and imprisoned once again, Cilka faces challenges both new and horribly familiar. When she makes an impression on a female doctor, Cilka is taken under her wing and begins to tend to the ill in the camp, struggling to care for them under unimaginable conditions. Cilka finds endless resources within herself as she confronts death and faces terror, each day a battle for survival. And when she nurses a man called Aleksandr, Cilka finds that despite everything that has happened to her, there is room in her heart for love.

Based on what is known of Cilka’s time in Auschwitz, and on the experience of women in Siberian prison camps, Cilka’s Journey is the breathtaking sequel to The Tattooist of Auschwitz. A powerful testament to the triumph of the human will in adversity, Cilka’s Journey will make you weep, but it will also leave you with the remarkable story of one woman’s fierce determination to survive, against all odds.


Maybe The Horse Will Talk
Elliot Perlman

I am absolutely terrified of losing a job I absolutely hate.

Stephen Maserov has problems. A onetime teacher, married to fellow teacher Eleanor, he has retrained and is now a second-year lawyer working at mega-firm Freely Savage Carter Blanche. Despite toiling around the clock to make budget, he’s in imminent danger of being downsized. And to make things worse, Eleanor, sick of single-parenting their two young children thanks to Stephen’s relentless work schedule, has asked him to move out.

To keep the job he hates, pay the mortgage and salvage his marriage, he will have to do something strikingly daring, something he never thought himself capable of. But if he’s not careful, it might be the last job he ever has…

Warm, dramatic, and at times laugh-out-loud funny, with the narrative pull of a thriller, Maybe the Horse Will Talk is a love story, a reflection on contemporary marriage, and on friendship. It is also an unflinching examination of sexual harassment in the workplace and an exposé of corporate corruption that taps directly into the pulse of our times.


Girl
Edna O’Brien

Captured, abducted and married into Boko Haram, the narrator of this story witnesses and suffers the horrors of a community of men governed by a brutal code of violence. Barely more than a girl herself, she must soon learn how to survive as a woman with a child of her own. Just as the world around her seems entirely consumed by madness, bound for hell, she is offered an escape of sorts – but only into another landscape of trials and terrors amidst the unforgiving wilds of northeastern Nigeria, through the forest and beyond; a place where her traumas are met with the blinkered judgement of a society in denial.

How do we love in a world that has lost its moorings? How can we comprehend the barbarism of our enemies, and learn forgiveness for atrocities committed in the name of ideology?


Before the Coffee Gets Cold
Toshikazu Kawaguchi

In a small back alley in Tokyo, there is a café which has been serving carefully brewed coffee for more than one hundred years. But this coffee shop offers its customers a unique experience: the chance to travel back in time.

In Before the Coffee Gets Cold, we meet four visitors, each of whom is hoping to make use of the café’s time-travelling offer, in order to: confront the man who left them, receive a letter from their husband whose memory has been taken by early onset Alzheimer’s, to see their sister one last time, and to meet the daughter they never got the chance to know.

But the journey into the past does not come without risks: customers must sit in a particular seat, they cannot leave the café, and finally, they must return to the present before the coffee gets cold …

Toshikazu Kawaguchi’s beautiful, moving story explores the age-old question: what would you change if you could travel back in time? More importantly, who would you want to meet, maybe for one last time?


The Death of Jesus
J.M. Coetzee

David has grown to be a tall ten-year-old. He is a natural at soccer, and loves kicking a ball around with his friends. His father Simón and Bolívar the dog usually watch. His mother Inés works in a fashion boutique.

David still asks lots of questions. In dancing class at the Academy of Music he dances as he chooses. He refuses to do sums and will not read any books except Don Quixote.

One day Julio Fabricante, the director of a nearby orphanage, invites David and his friends to form a proper soccer team. David decides he will leave Simón and Inés to live with Julio. Before long he succumbs to a mysterious illness.

In The Death of Jesus, J. M. Coetzee continues to explore the meaning of a world empty of memory but brimming with questions.


Act of Grace
Anna Krien

Australian soldier Toohey returns from Baghdad in 2003 with shrapnel in his neck, crippled by PTSD and white-knuckling life. In the Iraq of a decade earlier, aspiring pianist Nasim falls from favour with Saddam Hussein and his psychopathic son Uday, triggering a perilous search for safety. In Melbourne as the millennium turns, Robbie, faced with her father’s dementia and the family silences that may never find voice, tests boundaries. And in the present day, Gerry seeks to escape his father Toohey’s tyranny and heal its wounds.

These characters’ worlds intertwine across time and place, in a brilliant story of fear and sacrifice, trauma and survival, and what people will do to outrun the shadows. Crossing the frontiers of war, protest and cultural reconciliation, Act of Grace is a meditation on inheritance: the damage that one generation bestows upon the next, and the potential for transformation.

This is a searing, powerful and utterly original work by an exceptional Australian writer. It will leave you changed.


The Giver of Stars
Jojo Moyes

Alice Wright has travelled halfway across the world to escape her stifling life in England. Handsome American businessman Bennett Van Cleve represents a fresh start. But she soon realises that swapping the twitching curtains of suburbia for newlywed life in the wild mountains of Kentucky isn’t the answer to her prayers. But maybe meeting Margery O’Hara is. The heart and backbone of the small community of Salt Lick, a woman who isn’t afraid of anything or anyone, Margery is on a mission.

Enlisting Alice, along with three other women, all from very different backgrounds, to join her, the band of unlikely sisters battle the elements and unforgiving terrain – as well as brave all manner of dangers and social disapproval – to ride hundreds of miles a week to deliver books to isolated families. Transforming the lives of so many is all the impetus they need to take such risks.

And for Alice, her new job and blossoming friendships become an unexpected lifeline, providing her with the courage she needs to make some tough decisions about her marriage. Then a body is found in the mountains, rocking the close-knit community and tearing the women apart as one of them becomes the prime suspect. Can they pull together to overcome their greatest challenge yet?

Inspired by a remarkable true story, the unforgettable journey of five extraordinary women living in extraordinary and perilous times. A love letter to the power of books and literature and their ability to bring us together and deliver the truth, as well as a tribute to female friendship.


Being Black ‘n Chicken, & Chips
Matt Okine

Mike Amon is a regular teenager. All he wants is to fit in. He wants to sit at the cool bench. He wants to be a star athlete. He wants his first kiss.

He also wants his mum to survive.

When his mum is suddenly diagnosed with advanced breast and brain cancer, Mike knows it’s a long shot, but if he manages to achieve his dreams, maybe it’ll give his mum enough strength to beat an incurable disease.

In the meantime, he has to live with his African dad whom he doesn’t really know, a man who has strange foreign ways – and who Mike doesn’t really feel comfortable sharing his teenage desires and deepest fears with. He doesn’t even want to think about what it might mean if his mum never comes home from the hospital.

Based on his award-winning stand-up show, and the loss of his own mother when he was 12, Matt Okine’s coming-of-age novel, Being Black n Chicken and Chips, is a funny, heart-warming, and sometimes surreal look at how young people deal with grief, the loss of loved ones, and becoming an adult – all whilst desperately trying to fit in with the other kids.


The World That We Knew
Alice Hoffman

In Berlin, at the time when the world changed, Hanni Kohn knows she must send her twelve-year-old daughter away to save her from the Nazi regime. She finds her way to a renowned rabbi, but it’s his daughter, Ettie, who offers hope of salvation when she creates a mystical Jewish creature, a rare and unusual golem, who is sworn to protect Lea. Once Ava is brought to life, she and Lea and Ettie become eternally entwined, their paths fated to cross, their fortunes linked.

Lea and Ava travel from Paris, where Lea meets her soulmate, to a convent in western France known for its silver roses; from a school in a mountaintop village where three thousand Jews were saved. Meanwhile, Ettie is in hiding, waiting to become the fighter she’s destined to be.

What does it mean to lose your mother? How much can one person sacrifice for love? In a world where evil can be found at every turn, we meet remarkable characters that take us on a stunning journey of loss and resistance, the fantastical and the mortal, in a place where all roads lead past the Angel of Death and love is never ending.


There Was Still Love
Favel Parrett

Prague, 1938: Eva flies down the street from her sister. Suddenly a man steps out, a man wearing a hat. Eva runs into him, hits the pavement hard. His hat is in the gutter. His anger slaps Eva, but his hate will change everything, as war forces so many lives into small, brown suitcases.

Prague, 1980: No one sees Ludek. A young boy can slip right under the heavy blanket that covers this city – the fear cannot touch him. Ludek is free. And he sees everything. The world can do what it likes. The world can go to hell for all he cares because Babi is waiting for him in the warm flat. His whole world.

Melbourne, 1980: Mala Liska’s grandma holds her hand as they climb the stairs to their third floor flat. Inside, the smell of warm pipe tobacco and homemade cakes. Here, Mana and Bill have made a life for themselves and their granddaughter. A life imbued with the spirit of Prague and the loved ones left behind.

Favel Parrett’s deep emotional insight and stellar literary talent shine through in this love letter to the strong women who bind families together, despite dislocation and distance. It is a tender and beautifully told story of memory, family and love. Because there is still love. No matter what.


Ninth House
Leigh Bardugo

Galaxy ‘Alex’ Stern is the most unlikely member of Yale’s freshman class. Raised in the Los Angeles hinterlands by a hippie mom, Alex dropped out of school early and into a world of shady drug dealer boyfriends, dead-end jobs, and much, much worse. By age twenty, she is the sole survivor of a horrific, unsolved multiple homicide. Some might say she’s thrown her life away. But at her hospital bed, Alex is offered a second chance: to attend one of the world’s most elite universities on a full ride. What’s the catch, and why her?

Still searching for answers, Alex arrives in New Haven tasked by her mysterious benefactors with monitoring the activities of Yale’s secret societies, well-known to be haunts of the future rich and powerful. But their occult activities are revealed to be more sinister and more extraordinary than she ever imagined . . .

Welcome to a world of secret societies and the occult that’s perfect for fans of Deborah Harkness, Neil Gaiman, Susanna Clarke and Ben Aaronovitch.


Imaginary Friend
Stephen Chbosky

Imagine…
Leaving your house in the middle of the night.
Knowing your mother is doing her best,
but she’s just as scared as you.

Imagine…
Starting a new school, making friends.
Seeing how happy it makes your mother.
Hearing a voice, calling out to you.

Imagine…
Following the signs, into the woods.
Going missing for six days.
Remembering nothing about what happened.

Imagine…
Something that will change everything…
And having to save everyone you love.


After the Flood
Kassandra Montag

It’s 2031, and the world has been utterly transformed. After years of rising floodwaters, all that’s left is an archipelago of mountaintop colonies surrounded by a deep expanse of open water. Civilization as it once was is gone. Bands of pirates roam the waters, in search of goods and women to breed. Some join together to create a new kind of society, while others sail alone, barely surviving.

Myra and her young daughter, Pearl, survive by fishing from their small boat, visiting small hamlets and towns on dry land to trade for supplies and information. The sole purpose of Myra’s existence is to protect Pearl, while mourning the loss of her oldest daughter, Row, who was kidnapped during the last terrifying storm surge.

For eight years Myra has searched for the girl that she knows, in her bones and her heart, still lives. In a violent confrontation with a stranger, Myra hears that Row was last seen in a far-off encampment of raiders on the coast of what used to be Greenland. Throwing aside her usual caution, she and Pearl embark on a perilous voyage into the icy northern seas to rescue her.

A compulsively readable novel of dark despair and soaring hope, After the Flood is a magnificent, exhilarating, action-packed, and sometimes frightening odyssey laced with wonder – an affecting and wholly original saga, both redemptive and astonishing.


Akin
Emma Donoghue

Noah Selvaggio is a retired chemistry professor and widower living on the Upper West Side, but born in the South of France. He is days away from his long-awaited first trip back to Nice, but he receives a call from social services: Noah is the closest available relative of his eleven-year-old great-nephew and he urgently needs someone to take him in.

Plagued by guilt and a feeling of duty to his dead sister, Noah agrees to foster the kid ‘just for couple of weeks’ and takes him along on his visit to Nice. This unlikely duo, both feeling adrift in their lives and suffering from culture shock, argue about everything from steak frites to Snapchat.

Noah is disappointed by how much Nice has changed since he left. When sharp-eyed Michael identifies the historic Hotel Excelsior in one of Noah’s photographs, they decide to check in – but once inside their luxury suite, Noah’s perception of his ancestral heritage starts to crack.

Shocking stories of the Nazi occupation surface: a hotel re-purposed for torture, a secret resistance movement, and Noah’s mysterious mother on the front lines of history. As dark truths about this famous tourist mecca come to light, Noah learns to appreciate Michael’s street-smart wit and ease with technology. He finally grasps the great risks people in all ages have taken for their kin.


The Confession
Jessie Burton

One winter’s afternoon on Hampstead Heath in 1980, Elise Morceau meets Constance Holden and quickly falls under her spell. Connie is bold and alluring, a successful writer whose novel is being turned into a major Hollywood film.

Elise follows Connie to LA, a city of strange dreams and swimming pools and late-night gatherings of glamorous people. But whilst Connie thrives on the heat and electricity of this new world where everyone is reaching for the stars and no one is telling the truth, Elise finds herself floundering. When she overhears a conversation at a party that turns everything on its head, Elise makes an impulsive decision that will change her life forever.

Three decades later, Rose Simmons is seeking answers about her mother, who disappeared when she was a baby. Having learned that the last person to see her was Constance Holden, a reclusive novelist who withdrew from public life at the peak of her fame, Rose is drawn to the door of Connie’s imposing house in search of a confession …

From the million-copy bestselling author of The Miniaturist and The Muse, this is a luminous, powerful and deeply moving novel about secrets and storytelling, motherhood and friendship, and how we lose and find ourselves.


Wearing Paper Dresses
Anne Brinsden

You can talk about living in the Mallee. And you can talk about a Mallee tree. And you can talk about the Mallee itself: a land and a place full of red sand and short stubby trees. Silent skies. The undulating scorch of summer plains. Quiet, on the surface of things.

But Elise wasn’t from the Mallee, and she knew nothing of its ways.

Discover the world of a small homestead perched on the sunburnt farmland of northern Victoria. Meet Elise, whose urbane 1950s glamour is rudely transplanted to the pragmatic red soil of the Mallee when her husband returns to work the family farm. But you cannot uproot a plant and expect it to thrive. And so it is with Elise. Her meringues don’t impress the shearers, the locals scoff at her Paris fashions, her husband works all day in the back paddock, and the drought kills everything but the geraniums she despises.

As their mother withdraws more and more into herself, her spirited, tearaway daughters, Marjorie and Ruby, wild as weeds, are left to raise themselves as best they can. Until tragedy strikes, and Marjorie flees to the city determined to leave her family behind. And there she stays, leading a very different life, until the boy she loves draws her back to the land she can’t forget…


Warrior of the Altaii
Robert Jordan

Draw near and listen, or else time is at an end.

The watering holes of the Plain are drying up, the fearsome fanghorn grow more numerous, and bad omens abound. Wulfgar, a leader of the Altaii people, must contend with twin queens, warlords, prophets and magic in hopes of protecting his people and securing their future. Elspeth, a visitor from another world, holds the answers, but first Wulfgar must learn to ask the right questions.

But what if the knowledge that saves the Altaii will also destroy them?


The Red Hand: Stories, Reflections and the Last Appearance of Jack Irish
Peter Temple

Peter Temple started publishing novels late, when he was fifty, but then he got cracking. He wrote nine novels in thirteen years. Along the way he wrote screenplays, stories, dozens of reviews.

When Temple died in March 2018 there was an unfinished Jack Irish novel in his drawer. It is included in The Red Hand, and it reveals the master at the peak of his powers. The Red Hand also includes the screenplay of Valentine’s Day, an improbably delightful story about an ailing country football club, which in 2007 was adapted for television by the ABC. Also included are his short fiction, his reflections on the Australian idiom, a handful of autobiographical fragments, and a selection of his brilliant book reviews.

Peter Temple held crime writing up to the light and, with his poet’s ear and eye, made it his own incomparable thing.


CRIME & THRILLERS

SilverSilver
Chris Hammer

For half a lifetime, journalist Martin Scarsden has run from his past. But now there is no escaping. He’d vowed never to return to his hometown, Port Silver, and its traumatic memories. But now his new partner, Mandy Blonde, has inherited an old house in the seaside town and Martin knows their chance of a new life together won’t come again.

Martin arrives to find his best friend from school days has been brutally murdered, and Mandy is the chief suspect. With the police curiously reluctant to pursue other suspects, Martin goes searching for the killer. And finds the past waiting for him.

He’s making little progress when a terrible new crime starts to reveal the truth. The media descend on Port Silver, attracted by a story that has it all: sex, drugs, celebrity and religion. Once again, Martin finds himself in the front line of reporting.

Yet the demands of deadlines and his desire to clear Mandy are not enough: the past is ever present.

An enthralling and propulsive thriller from the acclaimed and bestselling author of Scrublands.


Bone ChinaBone China
Laura Purcell

Consumption has ravaged Louise Pinecroft’s family, leaving her and her father alone and heartbroken.

But Dr Pinecroft has plans for a revolutionary experiment: convinced that sea air will prove to be the cure his wife and children needed, he arranges to house a group of prisoners suffering from the same disease in the cliffs beneath his new Cornish home.

Forty years later, Hester Why arrives at Morvoren House to take up a position as nurse to the now partially paralysed and almost entirely mute Miss Pinecroft.

Hester has fled to Cornwall to try and escape her past, but surrounded by superstitious staff enacting bizarre rituals, she soon discovers that her new home may be just as dangerous as her last…


The Night FireThe Night Fire (Ballard & Bosch #3)
Michael Connelly

Back when Harry Bosch was just a rookie homicide detective he had an inspiring mentor, John Jack Thompson, who taught him to take the work personally and light the fire of relentlessness for every case. Now John Jack is dead and Harry inherits a murder book that Thompson took with him when he left the LAPD 20 years before — the unsolved killing of a troubled young man in an alley used for drug deals.

Bosch brings the murder book to Renée Ballard and asks her to help him find what about the case lit Thompson’s fire all those years ago. That will be their starting point.

The bond between Bosch and Ballard tightens as they become a formidable investigative team. And they soon arrive at a worrying question: Did Thompson steal the murder book to work the case in retirement, or to make sure it never got solved?


QuantumQuantum
Patricia Cornwell

On the eve of a top secret space mission, Captain Calli Chase detects a tripped alarm in the tunnels deep below a NASA research center. A NASA pilot, quantum physicist, and cybercrime investigator, Calli knows that a looming blizzard and government shutdown could provide the perfect cover for a sabotage, with deadly consequences.

As it turns out, the danger is worse than she thought. A spatter of dried blood, a missing security badge, a suspicious suicide — a series of disturbing clues point to Calli’s twin sister, Carme, who’s been MIA for days.

Desperate to halt the countdown to disaster and to clear her sister’s name, Captain Chase digs deep into her vast cybersecurity knowledge and her painful past, probing for answers to her twin’s erratic conduct. As time is running out, she realises that failure means catastrophe — not just for the space program but for the safety of the whole nation.


Agent Running in the FieldAgent Running in the Field
John Le Carre

Nat, a 47 year-old veteran of Britain’s Secret Intelligence Service, believes his years as an agent runner are over. He is back in London with his wife, the long-suffering Prue. But with the growing threat from Moscow Centre, the office has one more job for him. Nat is to take over The Haven, a defunct substation of London General with a rag-tag band of spies. The only bright light on the team is young Florence, who has her eye on Russia Department and a Ukrainian oligarch with a finger in the Russia pie.

Nat is not only a spy, he is a passionate badminton player. His regular Monday evening opponent is half his age: the introspective and solitary Ed. Ed hates Brexit, hates Trump and hates his job at some soulless media agency. And it is Ed, of all unlikely people, who will take Prue, Florence and Nat himself down the path of political anger that will ensnare them all. Agent Running in the Field is a chilling portrait of our time, now heartbreaking, now darkly humorous, told to us with unflagging tension by the greatest chronicler of our age.


Lying RoomThe Lying Room
Nicci French

Neve Connolly looks down at a murdered man. She doesn’t call the police.

‘You know, it’s funny,’ Detective Inspector Hitching said. ‘Whoever I see, they keep saying, talk to Neve Connolly, she’ll know. She’s the one people talk to, she’s the one people confide in.’

A trusted colleague and friend. A mother. A wife. Neve Connolly is all these things.

She has also made mistakes; some small, some unconsciously done, some large, some deliberate. She is only human, after all.  But now one mistake is spiralling out of control and Neve is bringing those around her into immense danger.

She can’t tell the truth. So how far is she prepared to go to protect those she loves? And who does she really know? And who can she trust?

A liar. A cheat. A threat. Neve Connolly is all these things. Could she be a murderer?


The GuardiansThe Guardians
John Grisham

He was framed for murder.  Now he needs someone on the outside to save him.

For 22 years Quincy Miller has sat on Death Row without friends, family or legal representation. He was accused of killing a Keith Russo, a lawyer in a small Florida town. But there were no witnesses and no motive. Just the fact that Quincy was black in an all-white town and that a blood-splattered torch was found in the boot of his car. A torch he swore was planted. A torch that conveniently disappeared from evidence just before his trial.

It made no difference. The police photographs of the torch were enough. In the eyes of the law Quincy is guilty and, no matter how often he protests his innocence, his punishment will be death.

Finally, after 22 years, an innocence lawyer and minister, Cullen Post, takes on his case. Post has exonerated eight men in the last ten years. He intends Quincy will become number nine.

But there were powerful and ruthless people behind Russo’s murder. They prefer that an innocent man goes to his death than one of them. They killed one lawyer 22 years ago, and they’ll kill another one without a second thought.


NON-FICTION

The BodyThe Body: A Guide for Occupants
Bill Bryson

In the bestselling, prize-winning A Short History of Nearly Everything Bill Bryson achieved the seemingly impossible by making the science of our world both understandable and entertaining to millions of people around the globe.

Now he turns his attention inwards to explore the human body, how it functions and its remarkable ability to heal itself. Full of extraordinary facts and astonishing stories The Body: A Guide for Occupants is a brilliant, often very funny attempt to understand the miracle of our physical and neurological make up.

A wonderful successor to A Short History of Nearly Everything, this book will have you marvelling at the form you occupy, and celebrating the genius of your existence, time and time again.


Buckley's ChanceBuckley’s Chance
Garry Linnell

He fought Napoleon’s army and survived.  He was sent to the gallows and escaped the noose.  Now he is in chains and on his way to the other side of the world. What happens next will become one of the most remarkable survival stories in history.

The 19th century has just begun. The world is at war. England, ruled by a mad king, is exiling thousands of criminals to an old land that has become its newest dumping ground.  One of those prisoners is William Buckley, barely 21, a former soldier sentenced to life for stealing two small pieces of cloth. He’s a giant for his times. But it’s not just his towering frame that sets him apart. It’s his desire for freedom that will make his story so unique – even in an era famous for outrageous acts of bravery and heroism.

On a moonlit night Buckley escapes and disappears into the Australian bush. Discovered and adopted by an aboriginal tribe who regard him as a ghost, he is initiated into their rich and complex culture. Given up for dead by his white captors, he will not be seen again for more than 30 years until he emerges one day…carrying a spear, dressed in animal skins and having forgotten the English language.

Buckley’s Chance is a profound journey into a turning point in history where cultures clash, bitter rivals go to war and the body count mounts.  It’s also the story of a man who refuses to be held down.  A man prepared to defy all odds and take a chance.

Buckley’s chance.


Confessions of a booksellerConfessions of a Bookseller
Shaun Bythell

‘Do you have a list of your books, or do I just have to stare at them?’

Shaun Bythell is the owner of The Bookshop in Wigtown, Scotland. With more than a mile of shelving, real log fires in the shop and the sea lapping nearby, the shop should be an idyll for bookworms.  Unfortunately, Shaun also has to contend with bizarre requests from people who don’t understand what a shop is, home invasions during the Wigtown Book Festival and Granny, his neurotic Italian assistant who likes digging for river mud to make poultices.

The Diary of a Bookseller (soon to be a major TV series) introduced us to the joys and frustrations of life lived in books. Sardonic and sympathetic in equal measure, Confessions of a Bookseller will reunite readers with the characters they’ve come to know and love.


Donna Hay Week LightWeek Light
Donna Hay

There are endless arguments out there for bringing more vegetables to your table – your own wellbeing, your budget, our environment, the list goes on. Whatever your personal reason, there’s one that I think is universal – FLAVOUR. Gone are the days where a sad salad or soft steamed carrots were our only options. These recipes use vegetables in a whole new way, adding so much life to your weekly routine. Who knew broccoli (in my mind the superfood of all vegetables) could make such a delicious pizza base, flat-bread or tart shell? Often for lunch, or even a snack, I’ll bake my super-green falafels in the oven and my studio team love them. As for my boys? Their current weeknight request is my crunchy raw pad thai – so yum.

Inside Week Light, you’ll find all these ideas and so much more. It’s essentially my week in food, in a book – super-quick, family-friendly, fuss-free meals made REAL. Vegetables are at the forefront of nearly every recipe, with a few meat options thrown in, and there are lots of my all-time classics re-worked to include more goodness. This book is about using food to refuel and re-energise, while nurturing ourselves with flavour. Happy cooking!


How to be a dictatorHow to be a Dictator
Frank Dikotter

No dictator can rule through fear and violence alone. Naked power can be grabbed and held temporarily, but it never suffices in the long term. A tyrant who can compel his own people to acclaim him will last longer. The paradox of the modern dictator is that he must create the illusion of popular support. Throughout the twentieth century, hundreds of millions of people were condemned to enthusiasm, obliged to hail their leaders even as they were herded down the road to serfdom.

In How to Be a Dictator, Frank Dikötter returns to eight of the most chillingly effective personality cults of the twentieth century. From carefully choreographed parades to the deliberate cultivation of a shroud of mystery through iron censorship, these dictators ceaselessly worked on their own image and encouraged the population at large to glorify them. At a time when democracy is in retreat, are we seeing a revival of the same techniques among some of today’s world leaders?

This timely study, told with great narrative verve, examines how a cult takes hold, grows, and sustains itself. It places the cult of personality where it belongs, at the very heart of tyranny.


GulpililGulpilil
Derek Rielly

It’s been almost fifty years since a teenage David Gulpilil illuminated screens worldwide with his breakout role in Walkabout. It was one of the first times we’d seen an Aboriginal person cast in a significant role and only four years after Holt’s referendum to alter the constitution and give Indigenous people citizenship and, subsequently, the right to vote.

Gulpilil quickly became the face of the Indigenous world to white Australian audiences. Charisma. Good looks. A competent, strong, mysterious man starring in films ranging from Crocodile Dundee to Rabbit-Proof Fence.

But what has marked Gulpilil, despite his fame and popularity, is the feeling that he’s been forever stuck between two worlds: a Yolngu man, a hunter, a tracker, who grew up in the bush in Arnhem Land outside any white influence; and a movie star flitting from movie sets to festivals.

Able to exist in both worlds, but never truly home.

From the author of the bestselling Wednesdays with Bob, Derek Rielly builds a narrative around his attempt to encapsulate the most beguiling and unconventional of Australian entertainers, observing Gulpilil’s own attempt to find a place in the world. With interviews from notable icons and friends – such as Jack Thompson, Paul Hogan, Phillip Noyce, Craig Ruddy, George Gittoes, Gary Sweet and Damon Gameau – this book unriddles a famous enigma at last.


Edible GardenThe Edible Garden Cookbook and Growing Guide
Paul West

For Paul West, a meaningful life is one built around food and community. In The Edible Garden Cookbook & Growing Guide, Paul shows you how easy it is to grow and cook some of your own food, no matter how much space you have.

Paul shares practical gardening advice, with guides on building a no-dig garden, composting and keeping chooks, and an A-Z guide of the veggies that are easiest to grow. There are also more than 50 of Paul’s favourite family recipes – simple, produce-driven dishes that are bursting with freshness and flavour. And then there are ideas for fun food activities to do with your community, whether it’s hosting a pickle party or passata day, brewing beer with some mates or whipping up a batch of homemade sausages.

The Edible Garden Cookbook & Growing Guide is a celebration of real food and vibrant community. It will inspire you to grow, cook and eat with those you love – and find real meaning along the way.


When All is said and doneWhen All is Said and Done
Neale Daniher

Neale Daniher sat down to pen a letter to the grandchildren he’ll never get to know. And then he kept on writing …

In 2013, the AFL legend was diagnosed with Motor Neurone Disease – a cruel and incurable disease. He knew he had a choice. He could spend his remaining time on earth focused on himself, or he could seize the opportunity to make a better future for others.

Neale is no stranger to challenge. He grew up on a farm in remote NSW, the third of eleven children. He battled injury during his football career with Essendon in the VFL/ AFL, then jumped on the coaching rollercoaster, leading Melbourne for a decade. As general manager of football operations, he was part of West Coast Eagles’ cultural rebuild.

From the hard-won wisdom of life on the land and the love of his family, to the triumphs and gutting lows of elite football, Neale has learnt to make the most of the cards he’s been dealt – to always live with purpose and to appreciate what he has.

True to form, Neale chose to stare down the disease he calls ‘The Beast’, and in 2014 he co-founded FightMND, an organisation that has since invested over $50 million into research and care initiatives. In 2015, he became the public face of the foundation’s biggest fundraising event, The Big Freeze.

When All is Said & Done is a book of stories and wisdom from a man who has always held his beliefs to the Bunsen burner of life. Neale is unflinchingly honest, sharing a timely reminder that, even though life doesn’t promise to be fair, we all have the power to choose how to make every day count.


Guest House for young widowsGuest House for Young Widows: Among the Women of Isis
Azadeh Moaveni

In early 2014, the Islamic State clinched its control of Raqqa in Syria. Baghdadi, the leader of ISIS, urged Muslims around the world to come join the caliphate. Witnessing the brutal oppression of the Assad regime in Syria, and moved to fight for justice, thousands of men and women heeded his call.

At the heart of this story is a cast of unforgettable young women who responded. Emma, from Germany; Sharmeena from Bethnal Green, London; Nour from Tunis: these were women–some still in high school–from urban families, some with university degrees and bookshelves filled with novels by Jane Austen and Dan Brown; many with cosmopolitan dreams of travel and adventure. But instead of finding a land of justice and piety, they found themselves trapped within the most brutal terrorist regime of the twenty-first century, a world of chaos and upheaval and violence.

What is the line between victim and collaborator? How do we judge these women who both suffered and inflicted intense pain? What role is there for Muslim women in the West? In what is bound to be a modern classic of narrative nonfiction, Moaveni takes us into the school hallways of London, kitchen tables in Germany, the coffee shops in Tunis, the caliphate’s OB/GYN and its “Guest House for Young Widows”–where wives of the fallen waited to be remarried–to demonstrate that the problem called terrorism is a far more complex, political, and deeply relatable one than we generally admit.


Face ItFace It
Debbie Harry

As a musician, an actor, a muse, an icon, the breadth of Debbie Harry’s impact on our culture has been matched by her almost Sphinx-like reticence about her inner life. Through it all – while being acclaimed as one of the most beautiful women in the world, prized by a galaxy of leading photographers and fashion designers, beloved by legions of fans for her relentless, high-octane performances, selling 50 million albums or being painted by Andy Warhol – Debbie Harry has infused her perennial Blondie persona with a heady mix of raw sexuality and sophisticated punk cool.

In Face It, Debbie Harry invites us into the complexity of who she is and how her life and career have played out over the last seven decades. Upending the standard music memoir, with a cutting-edge style keeping with the distinctive qualities of her multi-disciplined artistry, Face It includes a thoughtful introduction by Chris Stein, rare personal photos, original illustrations, fan artwork installations and more.

Peppered with colourful characters, Face It features everyone from bands Blondie came up with on the 1970s music scene – The Ramones, Television, Talking Heads, Iggy Pop and David Bowie – to artists like Jean-Michel Basquiat, Marina Abramovi and H.R. Giger of Alien fame. It explores her successful acting career (she has starred in over 30 film roles, including David Cronenberg’s Videodrome and John Waters’s Hairspray), her weekends with William S. Burroughs and her attempted abduction by serial killer Ted Bundy. Ranging from the hardscrabble grit and grime of the early New York City years to times of glorious commercial success, interrupted by a plunge into heroin addiction, the near-death of partner Chris Stein, a heart-wrenching bankruptcy and Blondie’s break-up as a band, an amazing solo career and then a stunning return with Blondie, this is a cinematic story of an artist who has always set her own path.

Inspirational, entertaining, shocking, humorous and eye-opening, Face It is a memoir as dynamic as its subject.


The Universe

The Universe
Lonely Planet

Let Lonely Planet take you further than ever before with the world’s first and only travel guide to the Universe. Developed with the latest data from NASA, we take you from our home on Earth and out into the far reaches of the solar system, then into our neighbouring stars and planetary systems, and finally into the rest of our galaxy and the Universe.

This fascinating journey will help you explore space as you would the world with a Lonely Planet guide. Unique to these pages are wonderful comparisons of Earth with the other worlds of our solar system and even those exoplanets orbiting other stars.

You’ll discover as much as we know about our celestial neighbourhood, and our place in it. In addition to planets and moons, get to know our Sun, explore the asteroid belt and the Kuiper Belt, and learn what lays beyond, in interstellar space. Outside our solar system, travel to some of the notable neighbouring stars, stellar systems and exoplanets we’ve discovered. You’ll understand how we search for planets where life might exist and the stars they orbit.

Finally, discover the edge of the observable Universe. Get to know the structure of the Milky Way as well as an orientation to neighbouring galaxies like the Andromeda Galaxy which is visible from Earth. Then explore other galactic formations and learn about galactic clusters and superclusters. By the end of the book, you’ll have a sense for the structure of the entire Universe as well as some of the big questions we still have as we ponder our place in it.


CoventryCoventry
Rachel Cusk

After the publication of Outline, Transit and Kudos – in which Rachel Cusk redrew the boundaries of fiction – this writer of uncommon brilliance returns with a series of essays that offers new insights on the themes at the heart of her life’s work.

Encompassing memoir and cultural and literary criticism, with pieces on gender, politics and writers such as D. H. Lawrence, Olivia Manning and Natalia Ginzburg, this collection is essential reading for our age: fearless, unrepentantly erudite, both startling and rewarding to behold.

The result is a cumulative sense of how the frank, deeply intelligent sensibility – so evident in her stories and novels – reverberates in the wider context of Cusk’s literary process. Coventry grants its readers a rare opportunity to see a mind at work that will influence literature for time to come.


Twas The nightshift before ChristmasTwas The Nightshift Before Christmas
Adam Kay

Christmas is coming, the goose is getting fat… but 1.4 million NHS staff are heading off to work. In this perfect present for anyone who has ever set foot in a hospital, Adam Kay delves back into his diaries for a hilarious and sometimes heartbreaking peek behind the blue curtain at Christmastime.

Twas the Nightshift Before Christmas is a love letter to all those who spend their festive season on the front line, removing babies and baubles from the various places they get stuck, at the most wonderful time of the year.

From the author of bestseller This is Going to Hurt.


Accidental tour guideThe Accidental Tour Guide: Adventures in Life and Death
Mary Moody

The irrepressible Mary Moody knows better than anyone the joy of breaking new ground and discovering new frontiers. She is the bestselling author of Au Revoir and Last Tango In Toulouse, and her life as a journalist, TV and radio presenter, popular gardening guru and inveterate traveller has been an inspiration to thousands of women for decades.

But when Moody loses two of the people she loves most – her beloved husband and the half sister she had only just been reunited with – her world is turned upside down. Part of her journey to recovery is her decision to boldly go where she has never been before – both in her travels as a tour guide and in her everyday life. This leads to exploring uncharted territories in Morocco and a wrenching move from her beloved mountain home and garden to make a fresh start while rediscovering her passions – travel, gardening, food, family and the joy of new adventures.

A warm, heartbreakingly moving and thoroughly entertaining story of how to rebuild your life without the people who matter most.


Penny WongPenny Wong: Passion and Principle
Margaret Simons

Senator Penny Wong is an extraordinary Australian politician. Resolute, self-possessed and a penetrating thinker on subjects from workplace relations to foreign affairs, she is admired by members of parliament and the public from across the political divide.

In this first-ever biography of Penny Wong, acclaimed journalist Margaret Simons traces her story- from her early life in Malaysia, to her student activism in Adelaide, to her time in the turbulent Rudd-Gillard-Rudd governments, to her leading role as a voice of reason and respect in the polarising campaign to legalise same-sex marriage. What emerges is a picture of a leader for modern Australia, a cool-headed, cautious yet charismatic figure of piercing intelligence and a personal history linking back to Australia’s colonial settlers through to its multicultural present.

Drawing on exclusive interviews with Penny Wong and her Labor colleagues, parliamentary opponents, close friends and family, this scintillating portrait of an Australian politician without precedence promises to be one of the most talked-about political biographies of the year.


Gotta Get Theroux thisGotta Get Theroux This
Louis Theroux

In 1994 fledgling journalist Louis Theroux was given a one-off gig on Michael Moore’s TV Nation, presenting a segment on apocalyptic religious sects. Gawky, socially awkward and totally unqualified, his first reaction to this exciting opportunity was panic. But he’d always been drawn to off-beat characters, so maybe his enthusiasm would carry the day. Or, you know, maybe it wouldn’t …

In his book, Louis takes the reader on a joyous journey through his life and unexpectedly successful career. Nervously accepting the BBC’s offer of his own series, he went on to create an award-winning documentary style that has seen him immersed in worlds as diverse as racist US militias and secretive pro-wrestlers, the violent gangs of Johannesburg and extreme drinkers in London. Arguably his biggest challenge was corralling celebrities in his When Louis Met series, with Jimmy Savile proving most elusive. Blindsided when the revelations about Savile came to light, Louis was to reflect again on the nature of evil he had spent decades uncovering.

Filled with wry observation, larger-than-life characters, and self-deprecating humour, this is Louis at his insightful and honest best.


UnfollowUnfollow
Megan Phelps-Roper

It was an upbringing in many ways normal. A loving home, shared with squabbling siblings, overseen by devoted parents. Yet in other ways it was the precise opposite: a revolving door of TV camera crews and documentary makers, a world of extreme discipline, of siblings vanishing in the night.

Megan Phelps-Roper was raised in the Westboro Baptist Church – the fire-and-brimstone religious sect at once aggressively homophobic and anti-Semitic, rejoiceful for AIDS and natural disasters, and notorious for its picketing the funerals of American soldiers. From her first public protest, aged five, to her instrumental role in spreading the church’s invective via social media, her formative years brought their difficulties. But being reviled was not one of them. She was preaching God’s truth. She was, in her words, ‘all in’.

In November 2012, at the age of twenty-six, she left the church, her family, and her life behind.

Unfollow is a story about the rarest thing of all: a person changing their mind. It is a fascinating insight into a closed world of extreme belief, a biography of a complex family, and a hope-inspiring memoir of a young woman finding the courage to find compassion for others, as well as herself.


488 Rules for LifeKitty Flanagan’s 488 Rules for Life
Kitty Flanagan

488 Rules for Life is Kitty Flanagan’s way of making the world a more pleasant place to live. Providing you with the antidote to every annoying little thing, these rules are not made to be broken.

488 Rules for Life is not a self-help book, because it’s not you who needs help, it’s other people. Whether they’re walking and texting, asphyxiating you on public transport with their noxious perfume cloud, or leaving one useless square of toilet paper on the roll, a lot of people just don’t know the rules.

But thanks to Kitty Flanagan’s comprehensive guide to modern behaviour, our world will soon be a much better place. A place where people don’t ruin the fruit salad by putting banana in it … where your co-workers respect your olfactory system and don’t reheat their fish curry in the office microwave … where middle aged men don’t have ponytails …

What started as a joke on Kitty Flanagan’s popular segment on ABC TV’s The Weekly, is now a quintessential reference book with the power to change society. (Or, at least, make it a bit less irritating.)

What people are (Kitty Flanagan is) saying about this book:

‘You’re welcome everyone.’
‘Thank god for me.’
‘I’d rather be sad and lonely, but right.’
‘There’s not actually 488 rules in here but it sure feels like it’.

This a book for anyone who believes good manners and common sense are the way forward. It’s time to make the world idiot-free and lovely.


Gordon Ramsay Quick and DeliciousGordon Ramsay Quick & Delicious
Gordon Ramsay

With unlimited access to recipes, why does anyone need another cookbook? Because not all recipes are born equal. Not all of them have been created by a global superstar chef who has built his reputation on delivering the very best food – whether that’s the ultimate fine dining experience at his 3 Michelin-star Restaurant Gordon Ramsay or the perfectly crafted burger from his Las Vegas burger joint.

Over the course of his stellar career, Gordon has learnt every trick in the trade to create dishes that taste fantastic and that can be produced without fail during even the most busy service. Armed with that knowledge, he has written an inspired collection of recipes for the time-pressed home cook who doesn’t want to compromise on taste or flavour.

The result is 100 tried and tested recipes that you’ll find yourself using time and again. All the recipes take 30 minutes or less and use readily available ingredients that are transformed into something special with Gordon’s expertise.


Art of Looking UpThe Art of Looking Up
Catherine McCormack

From the floating women and lotus flowers of the Senso-ji Temple in Japan, first painted in the year 645, through to the religious iconography that adorns places of worship from Vienna to Istanbul, all the way to bold displays like that in the lobby of Bellagio Hotel in Las Vegas, this book takes you on a tour of the extraordinary artworks that demand an alternative viewpoint.

Art History expert Catherine McCormack guides readers through the stories behind the artworks – their conception, execution, and the artists that visualised them. In many cases, these artworks also make bold but controlled political, religious or cultural statements, revealing much about the society and times in which they were created. First and foremost, this is a visual feast, but also a desirable art book that challenges readers to seek out fine art in more unusual places and question the statements they may be making.


Planet EarthPlanet Earth: Inspirations and Thoughts from a Planet Warrior
Bob Brown

In his first speech in the Senate, Bob Brown raised the threat posed by climate change. It has taken 10 years for politicians to finally begin to acknowledge the causes and effects of climate change.

Since 1996, Bob has continued to take a courageous, and often politically lonely, stand on issues around the saving of our planet, whether they have a local or international focus: saving Tasmania’s ancient forests, opposing the dumping of nuclear waste in Australia, protesting against Japanese whaling, the protection of rainforests and a host of other campaigns.

In 2010 Bob led the Australian Greens to a historic result with more than 1.6 million Australians voting for the Greens. In 2012 Bob stepped down as Leader of the Australian Greens, and then retired from the Senate. Since then he has continued to campaign on conservation issues across Australia and the world.

This book is both an inspiration and a call to action: Bob Brown’s words are a clear message on the issues facing our planet yet his positive approach is an inspiration to us all.


Finding the heart of the nationFinding the Heart of the Nation
Thomas Mayor

If Australia were a child, she would be traumatised by a past that she is told to forget. She has witnessed her custodians being murdered and raped, scattered to the margins of society. She suffers for what she has seen. She cannot forget. Her heart beat is fading.

This is a book for all Australians.

Since the Uluru Statement from the Heart was formed in 2017, Thomas Mayor has traveled around the country to promote its vision of a better future for Indigenous Australians. He’s visited communities big and small, often with the Uluru Statement canvas rolled up in a tube under his arm. Through the story of his own journey and interviews with 20 key people, Thomas taps into a deep sense of our shared humanity. The voices within these chapters make clear what the Uluru Statement is and why it is so important. And Thomas hopes you will be moved to join them, along with the growing movement of Australians who want to see substantive constitutional change. Thomas believes that we will only find the heart of our nation when the First peoples – the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders – are recognised with a representative Voice enshrined in the Australian Constitution.


Bake Australia GreatBake Australia Great
Katherine Sabbath

This mad-cap collection of edible Australiana will win over anyone with a love for the land of the Great Barrier Reef, Sydney Opera House and Big Banana. Style maven Katherine Sabbath’s deliciously witty cakes range from kitsch and cute, to stylish and sophisticated.

Start at Chapter One, Easy As, for beginner baking heaven. Enter stage left: the giant Fairy Bread Cake, Flamin’ Galah Cupcakes and Opal Cookies.

Progress to Chapter Two, She’ll Be Right, to create a Jaw-some man-eater from a dark chocolate sea salt cake. Engineer your own Sydney Opera House Pavlova or decorate a Dame Edna Koala.

Chapter Three, Advanced Australian Fare, is where you bust out a Mining Magnate (it’s rich!), build your own Great Aussie Dream Home or knock everyone’s socks off with Priscilla, Queen of the Dessert.

Sydney cake queen Katherine Sabbath is one of the coolest creatives around, loved for her cutting-edge cake designs and quirky personal style. This baking legend will teach you the tips and techniques to create maximum effect with every cake. Go ahead: bake her day.


Tall Tales Wee StoriesTall Tales and Wee Stories: The Best of Billy Connolly
Billy Connolly

‘Coming from Glasgow, it’s weird, I don’t really tell jokes, like Irish jokes and all that. I tell wee stories. And some of them don’t even have punchlines. But you’ll get used to it as the night goes on, and on, and on, and on and on…’

In December 2018, after 50-years of belly-laughs, energy, outrage and enjoyment, Billy Connolly announced his retirement from stand-up comedy. It had been an extraordinary career.

When he first started out in the late Sixties, Billy played the banjo in the folk clubs of Glasgow. Between songs, he would improvise a bit, telling anecdotes from the Clyde shipyard where he worked. In the process, he made all kinds of discoveries about what audiences found funny, from his own exaggerated body movements to the power of speaking explicitly about sex. He began to understand the craft of great storytelling too. Soon the songs became shorter and the monologues longer, and Billy quickly became recognised as one of the most exciting comedians of his generation.

Billy’s routines always felt spontaneous. He improvised, embellished and digressed as he went: a two-minute anecdote could become a 20-minute routine by the next night of a tour. And he brought a beautiful sense of the absurd to his shows as he riffed on holidays, alcohol, the crucifixion, or naked bungee jumping.

But Billy’s comedy could be laced with anger too. He hated pretentiousness and called out hypocrisy where ever he saw it. He loved to shock, and his startling appearance gave him license to say anything he damn well pleased about sex, politics or religion. It was only because he was so likeable that he got it away. Billy had the popular touch. His comedy spanned generations and different social tribes in a way that few others have ever managed.

Tall Tales and Wee Stories brings together the very best of Billy’s storytelling for the first time and includes his most famous routines including, The Last Supper, Jojoba Shampoo, Incontinence Pants and Shouting at Wildebeest. With an introduction and original illustrations by Billy throughout, it is an inspirational, energetic and riotously funny read, and a fitting celebration of our greatest ever comedian.


IndividualIndividual
Jessica Bellef

We all deserve to live unapologetically in homes that reflect who we are. Instead of a cookie-cutter approach, we crave spaces that make us feel secure and connected, nurtured and enriched.

Individual journeys to fifteen truly unique homes that are authentic reflections of the people who inhabit them, from an art-filled city terrace to a magical seaside shack and a 1970s-era palace in the ‘burbs.

Practical tips on such topics as choosing a palette, balancing function and style, and living better with ‘stuff’ show you how to imbue your space – whether a rented apartment or a cottage in the country – with the essence of you.

Individual is a stunning reminder that you don’t need a bulging bank account or an award-winning architect to create an authentic space in which you can thrive.


Beneath the surfaceBeneath the Surface
Libby Trickett

Australians know Libby Trickett as one of our golden girls of swimming. Winner of multiple Olympic gold medals and setter of world records, Libby wasn’t just a champion, she was Australia’s girl next door, the humble superstar from suburban Brisbane with the infectious grin and sunny nature.

Yet what we saw on the surface – the confidence, competitiveness and warmth that were her hallmarks – belied the very private battles she fought in her own head. Beneath the incredible achievements and that trademark smile, Libby suffered from crippling depression.

During her swimming career she managed to keep her demons more or less at bay, but when an injury forced her to retire in 2013 Libby was suddenly thrust into an unfamiliar world. With few, if any, qualifications to handle it, her self-doubts began to overwhelm her. The birth of her first baby added further complications to her fragile mental health, and she suffered intense postnatal depression. When she finally recognised the depression for what it was, and sought help for it, it was a major turning point in her life.

Libby’s memoir is an extraordinarily candid, revealing and inspiring account of both her public life as one of our greatest swimming champions, and her struggle to overcome her mental health challenges.


Concrete Houses The Poetics of FormConcrete Houses: The Poetics of Form
Joe Rollo

Concrete Houses explores the sculptural possibilities of concrete as the material of choice in landmark contemporary houses across Australia, Brazil, Portugal, Japan, Sweden, the Netherlands and the USA, from the hands of major international architects including Sou Fujimoto, Tom Kundig, Valerio Olgiati and Marcio Kogan, and Australians such as Peter Stutchbury, Alex Popov, Ian McDougall and Neil Durbach.

Illustrated throughout with exceptional colour photography, and selected plans and drawings, Concrete Houses celebrates the incontrovertible fusion of concrete’s versatility and brute force to make timeless architecture of lyric beauty.


Where Soldiers LieWhere Soldiers Lie
Ian McPhedran

Leave no man behind. What drives former soldiers to spend years searching for the remains of fallen warriors?

From the WWI battlefields of the Somme and Fromelles to the jungles of Papua New Guinea and Vietnam, this is the fascinating and moving story of the dogged hunt by two former diggers for the remains of Aussie soldiers listed as MIA in WWII and Vietnam. These extraordinary men – and a handful of others – will not rest until every Australian soldier who has died overseas serving their country is returned to Australian soil and their families.

It is a story of incredible determination against difficult odds, of exacting forensic analysis and painstaking detective work, to uncover and identify the remains of Australian soldiers, in battlefield over the decades, and to bring their remains home.

This will make for powerful, moving and compelling reading.


Step into ParadiseStep into Paradise
Linda Jackson & Jenny Kee

Step into Paradise explores the compelling stories and creative practice of iconic designers Jenny Kee and Linda Jackson, whose pioneering style created a bold and unashamedly Australian fashion identity.

Developed in close collaboration with Jenny and Linda, this first in-depth survey captures the dynamic energy of their partnership and draws on over four decades of their work and archives, including more than 150 garments, textiles, photographs and artworks.

The book’s vivid photography brings to life their exuberant designs, inspired by the colour and culture of Australia from flora and fauna to bush, reef and rainforest. The images sit alongside first-person pieces from Jenny and Linda, and contributions from key people who have known and collaborated with the designers. Step into Paradise celebrates the designers’ rainbow revolution that swept Australia off its feet and continues to enthral decades later.


Waves: Pro-surfers and their World
Thom Gilbert

Professional photographer Thom Gilbert spent four years among surfer royalty at the top of their game-in Spain, New York, California, and Hawaii-with his camera trained not only on tiny figures disappearing in the waves, but also on the surfers’ faces and bodies back on land. He returned from the beaches with intimate portraits of the world’s best-from the newest talent to the oldest and most revered-and also with dramatic action shots and revealing images of the culture around this sport and lifestyle.

The book features not only 300 photographs, but some Q&As with, and hand-written contributions from, prominent figures in the scene. Ultimately, Waves is an ode to surfing and to the men and women who live it every day.


Three Hours FromThree Hours From
Lonely Planet

From Austin to Bogota, Vienna to Wellington, discover the best day and weekend trips within three hours of 60 of Lonely Planet’s favourite cities. With sights, activities and hidden gems – all built around themes like art & culture, the outdoors, and food & drink – you’ll find amazing ideas for your next city escape or long stopover, as well as new experiences to enjoy near where you live.

Most of the 60 cities in this book could fill a lifetime with new experiences, but a short journey by either train, bus or car opens a world beyond to explore. In Three Hours From we hope to inspire you to look beyond the city limits for your next adventure. Whether you’re in Delhi, Vancouver, Brisbane or Rome, and whether you live there, work there, are on vacation or are simply passing through with a day to kill, we encourage you to widen your net.

Just an hour and 40 minutes from Cape Town you can spy breaching whales from the cliff path at Hermanus; within two hours of Manhattan you can be surfing at Rockaway Beach; and near Beijing you can choose between rafting a scenic gorge, visiting Jin-era temples or hiking along the Great Wall.

Each of the 60 cities is presented with a map of the surrounding area, pinpointed with up to 18 of the most exciting things to do within three hours travel time. These are colour-coded by theme so you can easily find what you’re interested in – be that outdoor pursuits, arts and culture, history, festivals and events, film and music, or food and drink.

Special sections include Africa’s best beach towns, Japan’s best onsen retreats, the best food & drink tours in North America, Europe’s finest off-the-beaten-track wineries, Oceania’s most fascinating indigenous experiences, and the top wildlife watching destinations in Latin America.


Feeding the birds at your tableFeeding the Birds at your Table
Darryl Jones

Millions of Australians feed wild birds in their gardens. Yet there is currently little information or advice on offer to tell them how to do this properly. This book provides the first readily available source of reliable information relevant to Australia. What’s more, it is written by an expert who feeds birds himself.

Including profiles on different types of Australian urban birds, what to feed them and the types of feeders to use, it also has advice on how to create a bird-friendly garden. Feeding the Birds at Your Table offers sensible and practical suggestions so feeding doesn’t only benefit us, but benefits the birds themselves.


Tony Wheeler's Islands of AustraliaTony Wheeler’s Islands of Australia
Tony Wheeler

Not just an island continent, Australia is a continent of islands. With over 8,000, it has more than the entire Caribbean.

Join seasoned traveller Tony Wheeler on a journey around the Australian coast and beyond to discover the stunning natural features, unique wildlife and chequered histories of Australia’s remarkable (and remarkably diverse) islets, cays, atolls and archipelagos.

Find out why the Whitsundays should have been called the Whitmondays, encounter Australia’s only known pirate, witness mutiny and murder on the Bounty and Batavia, meet giant lizards and friendly quokkas, and discover rich Indigenous cultures. Whether you’re an intrepid explorer, a simple sun-seeker or an armchair tourist, Islands of Australia will have you itching to visit.


Dark SkiesDark Skies
Lonely Planet

Witnessing the sweep of the Milky Way, the remains of comets burning up in our atmosphere, or the shimmering aurora, we better understand the universe and our place in it. Lonely Planet’s Dark Skies, the world’s first guide to astrotourism, can help you experience all of this and more first-hand.

Meticulously researched by dark sky expert Valerie Stimac, this comprehensive companion includes guides to 35 dark-sky sites and national parks, where to see the aurora, the next decade of total solar eclipses and how to view rocket launches, plus the lowdown on commercial space flight, observatories and meteor showers.

Dark Skies is divided into sections to help you plan your dark sky tour:

  1. Stargazing focuses on the basics of appreciating the dark sky, with an overview on how to stargaze and what types of objects to look for, as well as tips for the urban stargazer.
  2. Dark Places is devoted to 35 of the best places around the globe for stargazing and experiencing the night sky, including sites designated by the Dark Sky Association.
  3. Astronomy in Action features some of the world’s top research facilities and observatories,where you can get a closer look at space science.
  4. Meteor Showers has everything you need to know about the most consistent and impressive meteor showers that happen annually.
  5. Aurora is divided into two parts, one focusing on the aurora borealis in the northern hemisphere and the other on the aurora australis in the southern hemisphere.
  6. Eclipses follows the schedule of total solar eclipses over the next decade. If you’ve never experienced totality, here is your definitive guide to planning your trip.
  7. Launches helps you experience a different side of astrotourism: rocket launches and the countries that allow you to travel to see them.
  8. Space Tourism discusses the future of humans in space – including you! The major players in the evolving space tourism market are detailed, plus the world’s most common destinations and experiences.

Wild wild guruWild Wild Guru
Subhuti Anand Waight

This is the story of a Englishman who gave up a job in journalism to spend fourteen years with the controversial Indian mystic Osho, also known as Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh and frequently referred to as ‘the sex guru’.

His guru was always controversial with his teachings on sex and spirituality, rumours of orgies and because he owned ninety-three Rolls Royces.

Early in 1976, Subhuti travelled to India to meet Rajneesh in his ashram in Pune, became initiated as his disciple and immediately began to have mystical experiences, which he attributed to the powerful energy field surrounding the guru. He stayed for six months, participating in the ashram’s notorious Encounter Group and other therapies designed to release suppressed emotions and awaken sexual energy.

Subhuti would stay to live and work on his master’s ashrams for fourteen years, first as his press officer in Pune, India, then as editor of the community’s weekly newspaper when Bhagwan and his followers shifted to Oregon, USA, and built a whole new town on the massive Big Muddy Ranch.

There Subhuti was a first-hand witness to the scandals and hullabaloo that accompanied the guru, including tales of broken bones in no-holds-barred therapy groups and Tantra groups that encouraged total sexual freedom, and the increasing hostility with the locals which would lead to Bhagwan’s attempt to flee America, his arrest and imprisonment.

He was on the Oregon Ranch when Rajneesh’s secretary, Ma Anand Sheela, plotted against rival cliques within the ashram as well as a range of murderous crimes against state and federal officials which feature in hit Netflix series Wild Wild Country.

Yet, amidst it all, Subhuti could see the profound revolution in spirituality that Bhagwan was creating, leaving a lasting impact on our ideas about society, religion, meditation and personal transformation.

According to the author’s understanding, it was the controversy itself, plus Bhagwan’s refusal to tread the path of a spiritual saint, that became the stepping stone to a new vision of what it means to be a spiritual seeker.


Cabin Porn InsideCabin Porn: Inside
Zach Klein

Initially created by a group of friends as an online scrapbook, Cabin Porn became an international sensation following the publication of the first volume of photographs of hand-made homes in breath-taking natural landscapes around the world.

In this book, its creators delve deeper into the best-loved homes featured on the blog over the last ten years, offering close-ups of the stunning architecture and interior design that make them truly remarkable.

With more timeless photography and new design stories, Cabin Porn: Inside brings fresh inspiration for your quiet place somewhere.


Dustin Martin my story so farDustin Martin: My Story So Far…
Dustin Martin

A stunning illustrated companion to Dustin Martin’s stellar career, this book celebrates Australia’s most popular football player with never before published photos of his early life and behind-the-scenes moments. As a fully authorised publication, it’s the ultimate book for footy fans everywhere, from the most popular player in one of AFL’s most popular teams.

From his earliest moments as a small child, badgering his dad to get his very own footy; to the shy teenager who went to the draft expecting nothing; to winning the highest accolades; to behind the scenes at the club and out and about, this book is a revealing story of Dustin Martin’s rise to the very top of AFL football. Richmond fans as well as fans across the code will discover the true Dustin Martin revealed through stunning pictures.

Published to coincide with the end of the AFL season and to celebrate Dusty’s amazing career to date, this will be a must have, must give, must read for all footy fans.

SEPTEMBER NEW RELEASES

FICTION

Wife and the WidowThe Wife and the Widow
Christian White

Set against the backdrop of an eerie island town in the dead of winter, The Wife and the Widow is a mystery/thriller told from two perspectives: Kate, a widow whose grief is compounded by what she learns about her dead husband’s secret life; and Abby, an island local whose world is turned upside down when she’s forced to confront the evidence that her husband is a murderer. But nothing on this island is quite as it seems, and only when these women come together can they discover the whole story about the men in their lives.

Brilliant and beguiling, The Wife and the Widow takes you to a cliff edge and asks the question: how well do we really know the people we love?


Nothing VenturedNothing Ventured
Jeffrey Archer

This is not a detective story, this is a story about the making of a detective…

William Warwick has always wanted to be a detective, and decides, much to his father’s dismay, that rather than become a barrister like his father, Sir Julian Warwick QC, and his sister Grace, he will join London’s Metropolitan Police Force.

After graduating from university, William begins a career that will define his life: from his early months on the beat under the watchful eye of his first mentor, Constable Fred Yates, to his first high-stakes case as a fledgling detective in Scotland Yard’s arts and antiquities squad. Investigating the theft of a priceless Rembrandt painting from the Fitzmolean Museum, he meets Beth Rainsford, a research assistant at the gallery who he falls hopelessly in love with, even as Beth guards a secret of her own that she’s terrified will come to light.

While William follows the trail of the missing masterpiece, he comes up against suave art collector Miles Faulkner and his brilliant lawyer, Booth Watson QC, who are willing to bend the law to breaking point to stay one step ahead of William. Meanwhile, Miles Faulkner’s wife, Christina, befriends William, but whose side is she really on?

Nothing Ventured heralds the start of a brand new series in the style of Jeffrey Archer’s number one Sunday Times bestselling The Clifton Chronicles: telling the story of the life of William Warwick – as a family man and a detective who will battle throughout his career against a powerful criminal nemesis. Through twists, triumph and tragedy, this series will show that William Warwick is destined to become one of Jeffrey Archer’s most enduring legacies.


Wolfe IslandWolfe Island
Lucy Treloar

Kitty Hawke, the last inhabitant of a dying island sinking into the wind-lashed Chesapeake Bay, has resigned herself to annihilation…

Until one night her granddaughter blows ashore in the midst of a storm, desperate, begging for sanctuary. For years, Kitty has kept herself to herself – with only the company of her wolfdog, Girl – unconcerned by the world outside, or perhaps avoiding its worst excesses. But blood cannot be turned away in times like these. And when trouble comes following her granddaughter, no one is more surprised than Kitty to find she will fight to save her as fiercely as her name suggests…

A richly imagined and mythic parable of home and kin that cements Lucy Treloar’s place as one of our most acclaimed novelists.


Old LieThe Old Lie
Claire G. Coleman

Shane Daniels and Romany Zetz have been drawn into a war that is not their own. Lives will be destroyed, families will be torn apart. Trust will be broken.  When the war is over, some will return to a changed world. Will they discover that glory is a lie?

Claire G. Coleman’s new novel takes us to a familiar world to again ask us what we have learned from the past. The Old Lie might not be quite what you expect. A thrilling and ambitious new novel from the author of the bestselling and prize-winning Terra Nullius.


Girl Who Lived TwiceThe Girl Who Lived Twice (Millenium #6)
David Lagercrantz

“What will you do now?”
“I shall be the hunter and not the hunted”

The girl with the dragon tattoo is finally ready to confront her nemesis, the only woman who is evidently and in many ways her match. Salander will not wait to be hunted. When she strikes it will be a double blow: vengeance for recent atrocities, and the settling of lifelong scores.

For months now Salander has been closing in on her target. She has moved from Stockholm, her hair is newly styled, her piercings are gone. She could pass for any other businesswoman. But not all businesswomen have a Beretta Cheetah beneath their jacket. They do not wield the lethal power of a hacker’s genius. They do not carry scars and tattoos to remind them that they have survived the unsurvivable.

The new episode in David Lagercrantz’s acclaimed, internationally bestselling continuation of Stieg Larsson’s Dragon Tattoo series is a thrilling ride that scales the heights of Everest and plunges the depths of Russian troll factories. It begins with the discovery of Mikael Blomkvist’s number at Millennium magazine in the pocket of an unidentified homeless man who died with the name of a government minister on his lips.

Blomkvist, at extreme risk to himself, tracks down his old friend and will protect her as far as he can. But he is powerless to crush her enemies on his own.

And for Lisbeth Salander, the personal is always political – and deadly.


Ten Thousand Doors of JanuaryTen Thousand Doors of January
Alix E. Harrow

Every Story Opens a Door

In a house filled with exotic treasures, January Scaller feels all too similar to the artefacts that decorate the shelves: a treasured object, carefully maintained yet utterly out of place. Largely ignored by her guardian, she spends her days reading about all the far-flung places she can only dream of visiting.

But her quiet existence is shattered when she stumbles across a strange book. A book that carries the scent of other worlds and tells a tale of secret doors, of love, adventure and danger. Each page reveals impossible truths about the world and January discovers a story that might just be the key to unlocking the secrets of her past.


How the Dead SpeakHow the Dead Speak
Val McDermid

After an explosive case that forced Tony Hill and Carol Jordan to reassess everything they thought they knew about right and wrong, both are dealing with the fallout in their own separate ways. While Tony must pay the price for his actions, Carol is conducting investigations into suspected miscarriages of justice.

But when a shocking discovery is made on a construction site, and skeletal remains are found to belong to a killer who is supposedly alive and in prison, suddenly, Tony and Carol are brought into each other’s orbit once again . . .

The next eagerly anticipated, electrifying thriller from number one bestseller and queen of crime, Val McDermid, featuring the unforgettable Tony Hill and Carol Jordan.


Rich Man's HouseThe Rich Man’s House
Andrew McGahan

In the freezing Antarctic waters south of Tasmania, a mountain was discovered in 1642 by the seafaring explorer Gerrit Jansz. Not just any mountain but one that Jansz estimated was an unbelievable height of twenty-five thousand metres.

In 2016, at the foot of this unearthly mountain, a controversial and ambitious ‘dream home’, the Observatory, is painstakingly constructed by an eccentric billionaire – the only man to have ever reached the summit.

Rita Gausse, estranged daughter of the architect who designed the Observatory is surprised, upon her father’s death, to be invited to the isolated mansion to meet the famously reclusive owner, Walter Richman. But from the beginning, something doesn’t feel right. Why is Richman so insistent that she come? What does he expect of her?

When cataclysmic circumstances intervene to trap Rita and a handful of other guests in the Observatory, cut off from the outside world, she slowly begins to learn the unsettling – and ultimately horrifying – answers.

The Rich Man’s House, Andrew McGahan’s eleventh and final novel, is a gripping and unique thriller.


Dutch HouseThe Dutch House
Ann Patchett

Danny Conroy grows up in the Dutch House, a lavish folly in small-town Pennsylvania taken on by his property developer father. Though his father is distant and his mother is absent, Danny has his beloved sister Maeve: Maeve, with her wall of black hair, her delicacy, her brilliance. Life is comfortable and coherent, played out under the watchful eyes of the house’s former owners in the frames of their oil paintings, or under the cover of the draperies around the window seat in Maeve’s room.

Then one day their father brings Andrea home: Andrea, small and neat, a dark hat no bigger than a saucer pinned over a twist of her fair hair. Though they cannot know it, Andrea’s advent to the Dutch House sows the seed of the defining loss of Danny and Maeve’s lives. Her arrival will exact a banishment: a banishment whose reverberations will echo for the rest of their lives.

For all that the world is open to him, for all that he can accumulate, for all that life is full, Danny and his sister are drawn back time and again to the place they can never enter, knocking in vain on the locked door of the past. For behind the mystery of their own enforced exile is that of their mother’s self-imposed one: an absence more powerful than any presence they have known.

Told with Ann Patchett’s inimitable blend of wit and heartbreak, The Dutch House is a story of family, betrayal, love, responsibility and sacrifice; of the powerful bonds of place and time that magnetize and repel us for our whole lives, and the lives of those who survive us.


The TruantsThe Truants
Kate Weinberg

People disappear when they most want to be seen.

Jess Walker, middle child of a middle class family, has perfected the art of vanishing in plain sight. But when she arrives at a concrete university campus under flat, grey, East Anglian skies, her world flares with colour.

Drawn into a tightly-knit group of rule breakers – led by their maverick teacher, Lorna Clay – Jess begins to experiment with a new version of herself. But the dynamic between the friends begins to darken as they share secrets, lovers and finally a tragedy. Soon Jess is thrown up against the question she fears most: what is the true cost of an extraordinary life?


Darkdawn (Nevernight #3)
Jay Kristoff

Mia Corvere, gladiatii, escaped slave and infamous assassin, is on the run.

After the greatest games in Godsgrave’s history ended with the most audacious murders in the history of the Itreyan Republic, Mia finds herself pursued by Blades of the Red Church and soldiers of the Luminatii legion. She may never escape the City of Bridges and Bones alive.

Her mentor Mercurio is now in the clutches of her enemies. Her own family wishes her dead. And her nemesis, Consul Julius Scaeva, stands but a breath from total dominance over the Republic.

But beneath the city, a dark secret awaits. Together with her lover Ashlinn, brother Jonnen and a mysterious benefactor returned from beyond the veil of death, she must undertake a perilous journey across the Republic, seeking the final answer to the riddle of her life. Truedark approaches.

Night is falling on the Republic for perhaps the final time.


A Single ThreadA Single Thread
Tracy Chevalier

It is 1932, and the losses of the First World War are still keenly felt. Violet Speedwell, mourning for both her fiancé and her brother and regarded by society as a ‘surplus woman’ unlikely to marry, resolves to escape her suffocating mother and strike out alone.

A new life awaits her in Winchester. Yes, it is one of draughty boarding-houses and sidelong glances at her naked ring finger from younger colleagues; but it is also a life gleaming with independence and opportunity. Violet falls in with the broderers, a disparate group of women charged with embroidering kneelers for the Cathedral, and is soon entwined in their lives and their secrets. As the almost unthinkable threat of a second Great War appears on the horizon Violet collects a few secrets of her own that could just change everything…

Warm, vivid and beautifully orchestrated, A Single Thread reveals one of our finest modern writers at the peak of her powers.


The TestamentsThe Testaments
Margaret Atwood

When the van door slammed on Offred’s future at the end of The Handmaid’s Tale, readers had no way of telling what lay ahead.

With The Testaments, the wait is over.

Margaret Atwood’s sequel picks up the story 15 years after Offred stepped into the unknown, with the explosive testaments of three female narrators from Gilead.  Joint winner of the 2019 Booker Prize.


QuichotteQuichotte
Salman Rushdie

Quichotte, an ageing travelling salesman obsessed with TV, is on a quest for love. Unfortunately, his daily diet of reality TV, sitcoms, films, soaps, comedies and dramas has distorted his ability to separate fantasy from reality. He wishes an imaginary son into existence, while obsessively writing love letters to a celebrity he knows only through his screen. Quichotte’s story is narrated by Brother, a mediocre spy novelist in the midst of a midlife crisis, triggered in part by a fall-out with his Sister. As the stories of Brother and Quichotte ingeniously intertwine, Salman Rushdie takes us on a wild, picaresque journey through a world on the edge of moral and spiritual collapse.

Quichotte is one of the world’s great storytellers at his exuberant best, in a book that highlights the instability of the world we live in and speaks to an era when fact is often indiscernible from fiction.  Shortlisted for the 2019 Booker Prize.


NON FICTION

How Powerful We AReHow Powerful We Are
Sally Rugg

Even if you’re not an activist (yet), at a time when the news is written for clicks and elections are fought with three-word slogans, it’s crucial to preserve some record of events that isn’t ‘fake news’ or political spin. In part, this book is my attempt to counter the re-writing of how Australia achieved one of the most significant social changes in a generation.

Sally Rugg is one of Australia’s most influential campaigners for social change. How Powerful We Are is her manifesto for championing what you believe is right.

In these pages Sally will teach you some of the things she learnt on the marriage equality campaign: how to develop a strategy, how to frame your messages, how to get your campaign to the media, how to build community power. And she’ll share with you the much harder lessons learnt: the consequences of campaign decisions; how to weather criticism and harassment from every angle; and how, in mass campaign movements, nothing is black and white.


Whole Fish CookbookThe Whole Fish Cookbook
Josh Niland

We all want to eat more fish, but who wants to bother spending the time, effort and money cooking that same old salmon fillet on repeat when you could be trying something new and utterly delicious?

In The Whole Fish Cookbook, Sydney’s groundbreaking seafood chef Josh Niland reveals a completely new way to think about all aspects of fish cookery. From sourcing and butchering to dry ageing and curing, it challenges everything we thought we knew about the subject and invites readers to see fish for what it really is – an amazing, complex source of protein that can, and should, be treated with exactly the same nose-to-tail reverence as meat.

Featuring more than 60 recipes for dozens of fish species ranging from Cod Liver Pate on Toast, Fish Cassoulet and Roast Fish Bone Marrow to – essentially – the Perfect Fish and Chips, The Whole Fish Cookbook will soon have readers seeing that there is so much more to a fish than just the fillet and that there are more than just a handful of fish in the sea.


Melbourne Pocket PrecinctsMelbourne Pocket Precincts
Dale Campisi & Brady Michaels

Melbourne is a city of proud locals, and visitors who wish they lived here. Whether by bike or by tram, explore the lively streets and beautiful green spaces; it’s no wonder Melbourne has long been considered one of the most livable cities in the world. Culture reigns supreme with world-class museums, galleries, street art and a topnotch food and coffee scene. Browse with the Collins Street elite or vintage shop-hop through Collingwood and Prahran, then finish the day with a fine wine on one of the CBD’s many rooftop bars.

Melbourne Pocket Precincts is your curated guide to the city’s best cultural, shopping, eating and drinking experiences, from the grunge of Fitzroy to the seaside vibes of St Kilda. As well as detailed reviews and maps for major attractions through to hidden gems, this guide includes a selection of field trips encouraging you to venture outside the city to the Dandenong Ranges and Yarra Valley vineyards, the picturesque Mornington Peninsula, the iconic Great Ocean Road and the historic Goldfields. Slip this guide into your pocket and head off on an adventure, experiencing the coolest places in Melbourne and surrounds, like a local.


Almost Lost ArtsAlmost Lost Arts
Emily Freidenrich

Since the Industrial Revolution, humans have been mechanising and digitising processes previously done by hand. But craftsmanship isn’t lost to the footnotes of history. Meet the makers, fixers, and collectors dedicated to preserving traditional handicrafts. Brittany Nicole Cox repairs antique clocks; Anita Rodríguez and Joanna Keane Lopez build and preserve traditional adobe structures; Simon Vernon roves the British countryside drawing maps by hand; Lee Eun Bum maintains a ceramic tradition from tenth-century Korea.

Almost Lost Arts pays tribute to these artisans, celebrating human ingenuity and tactile beauty. Twenty in-depth profiles and stunning full-colour photography transport the reader to workshops across the globe, from Kyoto to Oaxaca, and from Milan to Tennessee. Two essays – by a calligraphy expert and the curator of Harvard’s Forbes Pigment Library, respectively – explore the experience of engaging deeply with tradition. The book is lovingly curated by Emily Freidenrich and features a deluxe three-piece case with foil stamping.


The GirlsThe Girls
Chloe Higgins

In 2005, Chloe Higgins was seventeen years old. She and her mother, Rhonda, stayed home so that she could revise for her exams while her two younger sisters Carlie and Lisa went skiing with their father. On the way back from their trip, their car veered off the highway, flipped on its side and burst into flames. Both her sisters were killed. Their father walked away from the accident with only minor injuries.

This book is about what happened next.

In a memoir of breathtaking power, Chloe Higgins describes the heartbreaking aftermath of that one terrible day. It is a story of grieving, and learning to leave grief behind, for anyone who has ever loved, and lost.


Devil's GripThe Devil’s Grip
Neal Drinnan

Seven shots ring out in the silence of Victoria’s rolling Barrabool Hills. As the final recoil echoes through the paddocks, a revered sheep-breeding dynasty comes to a bloody and inglorious end.

No one could have anticipated the orgy of violence that wiped out three generations of the Wettenhall family, much less the lurid scandals about Darcy Wettenhall, the man behind the world famous Stanbury sheep stud, that would emerge from the aftermath.

Almost three decades later, the web of secrets and lies that led to this bizarre and seemingly motiveless murder spree are unravelled with the help of Bob Perry, Darcy Wettenhall’s secret lover for a decade prior to his murder.

From the bucolic majesty, privilege and snobbery of the Western District’s prized pastoral lands and dynasties to the bleak, loveless underworld of orphanages, rodeo stables and homeless shelters, The Devil’s Grip is a courageous and thought-provoking meditation on the fragility of reputation, the folly of deception and the power of shame.


Animal LanguagesAnimal Languages: The Secret Conversations of the Living World
Eva Meijar

Dolphins and parrots call each other by their names. Fork tailed drongos mimic the calls of other animals to scare them away and then steal their dinner. In the songs of many species of birds, and in skin patterns of squid, we find grammatical structures…

If you are lucky, you might meet an animal that wants to talk to you. If you are even luckier, you might meet an animal that takes the time and effort to get to know you. Such relationships can teach us not only about the animal in question, but also about language and about ourselves.

From how prairie dogs describe intruders in detail — including their size, shape, speed and the colour of their hair and T-shirts — to how bats like to gossip, to the impressive greeting rituals of monogamous seabirds, Animal Languages is a fascinating and philosophical exploration of the ways animals communicate with each other, and with us.

Researchers are discovering that animals have rich and complex languages with grammatical and structural rules that allow them to strategise, share advice, give warnings, show love and gossip amongst themselves. Animal Languages will reveal this surprising hidden social life and show you how to talk with the animals.


Courtyard LivingCourtyard Living
Charmaine Chan

Courtyards have long played an important function in residential design, regulating light, shade and the use of space. With centuries of tradition as inspiration, contemporary architects are now realizing courtyard living afresh. This lavish survey of 25 residences across the Asia-Pacific region features homes from Australia, Taiwan, Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, the Philippines, Singapore, India, Vietnam and Sri Lanka.

Structured by courtyard function, the book consists of five chapters – on privacy; social spaces; sightlines; air, light and shade; and blurring boundaries – that are richly illustrated with photography as well as architectural illustrations showing the position of the courtyard within the floor plan.

Showcasing the unique lifestyle opportunities afforded by contemporary courtyard design, this is an inspirational resource for anyone interested in indoor-outdoor living.


Night FishingNight Fishing
Vicki Hastrich

Vicki Hastrich takes the reader on a stunning voyage through her writer’s life and across her chosen patch: the private byways of Brisbane Water, north of Sydney, where she has spent much of her life.

Hastrich’s ability to draw on her own experience and to fuse her intimate, loving knowledge of a tiny arena of Australia’s natural world with the grand influence of ideas from throughout civilization – from the Baroque to the American Western, from artists as diverse as Zane Grey, Tiepolo and Goya – make this collection a truly original and deeply pleasurable reading experience.

Night Fishing unfolds as a series of expeditions or essays, undertaken in the spirit of the philosopher scientist. All the while, slowly, thoughtfully, Hastrich reveals the ordinary and remarkable detail of her life, from her childhood by the sea to her life as a camera operator for the ABC, as a historian and amateur marine biologist, and as a single woman exploring her small stretch of water.

The result is entirely new, entirely fresh and profoundly captivating. Night Fishing is a tonic for those of us who have forgotten how to slow down, how to look around, how to be part of our natural world. It will take its place alongside classics of observation and nature by David Malouf, Tim Winton and Annie Dillard.


Year of the MonkeyYear of the Monkey
Patti Smith

Following a run of New Year’s concerts at San Francisco’s legendary Fillmore, Patti Smith finds herself tramping the coast of Santa Cruz, about to embark on a year of solitary wandering. Unfettered by logic or time, she draws us into her private wonderland, with no design yet heeding signs, including a talking sign that looms above her, prodding and sparring like the Cheshire Cat. In February, a surreal lunar year begins, bringing with it unexpected turns, heightened mischief, and inescapable sorrow. In a stranger’s words, “Anything is possible: after all, it’s the year of the monkey.” For Patti Smith – inveterately curious, always exploring, tracking thoughts, writing the year evolves as one of reckoning with the changes in life’s gyre: with loss, aging, and a dramatic shift in the political landscape of America.

Smith melds the Western landscape with her own dreamscape. Taking us from Southern California to the Arizona desert; to a Kentucky farm as the amanuensis of a friend in crisis; to the hospital room of a valued mentor; and by turns to remembered and imagined places – this haunting memoir blends fact and fiction with poetic mastery. The unexpected happens; grief and disillusionment. But as Patti Smith heads toward a new decade in her own life, she offers this balm to the reader: her wisdom, wit, gimlet eye, and above all, a rugged hope of a better world.

Riveting, elegant, often humorous, illustrated by Smith’s signature Polaroids, Year of the Monkey is a moving and original work, a touchstone for our turbulent times.


The AnarchyThe Anarchy: Relentless Rise of the East India Company
William Dalrymple

In August 1765 the East India Company defeated and captured the young Mughal emperor and forced him to set up in his richest provinces a new government run by English traders who collected taxes through means of a vast and ruthless private army.

The creation of this new government marked the moment that the East India Company ceased to be a conventional international trading corporation, dealing in silks and spices, and became something much more unusual: an aggressive colonial power in the guise of a multinational business. In less than half a century it had trained up a private security force of around 260,000 men – twice the size of the British army – and had subdued an entire subcontinent, conquering first Bengal and finally, in 1803, the Mughal capital of Delhi itself. The Company’s reach stretched relentlessly until almost all of India south of the Himalayas was effectively ruled from a boardroom in London.

The Anarchy tells the remarkable story of how one of the world’s most magnificent empires disintegrated and came to be replaced by a dangerously unregulated private company, based thousands of miles overseas and answerable only to its shareholders. In his most ambitious and riveting book to date, William Dalrymple tells the story of the East India Company as it has never been told before, unfolding a timely cautionary tale of the first global corporate power.

Three hundred and fifteen years after its founding, with a corporate Mogul now sitting in the White House, the story of the East India Company has never been more current.


About a GirlAbout a Girl
Rebekah Robertson

In 2000, Rebekah gave birth to twin boys, George and Harry. But as they grew older, their preferences began to show, and by the age of three it was clear Georgie was drawn to anything that was pretty or had a skirt that could swirl.

Before long Georgie was insisting that she was a girl and became distressed that she had to hide who she really was when she began school. Soon the bullying started and she would come home in floods of tears, begging her mother to help her.

Rebekah and her husband, conflicted about how to proceed and overwhelmed by fear, united in their determination to help her live freely and fearlessly. To ensure Georgie had access to medical support they sought permission for her to begin puberty-blocking medication. Their case was the start of the long road to justice for transgender children in Australia and became the basis of the 2013 landmark decision to remove the Family Court’s jurisdiction.

Georgie has gone on to become one of the brightest stars of the Australian youth leadership landscape through her advocacy work. And Rebekah founded Transcend, a support network for transgender kids and their families in Australia.

Part memoir and part inspirational message of hope for those navigating a similar path, About a Girl is a thought-provoking and profoundly moving true story. Above all, it is a celebration of family and the values that unite us all.


Sand TalkSand Talk: How Indigenous Thinking Can Save the World
Tyson Yunkaporta

What happens when global systems are viewed from an Indigenous perspective? How does it affect the way we see history, money, power and learning? Could it change the world?

This remarkable book is about everything from echidnas to evolution, cosmology to cooking, sex and science and spirits to Schrodinger’s cat.

Tyson Yunkaporta looks at global systems from an Indigenous perspective. He asks how contemporary life diverges from the pattern of creation. How does this affect us? How can we do things differently?

Sand Talk provides a template for living. It’s about how lines and symbols and shapes can help us make sense of the world. It’s about how we learn and how we remember. It’s about talking to everybody and listening carefully. It’s about finding different ways to look at things.

Most of all it’s about Indigenous thinking, and how it can save the world.


First, They Erased Our NameFirst, They Erased Our Name: A Rohingya Speaks
Habiburahman with Sophie Ansel 

Habiburahman was born in 1979 and raised in a small village in western Burma. When he was three years old, the country’s military leader declared that his people, the Rohingya, were not one of the 135 recognised ethnic groups that formed the eight ‘national races’. He was left stateless in his own country.

Since 1982, millions of Rohingya have had to flee their homes as a result of extreme prejudice and persecution. In 2016 and 2017, the government intensified the process of ethnic cleansing, and over 600,000 Rohingya people were forced to cross the border into Bangladesh.

Here, for the first time, a Rohingya speaks up to expose the truth behind this global humanitarian crisis. Through the eyes of a child, we learn about the historic persecution of the Rohingya people and witness the violence Habiburahman endured throughout his life until he escaped the country in 2000, eventually reaching Australia by boat in December 2009. He spent nearly three years in detention centres before being released, and now lives in Melbourne.

First, They Erased Our Name is an urgent, moving memoir about what it feels like to be repressed in one’s own country and a refugee in others. It gives voice to the voiceless.


We Are The WeatherWe are the Weather
Jonathan Safran Foer

Most books about the environmental crisis are densely academic, depressingly doom-laden and crammed with impersonal statistics. We are the Weather is different – accessible, immediate and with a single clear solution that individual readers can put into practice straight away.

A significant proportion of global carbon emissions come from farming meat. Giving up meat is incredibly hard and nobody is perfect – but just cutting back is much easier and still has a huge positive effect on the environment. Just changing our dinners – cutting out meat for one meal per day – is enough to change the world.

With his distinctive wit, insight and humanity, Foer frames this essential debate as no one else could, bringing it to vivid and urgent life.


Talking to StrangersTalking to Strangers
Malcolm Gladwell

In July 2015, a young black woman named Sandra Bland was pulled over for a minor traffic violation in rural Texas. Minutes later she was arrested and jailed. Three days later, she committed suicide in her cell. What went wrong? Talking to Strangers is all about what happens when we encounter people we don’t know, why it often goes awry, and what it says about us.

How do we make sense of the unfamiliar? Why are we so bad at judging someone, reading a face, or detecting a lie? Why do we so often fail to ‘get’ other people?

Through a series of puzzles, encounters and misunderstandings, from little-known stories to infamous legal cases, Gladwell takes us on a journey through the unexpected. You will read about the spy who spent years undetected at the highest levels of the Pentagon, the man who saw through the fraudster Bernie Madoff, the suicide of the poet Sylvia Plath and the false conviction of Amanda Knox. You will discover that strangers are never simple.

No one shows us who we are like Malcolm Gladwell. Here he sets out to understand why we act the way we do, and how we all might know a little more about those we don’t.


On FireOn Fire
Naomi Klein

The fight for a green world is the fight of our lives. And with On Fire, Naomi Klein gives us the ammunition to do it.

In frank, personal terms, she shows us how the only way forward out of a polluted world of our own making is only through policy reform – a concrete set of actions to combat the mounting threat of total environmental catastrophe. What’s needed, she argues, is something with radical verve and guaranteed protections: in other words, a New Deal.

On Fire finds Klein at her most canny and prophetic, and the stakes of our imperiled global situation higher than ever before. In wide-ranging essays reporting from varying stages of ecological crisis – from prescient clarion calls from years ago to our panicked present – Klein wakes us up from our environmental sleepwalk and sets us on a course of potent, necessary action.


Chyka CelebrateChyka Celebrate
Chyka Keebaugh

In Chyka Celebrate, Chyka Keebaugh celebrates occasions from around the world and shares tips, inspiration and suggestions for hosting the perfect themed event. Covering occasions as diverse as Chinese New Year, Eid, Jewish New Year, Mother’s Day, Halloween, Thanksgiving, New Year’s Eve and Easter, Chyka shows readers how themed entertaining is done with minimum hassle and at low cost, independent of the location – all in her signature, accessible style.

Organised into thirteen chapters by event, each section provides creative suggestions for decoration, food and drinks, invitations and small gifts, and provides insights into the charming customs common at many of our holidays and festivals. Beautifully photographed and illustrated, Chyka Celebrate is the perfect manual for themed entertaining in style throughout the year.

2019 Children’s Book Week and Story Writing Competition Winners

We were delighted to kick off our celebrations for Children’s Book Week yesterday with a visit from the lovely Jane Godwin and the announcement of our Story Competition Winners for 2019.  What an absolutely bumper crowd we had?!  Thanks so much to everyone who was able to come down and enjoy the afternoon’s festivities.

CBW2019

Jane Godwin very generously spoke with us about her own writing approach and ideas and gave the kids her Top 10 Tips for Young Writers, which are a great reference for everyone putting their entries together for next year!

Story Competition Winners

We had more than 200 entries this year from Prep through to Year 12 – it is always such a difficult task to whittle all the wonderful stories down to just a few winners.  All entrants receive a certificate of participation, which can be collected in store until the end of October 2019.

This year’s winners and honourable mentions in each age category were as follows:
(click on the winning titles to read the story – use the tool bar at the bottom to scroll through pages)

Lower Primary School (Prep & Year 1)

WINNERS
Illustrations:  Super Cat: Race to the Crown by Hugo Wright
Picture story: The Chocolate Yaks of the Mornington Peninsula by Tyler McClusky
Short story: Sustainaville by Milly Davies

Middle Primary School (Years 2-4)

WINNERS
Poetry: The Magic Box by Luca Broadbent
Picture Story: The Day My Food Fought Back! by Perry McCluskey
Short Story:
1770 by Signe Hardt
Be Careful What You Wish For by Toby Adeney

HONOURABLE MENTIONS
Picture Story:
The Big Holiday by Gwendolin Mapp
Monster Catastrophe by Charlotte Calvert
Short Stories:
The Best Day by Olivia Natoli
The Medallion Thief by Amy Akers

Upper Primary School (Years 5 & 6)

WINNERS
Poetry: Different by Leah Reaper
Tormented Dreams by Faith Hatch
The White Horse by Viola Turchini

HONOURABLE MENTIONS
Trouble in Tango Bay by Sophie Doye
Water by Lilyana
The Odd Friendship by Ilyssa

Lower Secondary School (Years 7-9)

WINNERS
Freedom by Taylor Branford
Hide by Isobel Dymond

HONOURABLE MENTIONS
The Fire That Shook Me by Adam Houben
Welcome to Whiterock by Isabel York

Upper Secondary School (Years 10-12)

No One Knows Riva by Rebecca Shute

Congratulations to ALL ENTRANTS on your wonderful stories – we can’t wait to see what you have for us next year!!

If you’d like to check out the winners and honours list for this year’s Children’s Book Council of Australia Book Awards, you can see them here.  Note that there are usually supply delays for winners and notables following the announcement, but as always we are happy to place special orders if you would like a particular book.

We have limited signed copies of some of Jane Godwin‘s lovely books available in store now (while stocks last).  Her new books Tilly and One Blue Shoe, will be out in October.

AUGUST NEW RELEASES

FICTION

TidelandsTidelands
Philippa Gregory

Midsummer’s Eve, 1648, and England is in the grip of civil war between renegade King and rebellious Parliament. The struggle reaches every corner of the kingdom, even to the remote Tidelands – the marshy landscape of the south coast.

Alinor, a descendant of wise women, crushed by poverty and superstition, waits in the graveyard under the full moon for a ghost who will declare her free from her abusive husband. Instead she meets James, a young man on the run, and shows him the secret ways across the treacherous marsh, not knowing that she is leading disaster into the heart of her life.

Suspected of possessing dark secrets in superstitious times, Alinor’s ambition and determination mark her out from her neighbours. This is the time of witch-mania, and Alinor, a woman without a husband, skilled with herbs, suddenly enriched, arouses envy in her rivals and fear among the villagers, who are ready to take lethal action into their own hands.


InlandInland
Tea Obreht

A man searching for a home he can’t find. A woman bound to a home she can’t leave.

Nora is an unflinching frontierswoman awaiting the return of the men in her life – her husband who has gone in search of water for the parched household, and her elder sons who have vanished after an explosive argument. Nora is biding her time with her youngest son, who is convinced that a mysterious beast is stalking the land around their home, and her husband’s seventeen-year-old cousin, who communes with spirits.

Lurie is a former outlaw and a man haunted by ghosts. He sees lost souls who want something from him, and he finds reprieve from their longing in an unexpected relationship that inspires a momentous expedition across the West.

Mythical, lyrical, and sweeping in scope, Inland is grounded in true but little-known history. It showcases all of Tea Obreht’s talents as a writer, as she subverts and reimagines the myths of the American West, making them entirely – and unforgettably – her own.


Good Girl Bad Girl 
Michael Robotham

The girl with no past…

Six years ago, Evie Cormac was discovered, filthy and half-starved, hiding in a secret room in the aftermath of a shocking crime. Now approaching adulthood, Evie is damaged, self-destructive and has never revealed her true identity.

The boy who survived…

Forensic psychologist Cyrus Haven, a man haunted by his own past, is investigating the death of champion figure-skater Jodie Sheehan. When Cyrus is called upon to assess Evie, she threatens to disrupt the case and destroy his ordered life. Because Evie has a unique and dangerous gift – she knows when someone is lying.

And nobody is telling the truth…


LapseLapse
Sarah Thornton

All it took was a lapse…a momentary lapse…to bring Clementine Jones’ world crashing down. Now she’s living like a hermit in small-town Katinga, coaching the local footy club. She’s supposed to be lying low, but here she is, with her team on the cusp of their first premiership in fifty years—and the whole bloody town counting on her, cheering her on.

So why the hell would her star player quit on the eve of the finals?

It’s a question she wishes she’d left alone. Others are starting to ask questions too—questions about her. Clem’s not the only one with a secret, and as tension builds, the dark violence just below the town’s surface threatens to erupt. Pretty soon there’ll be nowhere left for Clem to hide.


The TrespassersThe Trespassers
Meg Mundell

Fleeing their pandemic-stricken homelands, a shipload of migrant workers departs the UK, dreaming of a fresh start in prosperous Australia.

For nine-year-old Cleary Sullivan, deaf for three years, the journey promises adventure and new friendships; for Glaswegian songstress Billie Galloway, it’s a chance to put a shameful mistake firmly behind her; while impoverished English schoolteacher Tom Garnett hopes to set his future on a brighter path.

But when a crew member is found murdered and passengers start falling gravely ill, the Steadfast is plunged into chaos. Thrown together by chance, and each guarding their own secrets, Cleary, Billie and Tom join forces to survive the journey and its aftermath.

The Trespassers is a beguiling novel that explores the consequences of greed, the experience of exile, and the unlikely ways strangers can become the people we hold dear.


Second SleepThe Second Sleep
Robert Harris

1468. A young priest, Christopher Fairfax, arrives in a remote Exmoor village to conduct the funeral of his predecessor. The land around is strewn with ancient artifacts – coins, fragments of glass, human bones – which the old parson used to collect. Did his obsession with the past lead to his death?

Fairfax becomes determined to discover the truth. Over the course of the next six days, everything he believes – about himself, his faith and the history of his world – will be tested to destruction.


Memory PoliceThe Memory Police
Yoko Ogawa

Hat, ribbon, bird, rose. To the people on the island, a disappeared thing no longer has any meaning. It can be burned in the garden, thrown in the river or handed over to the Memory Police. Soon enough, the island forgets it ever existed.

When a young novelist discovers that her editor is in danger of being taken away by the Memory Police, she desperately wants to save him. For some reason, he doesn’t forget, and it’s becoming increasingly difficult for him to hide his memories. Who knows what will vanish next?

The Memory Police is a beautiful, haunting and provocative fable about the power of memory and the trauma of loss, from one of Japan’s greatest writers.

For readers of The Handmaid’s Tale, Fahrenheit 451 and Nineteen Eighty-Four.


Where the dead goWhere the Dead Go
Sarah Bailey

A fifteen-year-old girl has gone missing after a party in the middle of the night. The following morning her boyfriend is found brutally murdered in his home. Was the girl responsible for the murder, or is she also a victim of the killer? But who would want two teenagers dead?

The aftermath of a personal tragedy finds police detective Gemma Woodstock in the coastal town of Fairhaven with her son Ben in tow. She has begged to be part of a murder investigation so she can bury herself in work rather than taking the time to grieve and figure out how to handle the next stage of her life – she now has serious family responsibilities she can no longer avoid. But Gemma also has ghosts she must lay to rest.

Gemma searches for answers, while navigating her son’s grief and trying to overcome the hostility of her new colleagues. As the mystery deepens and old tensions and secrets come to light, Gemma is increasingly haunted by a similar missing persons case she worked on not long before. A case that ended in tragedy and made her question her instincts as a cop. Can she trust herself again?

A riveting thriller by the author of the international bestseller The Dark Lake, winner of both the Ned Kelly Award and the Sisters in Crime Davitt Award for a debut crime novel.


See you at the ToxtethSee You at the Toxteth
Peter Corris

For almost four decades Peter Corris was known as ‘the godfather of Australian crime fiction’, and Cliff Hardy has been Australia’s favourite private investigator since he solved his first case in 1980. This selection of stories starts with Cliff’s early days driving round Glebe in his battered Falcon, drinking at the Toxteth Hotel and taking on cases that more often than not leave him as battered as his car. As Cliff becomes older and wiser, he prefers to use his head more than his fists, but the cases are as tricky as ever and Hardy’s clients lead him to the murkiest surroundings.

To further celebrate Peter Corris’s legacy, editor Jean Bedford has also included a selection of his columns on the world of crime and crime writing, along with his ‘ABC of Crime Writing’. From Adultery to Yeti, via Gumshoe, Hit man and The Mob, this entertaining compendium gives a fascinating insight into Peter’s vast knowledge of the genre.


Delayed Rays of a StarDelayed Rays of a Star
Amanda Lee Koe

When a photographer captures Marlene Dietrich, Anna May Wong and Leni Riefenstahl in one frame at a party in Berlin in 1928, no one realizes the extent to which their lives will reflect the tumultuous decades that follow.

Marlene crosses the Atlantic to find fame in Hollywood, the town that eats out of the palm of her hand till her wrinkles begin to show. After establishing her position as a filmmaker, Leni watches her fame turn to notoriety following the defeat of Nazi Germany.

Nine and a half times out of ten films, the side characters played by Anna May must die so the white male lead can be returned to his white paramour on the screen. In the murky world these women navigate, their choices will be held up to the test of time. And the real question is, how much has anything changed?

This fierce and exquisite debut about womanhood, ambition, and art, played out against the shifting political tides of the twentieth century, introduces a mesmerizing new literary talent for our times.


Grave for TwoA Grave for Two
Anne Holt

Selma Falck’s personal life and career as a lawyer have hit rock bottom. That is until Hege Chin Morell – Norway’s best female skier – approaches her desperate to overturn a doping charge. With two months to the Winter Olympics, Selma faces the seemingly almost impossible task of clearing Morell’s name.

However, when a male skier is found dead after a training accident, it becomes clear to Selma that there is something more serious at risk. Encountering corruption, hidden enmity and shady connections, the pattern of recent crimes and ancient sins becomes undeniable. As Selma’s race against time begins, she realizes that more lives are at stake …


New GirlThe New Girl
Daniel Silva

At an exclusive private school in Switzerland, mystery surrounds the identity of the beautiful girl who arrives each morning and leaves each afternoon in a heavily protected motorcade fit for a head of state. She is said to be the daughter of a wealthy international businessman. She is not.

And when she is brutally kidnapped across the border in the Haute-Savoie region of France, Gabriel Allon, the legendary chief of Israeli intelligence, is thrust into a deadly secret war with an old enemy that will determine the future of the Middle East-and perhaps the world …


Beggar's KingdomA Beggar’s Kingdom
Paullina Simons

Sometimes a second chance is your only hope.

Is there a fate beyond the fates? Julian has failed Josephine once. Despite grave danger and impossible odds, he is determined to do the unimaginable and try again to save the woman he loves.

What follows is a love story like no other as the doomed lovers embark on an incredible adventure across time and space. Racing through history and against the merciless clock, they face countless dangers and deadly enemies.

Living amid beauty and ecstasy, bloodshed and betrayal, each time they court and cheat death brings Julian and Josephine closer to an unthinkable sacrifice and a confrontation with the harshest master of all…destiny.

The second novel in Paullina Simons’ stunning End of Forever saga continues the heartbreaking story of Julian and Josephine, and a love that spans lifetimes.


Taking Tom Murray HomeTaking Tom Murray Home
Tim Slee

Bankrupt dairy farmer Tom Murray decides he’d rather sell off his herd and burn down his own house than hand them over to the bank. But something goes tragically wrong, and Tom dies in the blaze. His wife, Dawn, doesn’t want him to have died for nothing and decides to hold a funeral procession for Tom as a protest, driving 350 kilometres from Yardley in country Victoria to bury him in Melbourne where he was born. To make a bigger impact she agrees with some neighbours to put his coffin on a horse and cart and take it slow – real slow.

But on the night of their departure, someone burns down the local bank. And as the motley funeral procession passes through Victoria, there are more mysterious arson attacks. Dawn has five days to get to Melbourne. Five days, five more towns, and a state ready to explode in flames …

Told with a laconic, deadpan wit, Taking Tom Murray Home is a timely, thought-provoking, heart-warming, quintessentially Australian story like no other. It’s a novel about grief, pain, anger and loss, yes, but it’s also about hope – and how community, friends and love trump pain and anger, every time.

The winner of the inaugural Banjo Prize, Taking Tom Murray Home is a funny, moving, bittersweet Australian story of fires, families and the restorative power of community.


NON-FICTION

A Lot with a LittleA Lot with a Little
Tim Costello

In this evocative memoir, Tim Costello explores the people and experiences that have shaped him into a socially active fighter for the world’s most challenging issues. Tracing each defining stage of his life with stark insight and honesty, Tim untangles his ongoing struggle to align his self-perceptions with his choices and what his life represents.

More than a simple life story, this is a book about individual and community, public and private, spiritual and material, equality and liberty – and, most of all, about faith and its power to sustain in the face of the world’s big issues. Challenging and thought-provoking no matter what your beliefs, this is a book to savour and re-read.

***Tim will be joining us for an event in Mornington on 15 October – click here for full details and to book a ticket***


Parenthood Completely UnsupervisedParenthood: Completely Unsupervised
Dave O’Neil

Ah, parenting. After 300,000 years of keeping kids alive, you’d reckon we’d have it nailed. But, as the decades roll on, it seems we’re as clueless as ever. In the great tradition of mums and dads throughout history, we’re still making it up as we go along.

Hopscotch may have given way to Xbox and fish fingers to quinoa-kale organic nuggets, but, when it comes to parenting, some things never change.

A laugh-out-loud look at parenthood through the ages by comedian and father of three Dave O’Neil.


Dale Vine's Outdoor Reno GuideDale Vine’s Outdoor Reno Guide
Dale Vine

Nobody wants to spend time in a tired, uninspiring backyard. But how can you create an outdoor space that’s beautiful and works for your needs? Landscaper and much loved The Block contestant, Dale Vine will help you create your dream garden with his Outdoor Reno Guide. From the initial vision to planning, budgeting and final execution, Dale demystifies the process of turning your humble garden into a space that you and your family want to spend time in, whether you’re starting with bare ground or you are renovating an existing space.

With clear examples, notes on common pitfalls and simple, step-by-step DIY projects, Dale provides the specific tips, tricks and advice essential for any landscaping project, from site analysis to lifestyle considerations to plant selection. His most important message: you need a plan. No matter its size or shape, you can transform your outdoor space from a neglected, untamed patch of dirt and weeds into something magical on any budget – and even small changes can turn a simple backyard into a photogenic sanctuary.

Dale Vine’s Outdoor Reno Guide is an inspirational and instructive resource thanks to Dale’s years of experience and expert knowledge. With great photos throughout, see the potential of your garden through the lens of an expert landscaper.


Halliday Wine Companion 2020The Halliday Wine Companion 2020
James Halliday

For over thirty years James Halliday has been Australia’s most respected wine critic, and his Halliday Wine Companion is the go-to guide for wine ratings, regions, best varietals, winery reviews and a curated selection of the best wines in Australia.

The 2020 edition has been completely revised to bring readers up-to-the-minute information, as well as re-designed in a modern new style to reflect the brand’s ever expanding audience. In his inimitable style, Halliday shares his extensive knowledge of wine through detailed tasting notes with points, price, value symbol and advice on best-by drinking, as well as each wine’s closure and alcohol content. He provides information about wineries and winemakers, including vineyard sizes, opening times and contact details. The perfect self-purchase or gift for the wine lover in your life.


Explore AustraliaExplore Australia 2020

Explore Australia 2020 covers more of the country than any other Australian guidebook. Now in its 37th edition, this seminal guidebook includes details on over 700 regional towns across the country, including information on local and nearby attractions, as well as markets and festivals. There’s also key information for every capital city and major touring region, plus suggested daytrip itineraries. Discover the best this country has to offer with features on the best beaches, gourmet food and wine destinations, wildlife encounters, adventure holidays, Indigenous cultural experiences and kid-friendly destinations.

Whatever adventure you’re looking for, Explore Australia 2020 is the ultimate travel guide to help you plan the perfect trip.


Art of Growing UpThe Art of Growing Up
John Marsden

When I hear parents say ‘I want my children to enjoy their childhood; there’ll be time when they’re older to learn about those things’, I hear the voices of those who are scared of the vastness of the universe. These adults have a view of childhood as some kind of discrete interval, rather than just a few years from the continuum of life. How fortunate that the spirit, courage and curiosity of many young people remain largely undefeated by such adults. 

John Marsden has spent his adult life engaging with young minds – through both his award-winning, internationally bestselling young adult fiction and his work as one of Australia’s most esteemed and experienced educators. As the founder and principal of two schools, John is at the coalface of education and daily witness to the inevitable and yet still mysterious process of growing up.

Now, in this astonishing, insightful and hugely ambitious manifesto, John pulls together all he has learned from over thirty years’ experience working with and writing for young people. He shares his insights into everything – from the role of schools and the importance of education, to problem parents and problem children, and the conundrum of what it means to grow up and be ‘happy’ in the 21st century.


Arab Australian OtherArab, Australian, Other: Stories on Race and Identity
Randa Abdel-Fattah and Sara Saleh

Although there are 22 separate Arab nationalities representing an enormous variety of cultural backgrounds and experiences, the portrayal of Arabs in Australia tends to range from homogenising (at best) to racist pop-culture caricatures.

Edited by award-winning author and academic Randa Abdel-Fattah, and activist and poet Sara Saleh, and featuring contributors Michael Mohammed Ahmad, Ruby Hamad and Paula Abood, among many others, this collection explores the experience of living as a member of the Arab diaspora in Australia and includes stories of family, ethnicity, history, grief, isolation, belonging and identity.


Portraits DestroyedPortraits Destroyed: Power, Ego and History’s Vandals
Julie Cotter

Churchill entered Westminster Hall at noon, to the sound of drums beating out a victory roll – his signature gesture. At 80, he was still prime minister, and angered by discussion of retirement. But that irritation would pale in comparison to the anger he was about to feel on this day, 10 November 1954, when his birthday portrait was unveiled.

Portraits have power. For centuries the tool of queens, emperors, statesmen and dictators, they offer the ultimate in image control. And, identified as portraits are with their subjects, their destruction remains a shocking act – whether committed for reasons of vanity, legacy, ethics, race, or even as part of the creative process. Join respected art historian Dr Julie Cotter as she journeys through eras, continents and regimes to examine the extraordinary stories of Portraits Destroyed.


The Father HoodThe Father Hood
Luke Benedictus, Andrew McUtchen, Jeremy Macvean

Welcome to The Father Hood. Where we celebrate the growing tribe of hands-on dads who are discovering that becoming a father is the greatest opportunity a man can get to be better than he’s ever been before; stronger, wiser and more compassionate. But there is no instruction manual or benchmark for modern dads aside from one golden rule: keep showing up.

With a mix of celebrity interviews – from Hugh Jackman, David Beckham, Osher Gunsberg and many more – as well as quotes and stats that capture the rise of the hands-on dad, The Father Hood is the guide to helping modern dads thrive and survive in the only job that really counts.


Australia ModernAustralia Modern: Architecture, Landscape & Design 1925-1975
Hannah Lewi & Philip Goad

From the Sydney Opera House and the National Gallery of Victoria to sought-after homes across the country, the pervasive presence of modernism is inescapable in Australia. Led by the likes of Robin Boyd, Harry Seidler and Walter Burley Griffin, modernist architects and designers set out to rebuild at all scales, from vast infrastructure projects, to public health and education institutions, to new centres of culture, consumption and leisure.

Australia Modern vividly captures this architectural legacy with a survey of 100 significant modern sites, richly illustrated with archival images and newly commissioned photographs. Contextual essays by leading voices in architecture and conservation explore modernism’s influence on every facet of life in Australia and the ongoing challenges facing preservation. Showcasing projects from the iconic and the urban to the everyday, the regional and the lesser known, Australia Modern cultivates an appreciation for the modern architects and buildings that will increasingly constitute the heritage of tomorrow.


Dream About Lightning BugsA Dream About Lightning Bugs
Ben Folds

Ben Folds is an internationally celebrated musician, singer-songwriter and former frontman of the alternative rock band, Ben Folds Five, beloved for songs such as ‘Brick’, ‘You Don’t Know Me’, ‘Rockin’ the Suburbs’ and ‘The Luckiest’.

In A Dream About Lightning Bugs, Folds looks back at his life so far in a charming, funny and wise chronicle of his artistic coming of age, infused with the wry observations of a natural storyteller. He opens up about finding his voice as a musician, becoming a rock anti-hero, and hauling a baby grand piano on and off stage for every performance.

From growing up in working class North Carolina amid the race and class tensions that shaped his early songwriting, to painful life lessons he learned the hard way, he also ruminates on music in the digital age, the absurdity of life on the road, and the challenges of sustaining a multi-decade, multi-faceted career in the music business.

A Dream About Lightning Bugs embodies what Folds has been singing about for years: Smile like you’ve got nothing to prove because it hurts to grow up, and life flies by in seconds.


Strong ManThe Strong Man
Grant Edwards

Grant Edwards was once an elite athlete, Olympics qualifier and Australia’s strongest man. His Guinness Book of Records feats of strength were acclaimed internationally, and as a high ranking police officer he spent decades protecting vulnerable people around the world. But nothing could shield him from catastrophic harm in the line of duty.

Rising above his tough beginnings in 1970s suburbia, Edwards found sanctuary in elite sport. But he found his true calling with the Australian Federal Police, rising swiftly through the ranks to Commander and personally establishing cybercrime units to fight child exploitation and human trafficking. A highly sought after and disciplined security advisor for governments around the world such as East Timor, Afghanistan and the Americas, Edwards was considered the last person to ‘crack’ – but a narrow escape from a deadly attack in Kabul pushed him to breaking point.

This is the story of an extraordinary man and his extraordinary battle back from the brink.


Millionaire CastawayThe Millionaire Castaway
David Glasheen

Losing his fortune in the stock market crash of 1987 was the final straw for Dave Glasheen. After a series of catastrophes, he needed to take drastic measures to restore himself. Opting out of the rat race, he cast himself away to a deserted island off the north-east tip of Australia, as far off the grid as was humanly possible. He has lived there ever since.

One annual supermarket shop, a sketchy internet connection, and enough ingredients for a home brew satisfy all of Dave’s material needs. He catches fish, traps rainwater and cooks on an open fire. For company he tames dingoes, meets with friends from the Aboriginal community 40 kilometres away, and entertains drop-ins such as Russell Crowe sailing past on his honeymoon or the chairman of McDonald’s on a game-fishing trip. Then there’s his running feud with Boxhead, an antisocial saltwater crocodile who just won’t leave him in peace.

Between heartbreak and hair-raising adventures, Dave has found happiness on Restoration Island and dreams of creating a retreat to promote the profound healing that saved his life. Brimming with humour, eccentricity and hard-earned wisdom, The Millionaire Castaway is the feel-good autobiography of the year.


Dear DadDear Dad
Samuel Johnson

If you could tell your dad anything, what would it be? 

Steve Waugh, Kathy Lette, Trent Dalton, John Paul Young, Danny Green, Kurt Fearnley, Samuel Johnson, John Williamson, Susie Youssef, Michala Banas, Glenn Shorrock, Normie Rowe, Matilda Brown, Shane Jacobson, Brooke Davis, Christie Whelan Browne, Shannon Noll, Russell Morris, Shaun Tan, Michelle Law, Ben Gillies, Hilde Hinton, Mark Brandi, Brian Mannix, Russell Morris, Catherine Deveny, Sophie Green, Toni Tapp Coutts …

A heartfelt, honest and very human book of letters that will make you smile, and make you cry. It is the perfect gift for the dad or dad figure in your life. And a poignant reminder to say how you feel before it is too late.


Prettiest Horse in the Glue FactoryThe Prettiest Horse in the Glue Factory
Corey White

Corey White was a golden child. He knew this because his father would hit his mother and his sisters but not him. And his mother adored him so much she let him drop out of primary school.

After losing his father to jail and his mother to heroin, though, he became a target for cruelty and dysfunction in foster homes. A scholarship to a prestigious boarding school lifted him out of foster care and awakened a love of learning and reading for him, but this was soon overwhelmed by a crushing depression and drug addiction.

Through it all, he kept thinking – sometimes hoping, sometimes fearing – that he was destined for something bigger. Would he find salvation in the halls of a university, or a poetically grimy crack den, or through love? Or would the golden glow that had been in him since childhood ultimately fade, leaving only darkness and ruin?

The Prettiest Horse in the Glue Factory is a memoir of trauma and survival that will break your heart and then show you how to rebuild it. It is a powerful, lyrical and darkly funny debut from one of Australia’s brightest young comedians.


SaltSalt
Bruce Pascoe

Bruce Pascoe has been described as a ‘living national treasure’ and his work as ‘revelatory’. This volume of his best and most celebrated stories and essays, collected here for the first time, ranges across his long career, and explores his enduring fascination with Australia’s landscape, culture, land management and history.

Featuring new and previously unpublished fiction alongside his most revered and thought-provoking nonfiction – including extracts from his modern classic Dark Emu – this collection is perfect for Pascoe fans and new readers alike. It’s time all Australians saw the range and depth of this most marvellous of local writers.


Growing up QueerGrowing Up Queer in Australia
Benjamin Law

I marked the day in my adolescent diary with a single blank page.
The mantle of “queer migrant” compelled me to keep going – to go further.
I never “came out” to my parents. I felt I owed them no explanation.
All I heard from the pulpit were grim hints.
I became acutely aware of the parts of myself that were unpalatable to queers who grew up in the city.
I was thirty-eight and figured it was time to come out to her.
That’s when I know it’s not going anywhere – the gay.
I felt like I had been dunked into an episode of The L Word and I wasn’t given the script.
No amount of YouTube videos and queer think pieces prepared me for this moment.
My queerness was born in a hot dry land that was never ceded.
I finally admitted what my feelings for Dirty Dancing–era Patrick Swayze had clearly been indicating for some time.
Even now, I sometimes think that I don’t know my own desire.

Compiled by celebrated author and journalist Benjamin Law, Growing Up Queer in Australia assembles voices from across the spectrum of LGBTIQA+ identity. Spanning diverse places, eras, genders, ethnicities and experiences, these are the stories of growing up queer in Australia.

For better or worse, sooner or later, life conspires to reveal you to yourself, and this is growing up.

With contributions from David Marr, Fiona Wright, Nayuka Gorrie, Steve Dow, Holly Throsby, Sally Rugg, Tony Ayres, Nic Holas, Rebecca Shaw, Kerryn Phelps and many more.


Veg Jamie OliverVeg
Jamie Oliver

A real explosion of colour, taste and variety, he wants to get the nation switched on to just how tasty and comforting veggie meals can be, leaving people feeling full, satisfied and happy – and not missing meat from their plate. Whether it’s embracing a meat-free day or two each week, living a vegetarian lifestyle, or just wanting to try some brilliant new flavour combinations, this book ticks all the boxes.

Sharing simple tips and tricks that will excite the taste buds, and help keep people’s brains and mouths engaged, this book will also give people the confidence to up their veg intake and widen their recipe repertoire, safe in the knowledge that it’ll taste utterly delicious. From simple suppers and family favourites to weekend dishes for sharing with friends, this book is packed full of phenomenal food – pure and simple.

A book for everyone, this is the perfect moment for Jamie to inspire every kind of cook with his super-tasty, brilliantly simple, but inventive veg dishes.


Jack CharlesJack Charles: A Born-again Blakfella
Jack Charles

Stolen from his mother and placed into institutional care when he was only a few months old, Uncle Jack was raised under the government’s White Australia Policy. The loneliness and isolation he experienced during those years had a devastating impact on him that endured long after he reconnected with his Aboriginal roots and discovered his stolen identity. Even today he feels like an outsider; a loner; a fringe dweller.

In this honest and no-holds-barred memoir, Uncle Jack reveals the ‘ups and downs of this crazy, drugged up, locked up, fucked up, and at times unbelievable, life’. From his sideline as a cat burglar, battles with drug addiction and stints in prison, to gracing the nation’s stages and screens as he dazzled audiences with his big personality and acting prowess, he takes us through the most formative moments of his life.

By turns heartbreaking and hilarious, Jack Charles: A Born-again Blakfella is a candid and uplifting memoir from one of Australia’s finest and most beloved actors.


Women Men Whole Damn ThingWomen, Men and the Whole Damn Thing
David Leser

How to find the right words to frame this horror? How to understand why men do what they do to women? How to comprehend this malign force that seems to seep from the male psyche and infect us all? . . . That is the central hope, the appeal, embedded in this book: that other men might join me in this investigation and ruthless self-interrogation-and in doing so, become part of the change that is so urgently required.

In February 2018, the Good Weekend cover story by David Leser, ‘Women, Men and the Whole Damn Thing’, had an extraordinary response. David received hundreds of personal messages from readers around the world – both men and women – urging him to expand his story. Here is that book: a brilliant, impassioned, unflinching account of the firestorm of #MeToo, how we got there and where we must go now.

In this essential and incisive investigation, Leser unearths the roots of misogyny, its inextricable links to the patriarchy and how history brought us to the #Metoo movement and the wave of incandescent female rage that is sweeping the world. Crucially, he also interrogates his own psyche, privilege and culpability as he bears witness to the ‘collective wound of the world’ and asks how we can move towards healing and profound and permanent change.


SongspiralsSongspirals: Sharing Women’s Wisdom of Country Through Songlines
Gay’wu Group of Women

‘We want you to come with us on our journey, our journey of songspirals. Songspirals are the essence of people in this land, the essence of every clan. We belong to the land and it belongs to us. We sing to the land, sing about the land. We are that land. It sings to us.’ 

Aboriginal Australian cultures are the oldest living cultures on earth and at the heart of Aboriginal cultures is song. These ancient narratives of landscape have often been described as a means of navigating across vast distances without a map, but they are much, much more than this. Songspirals are sung by Aboriginal people to awaken Country, to make and remake the life-giving connections between people and place. Songspirals are radically different ways of understanding the relationship people can have with the landscape.

For Yolngu people from North East Arnhem Land, women and men play different roles in bringing songlines to life, yet the vast majority of what has been published is about men’s place in songlines. Songspirals is a rare opportunity for outsiders to experience Aboriginal women’s role in crying the songlines in a very authentic and direct form.


Chip Shop in PoznanA Chip Shop in Poznan: My Unlikely Year in Poland
Ben Aitken

Not many Brits move to Poland to work in a fish and chip shop. Fewer still come back wanting to be a Member of the European Parliament.

Travel writer Ben Aitken moved to Poland in 2016 to understand why the Poles were leaving. He booked the cheapest flight he could find, to a place he had never heard of – Poznan. This candid, funny and off-beat book is the account of his year in Poland, as an unlikely immigrant.

Between peeling potatoes and boning fish, Ben spent time on the road travelling the country. He missed the bus to Auschwitz; stayed with a dozen nuns near Krakow; was offered a job by a Eurosceptic farmer and went to Gdansk to learn how Solidarity rose and communism fell.

This is a bittersweet portrait of an unsung country, challenging stereotypes that Poland is a grey, ex-soviet land, and revealing a diverse country, rightfully proud of its colourful identity.


Woman Like HerA Woman Like Her: The Short Life of Qandeel Baloch
Sanam Maher

A beautiful woman in winged eyeliner and a low-cut top lies on a bed urging her favourite cricketer to win the next match. In another post, she pouts at the camera from a hot tub. She posts a selfie with a cleric, wearing his cap at a jaunty angle. Her posts are viewed millions of times and the comments beneath them are full of hate. As her notoriety grows, the comments made about her on national talk shows are just as vitriolic. They call her Pakistan’s Kim Kardashian, they say she’ll do anything for attention. When she’s murdered, they’re transfixed by the footage of her body.

Drawing on interviews and in-depth research, Sanam Maher pieces together Qandeel’s life from the village where she grew up in the backwaters of rural Pakistan, to her stint in a women’s shelter after escaping her marriage, to her incarnation as a social media sensation and the Muslim world’s most unlikely feminist icon.


Banking BadBanking Bad
Adele Ferguson

In 2018, against all the odds, Australia held a royal commission into the banking and financial services industries. Its revelations rocked the nation. Even defenders of the banks were blindsided.

Few people were more instrumental in bringing about the commission than journalist Adele Ferguson. Through her exposes in print and on television, she pursued the truth about funds mismanagement, fraud, lack of probity, and the hard-sell culture that took over the finance industry after deregulation in the 1980s. But it wasn’t just light-touch regulators and crooked bankers growing fat on bonuses she put under the spotlight. It was also their victims – men and women who had lost everything, and had no recourse when they discovered empty accounts, egregious fees, forged documents and broken promises.

Now in Banking Bad, Ferguson tells the full story of the power imbalance, toxic culture and cover-ups. She describes the long fight for justice by whistleblowers, victims and political mavericks, and she looks at the outcomes of the royal commission – the falls from grace, the damaging hubris, the scathing assessment of the regulators, and the colossal compensation bill – an estimated $10 billion.

Finally, she asks whereto from here? In May 2019, the Coalition government, which resisted calls for a royal commission, was re-elected. Bank stocks surged and lending regulations were loosened. Will it all be business as usual from now on, or have our financial executives learned that their wealth cannot come at the expense of ordinary Australians?

JULY NEW RELEASES

FICTION

One Good DeedOne Good Deed
David Baldacci

In 1949, Aloysius Archer arrives in the dusty Southern town of Poca City. He has nothing but a handful of dollars, the clothes he’s wearing and an appointment with his new parole officer. After his wartime experiences in Italy and a prison sentence for a crime he didn’t commit, Archer is looking for a fresh start and a peaceful life.

On his first night of freedom, Archer meets local business tycoon Hank Pittleman, who promises Archer handsome compensation to work as his debt collector. Yet Archer takes on more than he bargains for, as he becomes embroiled in a long-running feud between the drought-struck town’s most dangerous residents. When one of them dies, the authorities label Archer as their number one suspect.

A bloody game is being played above and below the law. Everybody playing has a deeply buried secret, and Archer must uncover them all – if he’s to avoid going back behind bars.


Most Fun We Ever HadThe Most Fun We Ever Had
Claire Lombardo

At a family wedding, the four Sorenson sisters polka-dot the green lawn in their summer pastels, with varying shades of hair and varying degrees of unease. Their long-infatuated parents watch on with a combination of love and concern.

Sixteen years later, the already messy lives of the sisters are thrown into turmoil by the unexpected reappearance of a teenage boy given up for adoption years earlier – and the rich and varied tapestry of the Sorensons’ past is revealed.

Weaving between past and present, The Most Fun We Ever Had portrays the delights and difficulties of family life and the endlessly complex mixture of affection and abhorrence we feel for those closest to us. A dazzlingly accomplished debut and an utterly immersive portrait of one family’s becoming, it marks the arrival of a major new literary voice.


Nearly Normal FamilyA Nearly Normal Family
M.T. Edvardsson

Every murder case starts with a suspect.
What if the suspect is your daughter?
Would you believe her, or the evidence against her?

The Father
Believes his daughter has been framed.

The Mother
Believes she is hiding something.

The Daughter
Believes they have no idea what she’s truly capable of . . .

There are three sides to the story.
And the truth will shatter this family to pieces.

A Nearly Normal Family is the stunning psychological thriller from M. T. Edvardsson and asks what would you do if your child was suspected of murder, how far would you go to protect them? Do you want to know the truth? If you loved A. J. Finn’s The Woman in the Window or J. P. Delaney’s The Girl Before, you will love this.


Nickel BoysThe Nickel Boys
Colson Whitehead

Elwood Curtis has taken the words of Dr Martin Luther King to heart: he is as good as anyone. Abandoned by his parents, brought up by his loving, strict and clear-sighted grandmother, Elwood is about to enroll in the local black college. But given the time and the place, one innocent mistake is enough to destroy his future, and so Elwood arrives at The Nickel Academy, which claims to provide ‘physical, intellectual and moral training’ which will equip its inmates to become ‘honorable and honest men’.

In reality, the Nickel Academy is a chamber of horrors, where physical, emotional and sexual abuse is rife, where corrupt officials and tradesmen do a brisk trade in supplies intended for the school, and where any boy who resists is likely to disappear ‘out back’. Stunned to find himself in this vicious environment, Elwood tries to hold on to Dr King’s ringing assertion, ‘Throw us in jail, and we will still love you.’ But Elwood’s fellow inmate and new friend Turner thinks Elwood is naive and worse; the world is crooked, and the only way to survive is to emulate the cruelty and cynicism of their oppressors.

The tension between Elwood’s idealism and Turner’s skepticism leads to a decision which will have decades-long repercussions. Based on the history of a real reform school in Florida that operated for one hundred and eleven years and warped and destroyed the lives of thousands of children, The Nickel Boys is a devastating, driven narrative by a great American novelist whose work is essential to understanding the current reality of the United States.


The ChainThe Chain
Adrian McKinty

Listen carefully …
Your child has been kidnapped.
You must abduct someone else’s child to save your own.
Disobey. Break the rules. Go to the cops. Your child will die.
Your victim’s parents must kidnap another child before yours is released.
You are now part of the chain.

#Dontbreakthechain

A book for readers who loved The Girl on the Train and Gone Girl.


Ten Loves of Mr NishinoThe Ten Loves of Mr Nishino
Hiromi Kawakami

Who loves Mr Nishino?

Minami is the daughter of Mr Nishino’s true love.
Bereaved Shiori is tempted by his unscrupulous advances.
His colleague Manami should know better.
His conquest Reiko treasures her independence above all else.
Friends Tama and Subaru find themselves playing Nishino’s game, but Eriko loves her cat more.
Sayuri is older, Aichan is much younger, and Misono has her own conquests to make.

For each of them, an encounter with elusive womaniser Mr Nishino will bring torments, desires and delights.


Whisper NetworkWhisper Network
Chandler Baker

Sloane, Ardie, Grace, and Rosalita have worked at Truviv, Inc. for years. The sudden death of Truviv’s CEO means their boss, Ames, will likely take over the entire company. Each of the women has a different relationship with Ames, who has always been surrounded by whispers about how he treats women. Those whispers have been ignored, swept under the rug, hidden away by those in charge.

But the world has changed, and the women are watching this promotion differently. This time, when they find out Ames is making an inappropriate move on a colleague, they aren’t willing to let it go. This time, they’ve decided enough is enough.

Sloane and her colleagues’ decision to take a stand sets in motion a catastrophic shift in the office. Lies will be uncovered. Secrets will be exposed. And not everyone will survive.

Explosive, timely, resonant and relatable: if you love Liane Moriarty’s Big Little Lies or Celeste Ng’s Little Fires Everywhere, you will love Whisper Network.


Other Half of Augusta HopeThe Other Half of Augusta Hope
Joanna Glen

Augusta Hope has never felt like she fits in.

At six, she’s memorising the dictionary. At seven, she’s correcting her teachers. At eight, she spins the globe and picks her favourite country on the sound of its name: Burundi.

And now that she’s an adult, Augusta has no interest in the goings-on of the small town where she lives with her parents and her beloved twin sister, Julia.

When an unspeakable tragedy upends everything in Augusta’s life, she’s propelled headfirst into the unknown. She’s determined to find where she belongs – but what if her true home, and heart, are half a world away?


Six MinutesSix Minutes
Petronella McGovern

How can a child disappear from under the care of four playgroup mums?

One Thursday morning, Lexie Parker dashes to the shop for biscuits, leaving Bella in the safe care of the other mums in the playgroup.

Six minutes later, Bella is gone.

Police and media descend on the tiny village of Merrigang on the edge of Canberra. Locals unite to search the dense bushland. But as the investigation continues, relationships start to fracture, online hate messages target Lexie, and the community is engulfed by fear.

Is Bella’s disappearance connected to the angry protests at Parliament House? What secrets are the parents hiding? And why does a local teacher keep a photo of Bella in his lounge room?

What happened in those six minutes and where is Bella?  The clock is ticking…

This gripping novel will keep you guessing to the very last twist.


The Yield
Tara June Winch

The yield in English is the reaping, the things that man can take from the land. In the language of the Wiradjuri yield is the things you give to, the movement, the space between things- baayanha.

Knowing that he will soon die, Albert ‘Poppy’ Gondiwindi takes pen to paper. His life has been spent on the banks of the Murrumby River at Prosperous House, on Massacre Plains. Albert is determined to pass on the language of his people and everything that was ever remembered. He finds the words on the wind.

August Gondiwindi has been living on the other side of the world for ten years when she learns of her grandfather’s death. She returns home for his burial, wracked with grief and burdened with all she tried to leave behind. Her homecoming is bittersweet as she confronts the love of her kin and news that Prosperous is to be repossessed by a mining company. Determined to make amends she endeavours to save their land – a quest that leads her to the voice of her grandfather and into the past, the stories of her people, the secrets of the river.

Profoundly moving and exquisitely written, Tara June Winch’s The Yield is the story of a people and a culture dispossessed. But it is as much a celebration of what was and what endures, and a powerful reclaiming of Indigenous language, storytelling and identity.


Last Widow (Will Trent 9)The Last Widow (Will Trent #9)
Karin Slaughter

A mysterious kidnapping

On a hot summer night, a scientist from the Centers for Disease Control is grabbed by unknown assailants in a shopping center parking lot. Vanished into thin air, the authorities are desperate to save the doctor.

A devastating explosion

One month later, the serenity of a sunny Sunday afternoon is shattered by the boom of a ground-shaking blast-followed by another seconds later. One of Atlanta’s busiest and most important neighborhoods has been bombed-the location of Emory University, two major hospitals, the FBI headquarters, and the CDC.

A diabolical enemy

Medical examiner Sara Linton and her partner Will Trent, an investigator with the Georgia Bureau of Investigation, rush to the scene-and into the heart of a deadly conspiracy that threatens to destroy thousands of innocent lives.


Constant HumA Constant Hum
Alice Bishop

Before the bushfires—before the front of flames comes roaring over the hills—the ridges are thick with gums.

After the fires, the birds have gone. There is only grey ash and melted metal, the blackened husks of cars.
And the lost people: in temporary accommodation on the outskirts of the city, on the TV news in borrowed clothes, or remembered in flyers on a cafe wall.

A Constant Hum grapples with the aftermath of disaster with an eye for telling detail. Some of these stories cut to the bone; others are empathetic stories of survival, even hope.  All are gripping and beautifully written, heralding the arrival of an important new voice in literary fiction.


ShepherdShepherd
Catherine Jinks

My father trained me to silence the way he trained his dogs, with food and a cane. Speech, he said, was poison. It scared the game, alerted the gamekeepers and betrayed your friends and family.

Tom Clay was a poacher back in Suffolk. He was twelve when he was caught, tried and transported to New South Wales.

Now, assigned to a shepherds’ hut out west, he is a boy among violent men. He keeps his counsel and watches over his sheep; he steers clear of blowhards like the new man, Rowdy Cavanagh. He is alert to danger, knowing he is a foreigner here: that the land resists his understanding.

The question is: how fast can he learn?

Because a vicious killer named Dan Carver is coming for Tom and Rowdy. And if Tom can’t outwit Carver in the bush – and convince Rowdy to keep his stupid mouth shut – their deaths will be swift and cruel.

This riveting, fast-paced new novel from the multi-award-winning Catherine Jinks brings the brutality and courage of Australia’s colonial frontier vividly to life – and sees one of our master storytellers at the peak of her powers.


MinotaurMinotaur
Peter Goldsworthy

Peter Goldsworthy’s new novel features a blind detective determined to deliver justice to the man who shot him, even though his failed assassin has broken out of jail and is equally determined to finish the job. Cleverly structured around the five senses, and with the action confined to one week, it’s pacey and taut, with the cat-and-mouse tension leavened by lighter interludes.

Goldsworthy is interested in all that his protagonist cannot see, as he is forced to meet evil, acting on a trust in his senses, and the ineluctable mystery that is memory.


Live a LittleLive a Little
Howard Jacobson

At the age of ninety-something, Beryl Dusinbery is forgetting everything – including her own children. She spends her days stitching morbid samplers and tormenting her two long-suffering carers, Nastya and Euphoria, with tangled stories of her husbands and love affairs.

Shimi Carmelli can do up his own buttons, walks without the aid of a frame and speaks without spitting. Among the widows of North London, he’s whispered about as the last of the eligible bachelors. Unlike Beryl, he forgets nothing – especially not the shame of a childhood incident that has hung over him like an oppressive cloud ever since.

There’s very little life remaining for either of them, but perhaps just enough to heal some of the hurt inflicted along the way, and find new meaning in what’s left. Told with Jacobson’s trademark wit and style, Live a Little is in equal parts funny, irreverent and tender – a novel to make you consider all the paths not taken, and whether you could still change course.


Knife (Harry Hold 12)Knife (Harry Hole #12)
Jo Nesbo

Following the dramatic conclusion of number one bestseller The ThirstKnife sees Harry Hole waking up with a ferocious hangover, his hands and clothes covered in blood.  Not only is Harry about to come face to face with an old, deadly foe, but with his darkest personal challenge yet.

The phenomenal twelfth instalment in Jo Nesbo’s internationally bestselling crime fiction series.


NON-FICTION

Sunday Story ClubThe Sunday Story Club
Doris Brett & Kerry Cue

These are the stories that women tell each other when they gather for a deep and structured conversation – once a month in a suburban living room – about the things that really matter. They discover that life can be a heartbeat away from chaos; that bad things happen to good people; that good people do outrageous things; that the desire for transformation is enduringly human.

A mother tells of the heartbreaking loss of control when her daughter develops anorexia.  A sister reveals the high psychological cost of being hated by a sibling over the course of her life.  Husbands leave wives; wives take lovers; friendships shatter; finances collapse; children defy parents; wrong choices turn out to be right ones; agency is lost and re-claimed.

Profound, layered and clear-sighted, this collection of real-life stories reveals the emotional untidiness that lies below the shiny surface of modern life and reminds us of the power of real conversation to enlighten, heal and transform.


Waste Not Everyday
Erin Rhoads

Suited to those who are interested in taking their first steps towards a zero waste lifestyle, this book is a lighter, easier approach to Erin’s first and more in depth book, Waste Not. Also makes a great gift for friends and family looking for a simple introduction to the concept of zero waste.

Would you like to throw away less? Do something for the planet? But not ready to dive straight into composting or go totally plastic-free yet? Waste Not Everyday is your step-by-step guide with 365 easy changes that will not only influence what you throw out but also have a genuine impact on the future of our planet.

Split into four easy-to-follow parts, Waste Not Everyday features simple tips that will lead to a real shift in thinking and action and show you that a zero-waste lifestyle is actually achievable – for everyone, every budget and every schedule. With tips ranging from actions and inspiration to recipes and resources, Erin Rhoads, well-known zero-waste advocate and author of Waste Not, takes you on a gentle journey towards a life with less waste and more meaning.

***Mark your calendar! Erin will be joining us in store on Thursday 7 November for a ‘waste-free Christmas’ workshop***


Only in TokyoOnly in Toyko
Michael Ryan & Luke Burgess

Join intrepid chefs Michael Ryan and Luke Burgess on the best sort of culinary adventure – one that could happen only in Tokyo. From daybreak to late night, discover the creative people and compelling stories behind the restaurants, bars and tea houses of the world’s most exciting food destination. This is a book as much for people travelling to the city as it is for those with an appreciation of its special magic.


CastawayCastaway
Robert Macklin

In 1858, 14-year-old Narcisse Pelletier sailed from Marseilles in the French trader Saint-Paul. With a cargo of Bordeaux wine, they stopped in Bombay, then Hong Kong, and from there they set sail with more than 300 Chinese prospectors bound for the goldfields of Ballarat and Bendigo. Around the eastern tip of New Guinea, however, the ship became engulfed in fog, struck reefs and ran aground.

Scrambling aboard a longboat, the survivors undertook a perilous voyage, crossing almost 1000 kilometres of the Coral Sea before reaching the shores of the Daintree region in far north Queensland, where, abandoned by his shipmates and left for dead, Narcisse was rescued by the local Aboriginal people. For seventeen years he lived with them, growing to manhood and participating fully in their world – until in 1875 he was discovered by the crew of a pearling lugger and wrenched from his Aboriginal family. Taken back to his ‘real’ life in France, he became a lighthouse keeper, married and had another family, all the while dreaming of what he had left behind…

Drawing from firsthand interviews with Narcisse after his return to France and other contemporary accounts of exploration and survival, and documenting the spread of European settlement in Queensland and the brutal frontier wars that followed, Robert Macklin weaves an unforgettable tale of a young man caught between two cultures in a time of transformation and upheaval.


On Eating MeatOn Eating Meat
Matthew Evans

How can 160,000 deaths in one day constitute a ‘medium-sized operation’?
Think beef is killing the world? What about asparagus farms? Or golf?
Eat dairy? You’d better eat veal, too.

Going vegan might be all the rage, but the fact is the world has an ever-growing, insatiable appetite for meat – especially cheap meat. Former food critic and chef, now farmer and restaurateur Matthew Evans grapples with the thorny issues around the ways we produce and consume animals.

From feedlots and abattoirs, to organic farms and animal welfare agencies, he has an intimate, expert understanding of the farming practices that take place in our name. Evans calls for less radicalisation, greater understanding, and for ethical omnivores to stand up for the welfare of animals and farmers alike.

Sure to spark intense debate, On Eating Meat is an urgent read for all vegans, vegetarians and carnivores.


Three WomenThree Women
Lisa Taddeo

All Lina wanted was to be desired. How did she end up in a marriage with two children and a husband who wouldn’t touch her?

All Maggie wanted was to be understood. How did she end up in a relationship with her teacher and then in court, a hated pariah in her small town?

All Sloane wanted was to be admired. How did she end up a sexual object of men, including her husband, who liked to watch her have sex with other men and women?

Three Women is a record of unmet needs, unspoken thoughts, disappointments, hopes and unrelenting obsessions.


Mirka MoraMirka Mora: A Life Making Art
Sabine Cotte

‘I would paint the sky if I was offered it.’ – Mirka Mora

Mirka Mora: A Life Making Art provides a unique insight into one of Melbourne’s most beloved personalities. Revealing an unseen side of Mirka through both her materials and practice, this intimate portrait shares her complex and truly innovative techniques, which until now have not been studied.

Detailing the artist’s breadth of practice, her idiosyncratic processes and blend of traditional methods and modern creativity, this book shows how Mirka’s various modes of making art connected deep emotions, stories of displacement and loss with major movements of the twentieth century. From Holocaust survivor to Melbourne cultural icon, Mirka expressed the intensity of her personal life through artworks that embodied feminism, the craft movement as well as community art policies of the 1980s.

With privileged access to the artist and her studio, Sabine Cotte offers a new perspective on this extraordinary woman, illuminating Mirka’s significance as one of Australia’s most compelling, creative and prolific artists.


My First MemoryMy First Memory: Epiphanies, Watersheds and Origin Stories
Ben Holden

What is your first memory?

Or, rather, what do you imagine to be your earliest memory?

Perhaps, alternatively, there was a moment during childhood when the world’s axis shifted? A transformative realisation, epiphany or experience that changed the course of your life: your very own ‘sense of a beginning’…

In My First Memory, bestselling anthologist Ben Holden explores these touchstones via the watershed experiences of some of the greatest figures of our age. Along the way, he lightly explores how memory and childhood merge to form identity. How, in the process, we not only create individual origin-stories but also, on a broader level, fashion human history.

The first memories of iconic figures – from Machiavelli to Freud, Einstein to Hawking, Churchill to Luther King, Pankhurst to Angelou, Pavarotti to Springsteen, and Pelé to Bolt – combine with exclusive, personal pieces by some of today’s greatest writers, scientists and thinkers: the likes of Sebastian Barry, Melvyn Bragg, David Eagleman, Susan Greenfield, Tessa Hadley, Javier Marías, Michael Morpurgo and the late Ursula K Le Guin.

The trip down memory lane is heightened by the remembrances of refugees: from heroic figures such as Madeleine Albright, Isabel Allende, Alf Dubs, Yusra Mardini, Elie Wiesel and Stefan Zweig to lesser-known but no less courageous voices. Many of these moving accounts tell of children being forced to leave home and family behind forever. They may have grown up to lead inspirational lives – but none ever forgot from whence they came.

After all, each of us must start somewhere and – as this timeless collection unforgettably proves – there is always a first time for everything.


No worriesNo Worries: A Guide to Releasing Anxiety and Worry Using CBT
Sarah Edelman

From the bestselling author of Change Your Thinking comes No Worries – the clear, compassionate and practical guide to understanding and managing anxiety and worry.  Sarah Edelman is a clinical psychologist, author and trainer. She has published many articles in professional and mainstream journals, and is the author of the best-selling book on CBT, Change Your Thinking.


BowravilleBowraville
Dan Box

A true crime story cannot often be believed, at least at the beginning. In Bowraville, all three of the victims were Aboriginal. All three were killed within five months, between 1990 and 1991. The same white man was linked to each, but nobody was convicted.

More than two decades later, homicide detective Gary Jubelin contacted Dan Box, asking him to pursue this serial killing. At that time, few others in the justice system seemed to know – or care – about the murders in Bowraville. Dan spoke to the families of the victims, Colleen Walker-Craig, Evelyn Greenup and Clinton Speedy-Duroux, as well as the lawyers, police officers and even the suspect involved in what had happened. His investigation, as well as the families’ own determined campaigning, forced the authorities to reconsider the killings.

This account asks painful questions about what ‘justice’ means and how it is delivered, as well as describing Dan’s own shifting, uncomfortable realisation that he was a reporter who crossed the line.


History of PhilosophyThe History of Philosophy
A.C. Grayling

The story of philosophy is an epic tale: an exploration of the ideas, views and teachings of some of the most creative minds known to humanity. But since the long-popular classic, Bertrand Russell’s History of Western Philosophy, first published in 1945, there has been no comprehensive and entertaining, single-volume history of this great intellectual journey.

With his characteristic clarity and elegance A. C. Grayling takes the reader from the world-views and moralities before the age of the Buddha, Confucius, and Socrates, through Christianity’s dominance of the European mind, to the Renaissance and Enlightenment, and on to Mill, Nietzsche, Sartre, and philosophy today. And, since the story of philosophy is incomplete without mention of the great philosophical traditions of India, China and the Persian-Arabic world, he gives a comparative survey of them too.

Accessible for students and eye-opening for philosophy readers, he covers epistemology, metaphysics, ethics, aesthetics, logic, the philosophy of mind, the philosophy of language, political philosophy and the history of debates in these areas of enquiry, through the ideas of the celebrated philosophers as well as less well-known influential thinkers. He also asks what we have learnt from this body of thought, and what progress is still to be made.

The first authoritative and accessible one-volume history of philosophy for decades, remarkable for its range and accessibility, this is a landmark work.


A Stolen LifeA Stolen Life
Antonio Buti

On Christmas Day 1957, Joe Trevorrow walked through the blistering heat to seek help for his sick baby boy. When relatives agreed to take Bruce to hospital, Joe was relieved – his son was in safe hands – but, within days, Bruce would be living with another family, and Joe would never see his son again.

At the age of ten, Bruce would be returned to his Indigenous family, sparking a lifelong search for an identity that could never truly be known and a court case that made history.


Plots and PrayersPlots and Prayers
Niki Savva

On 21 August 2018, 35 Liberal MPs cast their vote against Malcolm Turnbull, effectively signalling the end of his leadership. Three days later, the deed was done, and Scott Morrison was anointed prime minister.

Abbott’s relentless campaign of destabilisation, helped along by his acolytes in the Parliament and by his powerful media mates, the betrayals of colleagues, and the rise of the religious right, climaxing in the challenge by Peter Dutton, all played a part in Turnbull’s downfall.

But so did Turnbull’s own poor political judgement. He was a good prime minister and a terrible politician. The good bits of Malcolm were not enough to make up for the bad Malcolm.

Nevertheless, the sheer brutality of his removal left many Liberals aghast. MPs were traumatised or humiliated by eight days of madness. Men and women cried from sheer anguish. They went through hell, and feared when it was over that they would not make it back – and nor would the Liberal Party.  Turnbull’s road ended in ruins, as it was always bound to and as he always knew it would, as he predicted to Niki Savva less than three years before it happened.

But when his end was imminent, he could not bear to let go. And when it was over, he was defiant, fragile – and, yes – vengeful.

This is the inside story of what happened – and what happened next.


Wunch of BankersA Wunch of Bankers: A Year in the Hayne Royal Commission
Daniel Ziffer

For Dan Ziffer and his Australia-wide audience, it was a complicated, galling, and gasp-inducing year at the Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry.  It wasn’t just its exhaustive rounds of hearings around the country – Melbourne, Brisbane, Darwin, and Sydney – on topics from farming finance to financial planning. It wasn’t even the long list of scandals exposed to a horrified nation – charging fees to dead people, blatant conflicts of interest, and taking $1 billion from customers in fees that banks were never entitled to.

Mixed among the testimony are snippets from life on the road as the World’s Oldest Debuting TV Reporter – not just driving five hours one-way to talk to a man who almost blew his brains out over a bank nabbing his $22 million estate, but explaining how journalism can only ever give you a glimpse inside complex issues.

In A Wunch of Bankers, Dan Ziffer bring out the colour and grit of the royal commission’s proceedings, and explores broader issues raised by the testimony. A mixture of analysis, reportage, and observations, it is densely researched and compellingly written.


Fake
Stephanie Wood

Women the world over are brought up to hope, even expect, to find the man of their dreams, marry and live happily ever after. When Stephanie Wood meets a sweet, sophisticated man who owns land and businesses, she embarks on an exhilarating romance with him. He seems compassionate, truthful and loving. He talks about the future with her. She falls in love. She also becomes increasingly beset by anxiety at the lavish three-act plays he offers her in the form of excuses for frequent cancellations and no-shows. She begins to wonder, who is this man?

When she ends the relationship Stephanie switches back on her journalistic nous and uncovers a story of mind-boggling duplicity and manipulation. She also finds she is not alone; that the world is full of smart, sassy women who have suffered the attentions of liars, cheats, narcissists, fantasists and phonies, men with dangerously adept abilities to deceive.

In this brilliantly acute and broad-ranging book, Wood, an award-winning writer and journalist, has written a riveting, important account of contemporary love, and the resilience of those who have witnessed its darkest sides.


Perfect MotionPerfect Motion: How Walking Makes Us Wiser
Jono Lineen

Since our first ancestor rose up to place one foot in front of another, our desire to walk has produced fundamental changes in our bodies and minds.  In Perfect Motion, Jono Lineen investigates that transformation, and why walking has made us more creative, helped us to learn, constructed our perception of time, strengthened our resilience and provided a way of making sense of our life – and death.

After the tragic loss of his younger brother, Lineen experienced walking’s regenerative power firsthand. Grief-stricken and adrift, he set off on a 2700-kilometre solo trek across the Himalayas. He walked for months until his legs ached and feet blistered, and by the end of the expedition something had changed in him. He was stronger – not just physically, but psychologically and emotionally.

What had happened? What had given him this feeling of peace; joy even? Determined to find out, he began researching the science and history of walking and running, and discovered that there were fascinating reasons for his metamorphosis. Now, weaving together his own remarkable personal stories with evolutionary research, psychology, neuroscience, anatomy and philosophy, Lineen reveals for the first time the powerful effect that even the shortest strolls can have on us. And why walking is what we’re made to do; it is our perfect motion.

LOVE YOUR BOOKSHOP DAY 2019!

Love Your Bookshop Day is about celebrating bookshops,
bookselling and the culture of books, reading and writing.

So whether you love us for our amazing staff and their awesome advice and friendly service,
our carefully curated range of gorgeous books,
our great events,
or just simply that wonderful sight and smell
when you step through the door,
we’d love to see you on
Saturday 10 August 

to help us celebrate!!


Here’s some of the great stuff we’ve got planned for the day:

  • We know so many of you love our wonderful front window displays, now here’s a chance to ‘win the window’! – thanks to the support of our wonderful publishers, we’ll have a window full of amazing books that you could win, simply by making a purchase of $50 or more in store on Saturday 10 August!  Ask staff for details on how to enter.

  • Children’s Illustrator Extraordinaire, James Hart, will be visiting between 11am and 1pm, drawing pictures on request!  Come on down for your very own personalised piece of art!!

  • We’ll be donating 10% of sales for the day to the Indigenous Literacy Foundation to support the fantastic work they do.  You can find out more about the ILF here.

  • Get creative and sign our graffiti wall – add in your favourite book titles, have a go at illustrating your favourite book character or just tell us what you love most about Farrells!

  • Sausage Sizzle from 11am-1pm, thanks to the Rotary Club of Mornington – proceeds also to the ILF.

  • Face Painting for the kids!  From 11am-1pm we’ll have free face painting for all our youngest bookshop lovers.

  • Colouring in Competition! For kids up to age 12, collect a copy of the picture in store or print a copy off here.  Entries should be returned by 5pm Wednesday 14 August, with the winners announced and prizes awarded at our Children’s Book Week celebration on Saturday 17 August at 3pm.

  • Micro-story Challenge – jump on our social media pages (Facebook and Instagram) to enter our micro-story competition – can you tell a story in only 10 words – no more, no less!?  Great prizes to be won.

  • Lucky book dip!  Make a purchase and then take your chances with our lucky dip – you could score an advanced reading copy of a forthcoming book or perhaps something that might have taken a knock or two but is still just as wonderful on the inside.

  • Double Loyalty Points! – for one day only, if you’re a member of our Friends of Farrells (FOF) Loyalty Program, you’ll earn double points for any eligible transaction (usual FOF rules apply).  Ask in store if you’d like to hear more about the Friends of Farrells Program – perhaps sign up on the day!

An unexpected but wonderful surprise…

…2019 Regional Bookstore of the Year

At the annual independent booksellers conference in Adelaide last month, we were delighted to discover we had been voted by Australian publishers as the 2019 Regional Bookstore of the Year…in the whole of Australia!

The Leading Edge Group, who coordinates the conference, asks all publishers to nominate their top 3 metro and regional stores according to the following criteria:  

  • Successful and committed book retailing;

  • Excellence in in-store and online environment;

  • Community engagement such as book clubs/author events;

  • Operational expertise in areas such as buying, returns, and range management;

  • Creative marketing campaigns;

  • Engagement in LEB and publisher marketing initiatives and group events; and

  • Contributing to the viability of the entire book trade.

Our friends at Matilda’s Bookshop in Adelaide took out the prize for the Metro category, with runners up Readings and The Avenue Bookstore, while the other finalists in the Regional category were BooksPlus in Bathurst and The Bookshop Bowral.  We were humbled to be nominated with such high quality businesses and passionate booksellers.

We would like to extend our thanks to our amazing staff and our gratitude to our wonderful community, who continue to support us by shopping local and making Farrells the Mornington institution it is.   

Also announced at the annual dinner, at which we enjoyed an amazingly moving performance from Archie Roach, were the annual Indie Book Awards.  The winners of these awards are chosen by independent booksellers around Austarlia, who are renowned for their love of books and reading, support new and emerging Australian authors and foster a love of quality writing.  The winning books for 2019 were:

  • Fiction Book of the Year: Bridge of Clay by Markus Zusak

  • Non-fiction Book of the Year: The Arsonist by Chloe Hooper

  • Debut Fiction Book of the Year: Boy Swallows Universe by Trent Dalton

  • Illustrated Non-fiction Book of Year: Welcome to Country by Marcia Langton

  • Children’s Book of the Year: Lenny’s Book of Everything by Karen Foxlee

  • Young Adult Book of the Year: A Song Only I Can Hear by Barry Jonsberg

  • Overall Book of the Year (selected from the winners of all categories): Boy Swallows Universe by Trent Dalton.